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Academic Listening for Health Professions, Elementary Level. Second Edition

Published on 2007
$40.00
PREFACE Welcome to the second edition of Academic Listening for Health Professions, Elementary Level. This new edition is the product of constant revision and evaluation, not by me, but by the many instructors who, along with their students, have used the previous edition and have sent in valuable suggestions and comments. The success of the previous edition has been due, in large measure, to the honest and careful appraisal given by instructors and their students. Academic Listening for Health Professions, Elementary Level is the first in a series of English language texts designed for use in health colleges, institutes and adult English-language training programmes. This volume consists of eight units organized around selected rhetorical functions: general ideas, specific information, classification, definitions, chronological order, cause and effect, comparing and contrasting, and processes and procedures. The book is aimed at Arab students who are at an elementary level of English as a Foreign Language (EFL). Each unit is graded from listening at sentence level to listening to a short passage, and aims at developing students’ skills in listening in Medical English. Prelistening and postlistening activities are included in each unit. The book is accompanied by one CD. Organization of Units Each of the eight units consists of the following sections: Before Listening Some questions to discuss orally in order to give learners an idea of the subject matter and prepare them for listening. Vocabulary Preview A list of five to eight vocabulary items that appears undefined in the listening. They are briefly defined in the preview and are accompanied by sentences with missing words to be filled in. Brief definitions are sometimes given on the tape, in which case the student listens to the talk and then writes a short definition for each item. Listening passages are given by a variety of native speakers of English. The vocabulary, structure, content variation, redundancy, and rhetorical style of each passage have been carefully chosen and designed. The talks, organized around specific rhetorical functions, include general ideas, specific information, classification, definitions, chronological order, cause and effect, comparing and contrasting, and processes and procedures. Listening Exercises A variety of listening exercises that focus on listening skills as related to the rhetorical function being focused on. These include making an outline which is partially completed in order to lay out the rhetorical structure of the talk. After Listening Written-exercise types on the specific rhetorical function to help the listener reconstruct important information from the talk. Rationale for the Course Design Listening to sentence-level material and short passages trains elementary students in listening skills relevant to the rhetorical function under consideration. Materials are controlled for concept-redundancy. Each passage contains a limited number of ideas that the listener retains. Support for these key ideas (that is, redundancy) comes in the form of rewordings, examples, clear transition markers, and summarizing. Because of the graded use of language within the talks, learners acquire the ability to process spoken language for increasingly longer spans of time – a highly desirable target. In order to ensure a high degree of comprehension and monitoring of passage, a large percentage of content words need to be readily understood. The topics chosen for the talks have, therefore, been made as tangible as possible, with the vocabulary kept within an elementary-level word-frequency range. Finally, an important skill for students is note-taking, by which they spot the main points of a talk and write them down in note form. These notes help the listener to remember the main points of the talk. Note-taking is an individual activity, so one person may have difficulty understanding another person’s notes. The activities in this book should help the student take down clearer, more concise notes. In further activities, the learner is often asked to complete the notes. Contents UNIT 1: GENERAL IDEAS UNIT 2: SPECIFIC INFORMATION UNIT 3: CLASSIFICATION UNIT 4: DEFINITIONS UNIT 5: CHRONOLOGICAL ORDER UNIT 6: CAUSE AND EFFECT UNIT 7: COMPARING AND CONTRASTING UNIT 8: PROCESSES AND PROCEDURES
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Academic Listening for Health Professions, Elementary Level. Second Edition

$40.00
PREFACE Welcome to the second edition of Academic Listening for Health Professions, Elementary Level. This new edition is the product of constant revision and evaluation, not by me, but by the many instructors who, along with their students, have used the previous edition and have sent in valuable suggestions and comments. The success of the previous edition has been due, in large measure, to the honest and careful appraisal given by instructors and their students. Academic Listening for Health Professions, Elementary Level is the first in a series of English language texts designed for use in health colleges, institutes and adult English-language training programmes. This volume consists of eight units organized around selected rhetorical functions: general ideas, specific information, classification, definitions, chronological order, cause and effect, comparing and contrasting, and processes and procedures. The book is aimed at Arab students who are at an elementary level of English as a Foreign Language (EFL). Each unit is graded from listening at sentence level to listening to a short passage, and aims at developing students’ skills in listening in Medical English. Prelistening and postlistening activities are included in each unit. The book is accompanied by one CD. Organization of Units Each of the eight units consists of the following sections: Before Listening Some questions to discuss orally in order to give learners an idea of the subject matter and prepare them for listening. Vocabulary Preview A list of five to eight vocabulary items that appears undefined in the listening. They are briefly defined in the preview and are accompanied by sentences with missing words to be filled in. Brief definitions are sometimes given on the tape, in which case the student listens to the talk and then writes a short definition for each item. Listening passages are given by a variety of native speakers of English. The vocabulary, structure, content variation, redundancy, and rhetorical style of each passage have been carefully chosen and designed. The talks, organized around specific rhetorical functions, include general ideas, specific information, classification, definitions, chronological order, cause and effect, comparing and contrasting, and processes and procedures. Listening Exercises A variety of listening exercises that focus on listening skills as related to the rhetorical function being focused on. These include making an outline which is partially completed in order to lay out the rhetorical structure of the talk. After Listening Written-exercise types on the specific rhetorical function to help the listener reconstruct important information from the talk. Rationale for the Course Design Listening to sentence-level material and short passages trains elementary students in listening skills relevant to the rhetorical function under consideration. Materials are controlled for concept-redundancy. Each passage contains a limited number of ideas that the listener retains. Support for these key ideas (that is, redundancy) comes in the form of rewordings, examples, clear transition markers, and summarizing. Because of the graded use of language within the talks, learners acquire the ability to process spoken language for increasingly longer spans of time – a highly desirable target. In order to ensure a high degree of comprehension and monitoring of passage, a large percentage of content words need to be readily understood. The topics chosen for the talks have, therefore, been made as tangible as possible, with the vocabulary kept within an elementary-level word-frequency range. Finally, an important skill for students is note-taking, by which they spot the main points of a talk and write them down in note form. These notes help the listener to remember the main points of the talk. Note-taking is an individual activity, so one person may have difficulty understanding another person’s notes. The activities in this book should help the student take down clearer, more concise notes. In further activities, the learner is often asked to complete the notes. Contents UNIT 1: GENERAL IDEAS UNIT 2: SPECIFIC INFORMATION UNIT 3: CLASSIFICATION UNIT 4: DEFINITIONS UNIT 5: CHRONOLOGICAL ORDER UNIT 6: CAUSE AND EFFECT UNIT 7: COMPARING AND CONTRASTING UNIT 8: PROCESSES AND PROCEDURES
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Academic Listening for Health Professions, Intermeiate level, Second Edition

Published on 2007
$40.00
Welcome to the second edition of Academic Listening For Health Professions, Intermediate Level. This new edition is the product of constantrevision and evaluation, not by me, but by the many instructors who, along with theirstudents, have used the previous edition and have sent in valuable suggestions andcomments. The success of the previous edition has been due, in large measure, to thehonest and careful appraisal given by instructors and their students. Academic Listening For Health Professions, Intermediate Level is thesecond in a series of English language texts designed for use in health colleges,institutes and adult English-language training programmes. This volume consists of eightunits organized around selected rhetorical functions: general ideas, specificinformation, classification, defining, chronological order, cause and effect,comparing and contrasting, and processes and procedures. The book isaimed at Arab students who are at an intermediate level of English as a ForeignLanguage (EFL). Each unit is graded from listening at sentence level to listening to ashort passage, and aims at developing students’ skills in listening in medical English.Prelistening and postlistening activities are included in each unit. The book isaccompanied by one audio CD. Organization of Units Each of the eight units consists of the following sections:
  • Before Listening
Some questions to discuss orally in order to give learners an idea of the subjectmatter and prepare them for listening.
  • Vocabulary Preview
A list of five to eight vocabulary items that appear undefined in the listening. They arebriefly defined in the preview and are accompanied by sentences with missing words tobe filled in. Brief definitions are sometimes given on the tape, in which case thestudent listens to the talk and then writes a short definition for each item.
  • Listening
The listening passages are read by a variety of native speakers of English. Thevocabulary, structure, content variation, redundancy, and rhetorical style of eachpassage have been carefully chosen and designed.
  • Listening Exercises

A variety of listening exercises that focus on listening skills is related to the rhetorical function being focused on. These include making an outline which is partiallycompleted in order to lay out the rhetorical structure of the talk.

  • After Listening

Written-exercise types on the specific rhetorical function to help the listener reconstruct important information from the talk.

Rationale for the Course Design

Listening to sentence-level material and short passages trains intermediatestudents in listening skills relevant to the rhetorical function under consideration.

Materials are controlled for concept-recycling. Each passage contains a limited number of ideas that the listener retains. Support for these key ideas (that is,recycling) comes in the form of rewordings, examples, clear transition markers,and summarizing.

Because of the graded use of language within the talks, learners acquire theability to process spoken language for increasingly longer spans of time - a highlydesirable target.

In order to ensure a high degree of comprehension and monitoring of passage, a large percentage of content words need to be readily understood. Thetopics chosen for the talks have, therefore, been made as tangible as possible, with thevocabulary kept within an intermediate-level word-frequency range.

Finally, an important skill for students is note-taking, by which they spotthe main points of a talk and write them down in note form. These notes help thelistener to remember the main points of the talk.

Note-taking is an individual activity, so one person may have difficultyunderstanding another person's notes. The activities in this book should help thestudent take down clearer, more concise notes. In further activities, the learner is

often asked to complete the notes.

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Academic Listening for Health Professions, Intermeiate level, Second Edition

$40.00
Welcome to the second edition of Academic Listening For Health Professions, Intermediate Level. This new edition is the product of constantrevision and evaluation, not by me, but by the many instructors who, along with theirstudents, have used the previous edition and have sent in valuable suggestions andcomments. The success of the previous edition has been due, in large measure, to thehonest and careful appraisal given by instructors and their students. Academic Listening For Health Professions, Intermediate Level is thesecond in a series of English language texts designed for use in health colleges,institutes and adult English-language training programmes. This volume consists of eightunits organized around selected rhetorical functions: general ideas, specificinformation, classification, defining, chronological order, cause and effect,comparing and contrasting, and processes and procedures. The book isaimed at Arab students who are at an intermediate level of English as a ForeignLanguage (EFL). Each unit is graded from listening at sentence level to listening to ashort passage, and aims at developing students’ skills in listening in medical English.Prelistening and postlistening activities are included in each unit. The book isaccompanied by one audio CD. Organization of Units Each of the eight units consists of the following sections:
  • Before Listening
Some questions to discuss orally in order to give learners an idea of the subjectmatter and prepare them for listening.
  • Vocabulary Preview
A list of five to eight vocabulary items that appear undefined in the listening. They arebriefly defined in the preview and are accompanied by sentences with missing words tobe filled in. Brief definitions are sometimes given on the tape, in which case thestudent listens to the talk and then writes a short definition for each item.
  • Listening
The listening passages are read by a variety of native speakers of English. Thevocabulary, structure, content variation, redundancy, and rhetorical style of eachpassage have been carefully chosen and designed.
  • Listening Exercises

A variety of listening exercises that focus on listening skills is related to the rhetorical function being focused on. These include making an outline which is partiallycompleted in order to lay out the rhetorical structure of the talk.

  • After Listening

Written-exercise types on the specific rhetorical function to help the listener reconstruct important information from the talk.

Rationale for the Course Design

Listening to sentence-level material and short passages trains intermediatestudents in listening skills relevant to the rhetorical function under consideration.

Materials are controlled for concept-recycling. Each passage contains a limited number of ideas that the listener retains. Support for these key ideas (that is,recycling) comes in the form of rewordings, examples, clear transition markers,and summarizing.

Because of the graded use of language within the talks, learners acquire theability to process spoken language for increasingly longer spans of time - a highlydesirable target.

In order to ensure a high degree of comprehension and monitoring of passage, a large percentage of content words need to be readily understood. Thetopics chosen for the talks have, therefore, been made as tangible as possible, with thevocabulary kept within an intermediate-level word-frequency range.

Finally, an important skill for students is note-taking, by which they spotthe main points of a talk and write them down in note form. These notes help thelistener to remember the main points of the talk.

Note-taking is an individual activity, so one person may have difficultyunderstanding another person's notes. The activities in this book should help thestudent take down clearer, more concise notes. In further activities, the learner is

often asked to complete the notes.

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Academic Writing for Health Professions, Elementary Level, Fourth Edition

Published on 2023
$40.00

Academic Writing for Health Professions: Elementary Level! This new edition is the product of extensive revision and evaluation, not only by myself and my students, but by the many instructors who, along with their students, have used the previous edition and have contributed valuable suggestions and comments. The success of the previous edition has been due, in large measure, to the honest and careful appraisal given by language instructors and their students.

Academic Writing for Health Professions: Elementary Level is designed for university students or professionals who are studying English as a Foreign Language (EFL) at an elementary level.

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Academic Writing for Health Professions, Elementary Level, Fourth Edition

$40.00

Academic Writing for Health Professions: Elementary Level! This new edition is the product of extensive revision and evaluation, not only by myself and my students, but by the many instructors who, along with their students, have used the previous edition and have contributed valuable suggestions and comments. The success of the previous edition has been due, in large measure, to the honest and careful appraisal given by language instructors and their students.

Academic Writing for Health Professions: Elementary Level is designed for university students or professionals who are studying English as a Foreign Language (EFL) at an elementary level.

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Academic Writing for Health Professions, Elementary Level. Third Edition

$40.00
PREFACE Welcome to the third edition to Academic Writing for Health Professions: Elementary Level! This new edition is the product of extensive revision and evaluation, not only by myself and my students, but by the many instructors who, along with their students, have used the previous edition and have contributed valuable suggestions and comments. The success of the previous edition has been due, in large measure, to the honest and careful appraisal given by language instructors and their students. Academic Writing for Health Professions: Elementary Level is designed for university students or professionals who are studying English as a Foreign Language (EFL) at an elementary level. The underlying philosophy of the book is the author’s conviction that basic organizational skills and modes of communication need to be taught at a very early stage to all students, regardless of whether they are native or non-native speakers of a language. Putting off this crucial concept until grammatical mastery has been achieved results, in my view, in the acquiring of a narrow focus on language which becomes difficult to rectify later in students’ careers, when they are expected to produce samples of extended writing that communicate coherently. To this end, the text adopts from the first an approach to meaningful writing using step-by-step explanations and exercises that guide the student towards the desired goal. This is done using six practical and academic writing purposes: Giving Instructions, Telling What Happened, Classifying, Explaining Cause and Effect, Comparing and Contrasting, and Describing a Mechanism or a Process. The text is designed so that the six writing purposes and the general content of the units gradually increase in complexity. While some degree of control is of course essential in any teaching situation, a conscious attempt has been made to allow also for student creativity and individuality. This is done by beginning each unit with clear examples and controlled exercises to learn specific organization and grammar skills. By the second part of each unit, the control gives way to looser guidance. Students use the skills they have learned to plan and write compositions that move from carefully guided to unguided. A typical unit opens with Objectives and a short Introduction discussing the writing purpose and pointing out its academic and practical use. This is followed by several Writing Tips for addressing the rhetorical purpose in question. Next comes a section on Planning (in the form of an outline, an idea map, informal notes, a chart, or an information table), followed by an Example Composition illustrating in clear and simple language the unit’s rhetorical purpose. The topics are designed to be diverse, relevant, and interesting to EFL students undertaking medical courses: How to control external bleeding, sun stroke, hot compresses, causes of fainting, comparing and contrasting measles and rubella, how the respiratory system works, and so on. A section on Functional Skills gives practice on logical relationships and other concepts related to the unit’s rhetorical purpose. This is followed by Organization Skills, which require students to actively work with introductions, main idea sentences, transitions, and conclusions, all of which are introduced in a simple and structured manner. After that, the Grammar Skills and Punctuation Skills segments treat the grammatical structures and punctuation relevant to the writing purpose in question, and opportunities for controlled and freer practice are given. At the end of each unit, a Guided Writing section provides students with an opportunity to consolidate what they have learned. Their writing is controlled by picture cues or information tables, and the guided composition is similar to the example composition in vocabulary and organizational principles. CONTENTS Unit 1 Giving Instructions Unit 2 Telling What Happened: Unit 3 Classifying Unit 4 Explaining Cause and Effect Unit 5 Comparing and Contrasting Unit 6 Describing a Mechanism or a Process
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Academic Writing for Health Professions, Elementary Level. Third Edition

$40.00
PREFACE Welcome to the third edition to Academic Writing for Health Professions: Elementary Level! This new edition is the product of extensive revision and evaluation, not only by myself and my students, but by the many instructors who, along with their students, have used the previous edition and have contributed valuable suggestions and comments. The success of the previous edition has been due, in large measure, to the honest and careful appraisal given by language instructors and their students. Academic Writing for Health Professions: Elementary Level is designed for university students or professionals who are studying English as a Foreign Language (EFL) at an elementary level. The underlying philosophy of the book is the author’s conviction that basic organizational skills and modes of communication need to be taught at a very early stage to all students, regardless of whether they are native or non-native speakers of a language. Putting off this crucial concept until grammatical mastery has been achieved results, in my view, in the acquiring of a narrow focus on language which becomes difficult to rectify later in students’ careers, when they are expected to produce samples of extended writing that communicate coherently. To this end, the text adopts from the first an approach to meaningful writing using step-by-step explanations and exercises that guide the student towards the desired goal. This is done using six practical and academic writing purposes: Giving Instructions, Telling What Happened, Classifying, Explaining Cause and Effect, Comparing and Contrasting, and Describing a Mechanism or a Process. The text is designed so that the six writing purposes and the general content of the units gradually increase in complexity. While some degree of control is of course essential in any teaching situation, a conscious attempt has been made to allow also for student creativity and individuality. This is done by beginning each unit with clear examples and controlled exercises to learn specific organization and grammar skills. By the second part of each unit, the control gives way to looser guidance. Students use the skills they have learned to plan and write compositions that move from carefully guided to unguided. A typical unit opens with Objectives and a short Introduction discussing the writing purpose and pointing out its academic and practical use. This is followed by several Writing Tips for addressing the rhetorical purpose in question. Next comes a section on Planning (in the form of an outline, an idea map, informal notes, a chart, or an information table), followed by an Example Composition illustrating in clear and simple language the unit’s rhetorical purpose. The topics are designed to be diverse, relevant, and interesting to EFL students undertaking medical courses: How to control external bleeding, sun stroke, hot compresses, causes of fainting, comparing and contrasting measles and rubella, how the respiratory system works, and so on. A section on Functional Skills gives practice on logical relationships and other concepts related to the unit’s rhetorical purpose. This is followed by Organization Skills, which require students to actively work with introductions, main idea sentences, transitions, and conclusions, all of which are introduced in a simple and structured manner. After that, the Grammar Skills and Punctuation Skills segments treat the grammatical structures and punctuation relevant to the writing purpose in question, and opportunities for controlled and freer practice are given. At the end of each unit, a Guided Writing section provides students with an opportunity to consolidate what they have learned. Their writing is controlled by picture cues or information tables, and the guided composition is similar to the example composition in vocabulary and organizational principles. CONTENTS Unit 1 Giving Instructions Unit 2 Telling What Happened: Unit 3 Classifying Unit 4 Explaining Cause and Effect Unit 5 Comparing and Contrasting Unit 6 Describing a Mechanism or a Process
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Academic Writing for Health Professions, Intermediate Level, 4th Edition

Published on 2023
$40.00

Academic Writing for Health Professions: Intermediate Level! This new edition is the product of extensive revision and evaluation, not only by myself and my students, but by the many instructors who, along with their students, have used the previous edition and have contributed valuable suggestions and comments. The success of the previous edition has been due, in large measure, to the honest and carefulappraisal given by language instructors and their students.

Academic Writing for Health Professions: Intermediate Level is designed for university students or professionals who are studying English as a Foreign Language (EFL) at an intermediate level.

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Academic Writing for Health Professions, Intermediate Level, 4th Edition

$40.00

Academic Writing for Health Professions: Intermediate Level! This new edition is the product of extensive revision and evaluation, not only by myself and my students, but by the many instructors who, along with their students, have used the previous edition and have contributed valuable suggestions and comments. The success of the previous edition has been due, in large measure, to the honest and carefulappraisal given by language instructors and their students.

Academic Writing for Health Professions: Intermediate Level is designed for university students or professionals who are studying English as a Foreign Language (EFL) at an intermediate level.

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Academic Writing for Health Professions, Intermediate Level. Third Edition.

Published on 2009
$40.00
Academic Writing for Health Professions: Intermediate Level is designed for university students or professionals who are studying English as a Foreign Language (EFL) at an intermediate level. The underlying philosophy of the book is the author’s conviction that basic organizational skills and modes of communication need to be taught at a very early stage to all students, regardless of whether they are native or non-native speakers of a language. Putting off this crucial concept until grammatical mastery has been achieved results, in my view, in the acquiring of a narrow focus on language which becomes difficult to rectify later in students’ careers, when they are expected to produce samples of extended writing that communicate coherently. To this end, the text adopts from the first an approach to meaningful writing using step-by-step explanations and exercises that guide the student towards the desired goal. This is done using six practical and academic writing purposes: Giving Instructions, Telling What Happened, Classifying, Explaining Cause and Effect, Comparing and Contrasting, and Describing a Mechanism or a Process. The text is designed so that the six writing purposes and the general content of the units gradually increase in complexity. While some degree of control is of course essential in any teaching situation, a conscious attempt has been made to allow also for student creativity and individuality. This is done by beginning each unit with clear examples and controlled exercises to learn specific organization and grammar skills. By the second part of each unit, the control gives way to looser guidance. Students use the skills they have learned to plan and write compositions that move from carefully guided to unguided. A typical unit opens with Objectives and a short Introduction discussing the writing purpose and pointing out its academic and practical use. This is followed by several Writing Tips for addressing the rhetorical purpose in question. Next comes a section on Planning (in the form of an outline, an idea map, informal notes, a chart, or an information table), followed by an Example Composition illustrating in clear and simple language the unit’s rhetorical purpose. The topics are designed to be diverse, relevant, and interesting to EFL students undertaking medical courses: How to wash your hands, Causes of ill health, Measles versus influenza, and so on. A section on Functional Skills gives practice on logical relationships and other concepts related to the unit’s rhetorical purpose. This is followed by Organization Skills, which require students to actively work with introductions, main idea sentences, transitions, and conclusions, all of which are introduced in a simple and structured manner. After that, the Grammar Skills and Punctuation Skills segments treat the grammatical structures and punctuation relevant to the writing purpose in question, and opportunities for controlled and freer practice are given. At the end of each unit, a Guided Writing section provides students with an opportunity to consolidate what they have learned. Their writing is controlled by picture cues or information tables, and the guided composition is similar to the example composition in vocabulary and organizational principles. Finally, an Unguided Writing section encourages the students to experiment with the skills they have learned by writing on one of several suggested unillustrated topics.
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Academic Writing for Health Professions, Intermediate Level. Third Edition.

$40.00
Academic Writing for Health Professions: Intermediate Level is designed for university students or professionals who are studying English as a Foreign Language (EFL) at an intermediate level. The underlying philosophy of the book is the author’s conviction that basic organizational skills and modes of communication need to be taught at a very early stage to all students, regardless of whether they are native or non-native speakers of a language. Putting off this crucial concept until grammatical mastery has been achieved results, in my view, in the acquiring of a narrow focus on language which becomes difficult to rectify later in students’ careers, when they are expected to produce samples of extended writing that communicate coherently. To this end, the text adopts from the first an approach to meaningful writing using step-by-step explanations and exercises that guide the student towards the desired goal. This is done using six practical and academic writing purposes: Giving Instructions, Telling What Happened, Classifying, Explaining Cause and Effect, Comparing and Contrasting, and Describing a Mechanism or a Process. The text is designed so that the six writing purposes and the general content of the units gradually increase in complexity. While some degree of control is of course essential in any teaching situation, a conscious attempt has been made to allow also for student creativity and individuality. This is done by beginning each unit with clear examples and controlled exercises to learn specific organization and grammar skills. By the second part of each unit, the control gives way to looser guidance. Students use the skills they have learned to plan and write compositions that move from carefully guided to unguided. A typical unit opens with Objectives and a short Introduction discussing the writing purpose and pointing out its academic and practical use. This is followed by several Writing Tips for addressing the rhetorical purpose in question. Next comes a section on Planning (in the form of an outline, an idea map, informal notes, a chart, or an information table), followed by an Example Composition illustrating in clear and simple language the unit’s rhetorical purpose. The topics are designed to be diverse, relevant, and interesting to EFL students undertaking medical courses: How to wash your hands, Causes of ill health, Measles versus influenza, and so on. A section on Functional Skills gives practice on logical relationships and other concepts related to the unit’s rhetorical purpose. This is followed by Organization Skills, which require students to actively work with introductions, main idea sentences, transitions, and conclusions, all of which are introduced in a simple and structured manner. After that, the Grammar Skills and Punctuation Skills segments treat the grammatical structures and punctuation relevant to the writing purpose in question, and opportunities for controlled and freer practice are given. At the end of each unit, a Guided Writing section provides students with an opportunity to consolidate what they have learned. Their writing is controlled by picture cues or information tables, and the guided composition is similar to the example composition in vocabulary and organizational principles. Finally, an Unguided Writing section encourages the students to experiment with the skills they have learned by writing on one of several suggested unillustrated topics.
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Communicative English for Health Professions, Elementary Level Second Edition

Published on 2009
$40.00
Welcome to the second edition to Communicative English for Health Professions, Elementary Level! This new edition is the product of extensive revision and evaluation, not only by me and my students, but by the many instructors who, along with their students, have used the previous edition and have contributed valuable suggestions and comments. The success of the previous edition has been due, in large measure, to the honest and careful appraisal given by language instructors and their students. Communicative English for Health Professions, Elementary Level, is a communicative textbook designed to enable health-science students at an elementary level of English as a foreign language to communicate in medical-hospital settings. The focus is on the processes of communication and conversational fluency as a goal in conversation classes, rather than on grammar. To enable a health-science student to converse in a medical setting, s/he must be familiar with a wide range of topics that occur in a hospital environment. The student needs to be able both to respond to and initiate questions on situations, events, and activities that commonly take place during interaction with speakers of English. For this reason, all situations, tasks, and activities are taken from real-life situations that occur in hospital settings, for example, opening a file, asking about the location of medical items, making clinical appointments, giving directions, expressing opinions about medical services, asking for past medical history, requesting, complaining politely, and so on. Unit Organization Communicative English for Health Professions, Elementary Level, contains ten units, each made up of two lessons. Each lesson begins with pre-listening questions designed to stimulate student interest and focus on the conversation topic. Discussing the questions in pairs, small groups, or as a class enables students to make better use of their knowledge of the topic as they listen to the conversation. Then a recorded conversation is introduced with a vocabulary section that explains difficult words in the conversation. Students should be given several opportunities to hear the conversation. First, play the entire conversation without stopping. Then play it again with frequent pauses during which students can repeat the lines. They will also read it afterwards. As they do so, have they practise the ‘read and look up’ technique: One student looks at the text to be read aloud. When ready to speak, s/he looks at his/her partner and says a line (or part of a line). S/he then looks down at the page again for the next line, and again looks up while saying it. The reader’s eyes should never be in the book while s/he is speaking. This will help students to role-play more naturally. At the same time, it will improve their Reading fluency by requiring them to take in phrases, rather than read word-by-word. Although students may resist this technique in the beginning, repeated practice will help them see how useful it is. The Pronunciation Focus section highlights important pronunciation points in each unit. These points are: sentence stress, intonation, rhythm, blending, and reduction. By paying particular attention to these points, you will make your students aware of them. In the Guided Practice section, every function heard in the conversation is presented and concentrated on separately. Every student is given an opportunity to practise the new functions with a partner or in a small group. The types of practice are controlled so as to suit elementary-level students. Both lessons in each unit end with a task-based Listening Practice which is designed to help students with real-life listening tasks. Following presentation of the recording, students listen again to check their own answers before comparing them with those of partners or the class. Grammar and Usage Communicative English for Health Professions is not meant to be a grammar text and should not be used as one. The author assumes that basic grammar has already been learned, and now the students need practice in using grammar in a natural, conversational setting. However, grammar is carefully controlled so that, as far as possible, the major points of English grammar are reviewed in natural contexts. The units progress in difficulty, although they can be done out of sequence if that seems appropriate or necessary.  
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Communicative English for Health Professions, Elementary Level Second Edition

$40.00
Welcome to the second edition to Communicative English for Health Professions, Elementary Level! This new edition is the product of extensive revision and evaluation, not only by me and my students, but by the many instructors who, along with their students, have used the previous edition and have contributed valuable suggestions and comments. The success of the previous edition has been due, in large measure, to the honest and careful appraisal given by language instructors and their students. Communicative English for Health Professions, Elementary Level, is a communicative textbook designed to enable health-science students at an elementary level of English as a foreign language to communicate in medical-hospital settings. The focus is on the processes of communication and conversational fluency as a goal in conversation classes, rather than on grammar. To enable a health-science student to converse in a medical setting, s/he must be familiar with a wide range of topics that occur in a hospital environment. The student needs to be able both to respond to and initiate questions on situations, events, and activities that commonly take place during interaction with speakers of English. For this reason, all situations, tasks, and activities are taken from real-life situations that occur in hospital settings, for example, opening a file, asking about the location of medical items, making clinical appointments, giving directions, expressing opinions about medical services, asking for past medical history, requesting, complaining politely, and so on. Unit Organization Communicative English for Health Professions, Elementary Level, contains ten units, each made up of two lessons. Each lesson begins with pre-listening questions designed to stimulate student interest and focus on the conversation topic. Discussing the questions in pairs, small groups, or as a class enables students to make better use of their knowledge of the topic as they listen to the conversation. Then a recorded conversation is introduced with a vocabulary section that explains difficult words in the conversation. Students should be given several opportunities to hear the conversation. First, play the entire conversation without stopping. Then play it again with frequent pauses during which students can repeat the lines. They will also read it afterwards. As they do so, have they practise the ‘read and look up’ technique: One student looks at the text to be read aloud. When ready to speak, s/he looks at his/her partner and says a line (or part of a line). S/he then looks down at the page again for the next line, and again looks up while saying it. The reader’s eyes should never be in the book while s/he is speaking. This will help students to role-play more naturally. At the same time, it will improve their Reading fluency by requiring them to take in phrases, rather than read word-by-word. Although students may resist this technique in the beginning, repeated practice will help them see how useful it is. The Pronunciation Focus section highlights important pronunciation points in each unit. These points are: sentence stress, intonation, rhythm, blending, and reduction. By paying particular attention to these points, you will make your students aware of them. In the Guided Practice section, every function heard in the conversation is presented and concentrated on separately. Every student is given an opportunity to practise the new functions with a partner or in a small group. The types of practice are controlled so as to suit elementary-level students. Both lessons in each unit end with a task-based Listening Practice which is designed to help students with real-life listening tasks. Following presentation of the recording, students listen again to check their own answers before comparing them with those of partners or the class. Grammar and Usage Communicative English for Health Professions is not meant to be a grammar text and should not be used as one. The author assumes that basic grammar has already been learned, and now the students need practice in using grammar in a natural, conversational setting. However, grammar is carefully controlled so that, as far as possible, the major points of English grammar are reviewed in natural contexts. The units progress in difficulty, although they can be done out of sequence if that seems appropriate or necessary.  
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Communicative English for Helath Professions, Intermediate Level, Second Edition

Published on 2009
$40.00
Welcome to the second edition to Communicative English for Health Professions, Intermediate Level! This new edition is the product of extensive revision and evaluation, not only by me and my students, but by the many instructors who, along with their students, have used the previous edition and have contributed valuable suggestions and comments. The success of the previous edition has been due, in large measure, to the honest and careful appraisal given by language instructors and their students. Communicative English for Health Professions, Elementary Level, is a communicative textbook designed to enable health-science students at an elementary level of English as a foreign language to communicate in medical-hospital settings. The focus is on the processes of communication and conversational fluency as a goal in conversation classes, rather than on grammar. To enable a health-science student to converse in a medical setting, s/he must be familiar with a wide range of topics that occur in a hospital environment. The student needs to be able both to respond to and initiate questions on situations, events, and activities that commonly take place during interaction with speakers of English. For this reason, all situations, tasks, and activities are taken from real-life situations that occur in hospital settings, for example, opening a file, asking about the location of medical items, making clinical appointments, giving directions, expressing opinions about medical services, asking for past medical history, requesting, complaining politely, and so on. Unit Organization Communicative English for Health Professions, Elementary Level, contains ten units, each made up of two lessons. Each lesson begins with pre-listening questions designed to stimulate student interest and focus on the conversation topic. Discussing the questions in pairs, small groups, or as a class enables students to make better use of their knowledge of the topic as they listen to the conversation. Then a recorded conversation is introduced with a vocabulary section that explains difficult words in the conversation. Students should be given several opportunities to hear the conversation. First, play the entire conversation without stopping. Then play it again with frequent pauses during which students can repeat the lines. They will also read it afterwards. As they do so, have they practise the ‘read and look up’ technique: One student looks at the text to be read aloud. When ready to speak, s/he looks at his/her partner and says a line (or part of a line). S/he then looks down at the page again for the next line, and again looks up while saying it. The reader’s eyes should never be in the book while s/he is speaking. This will help students to role-play more naturally. At the same time, it will improve their Reading fluency by requiring them to take in phrases, rather than read word-by-word. Although students may resist this technique in the beginning, repeated practice will help them see how useful it is. The Pronunciation Focus section highlights important pronunciation points in each unit. These points are: sentence stress, intonation, rhythm, blending, and reduction. By paying particular attention to these points, you will make your students aware of them. In the Guided Practice section, every function heard in the conversation is presented and concentrated on separately. Every student is given an opportunity to practise the new functions with a partner or in a small group. The types of practice are controlled so as to suit elementary-level students. Both lessons in each unit end with a task-based Listening Practice which is designed to help students with real-life listening tasks. Following presentation of the recording, students listen again to check their own answers before comparing them with those of partners or the class. Grammar and Usage Communicative English for Health Professions is not meant to be a grammar text and should not be used as one. The author assumes that basic grammar has already been learned, and now the students need practice in using grammar in a natural, conversational setting. However, grammar is carefully controlled so that, as far as possible, the major points of English grammar are reviewed in natural contexts. The units progress in difficulty, although they can be done out of sequence if that seems appropriate or necessary.  
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Communicative English for Helath Professions, Intermediate Level, Second Edition

$40.00
Welcome to the second edition to Communicative English for Health Professions, Intermediate Level! This new edition is the product of extensive revision and evaluation, not only by me and my students, but by the many instructors who, along with their students, have used the previous edition and have contributed valuable suggestions and comments. The success of the previous edition has been due, in large measure, to the honest and careful appraisal given by language instructors and their students. Communicative English for Health Professions, Elementary Level, is a communicative textbook designed to enable health-science students at an elementary level of English as a foreign language to communicate in medical-hospital settings. The focus is on the processes of communication and conversational fluency as a goal in conversation classes, rather than on grammar. To enable a health-science student to converse in a medical setting, s/he must be familiar with a wide range of topics that occur in a hospital environment. The student needs to be able both to respond to and initiate questions on situations, events, and activities that commonly take place during interaction with speakers of English. For this reason, all situations, tasks, and activities are taken from real-life situations that occur in hospital settings, for example, opening a file, asking about the location of medical items, making clinical appointments, giving directions, expressing opinions about medical services, asking for past medical history, requesting, complaining politely, and so on. Unit Organization Communicative English for Health Professions, Elementary Level, contains ten units, each made up of two lessons. Each lesson begins with pre-listening questions designed to stimulate student interest and focus on the conversation topic. Discussing the questions in pairs, small groups, or as a class enables students to make better use of their knowledge of the topic as they listen to the conversation. Then a recorded conversation is introduced with a vocabulary section that explains difficult words in the conversation. Students should be given several opportunities to hear the conversation. First, play the entire conversation without stopping. Then play it again with frequent pauses during which students can repeat the lines. They will also read it afterwards. As they do so, have they practise the ‘read and look up’ technique: One student looks at the text to be read aloud. When ready to speak, s/he looks at his/her partner and says a line (or part of a line). S/he then looks down at the page again for the next line, and again looks up while saying it. The reader’s eyes should never be in the book while s/he is speaking. This will help students to role-play more naturally. At the same time, it will improve their Reading fluency by requiring them to take in phrases, rather than read word-by-word. Although students may resist this technique in the beginning, repeated practice will help them see how useful it is. The Pronunciation Focus section highlights important pronunciation points in each unit. These points are: sentence stress, intonation, rhythm, blending, and reduction. By paying particular attention to these points, you will make your students aware of them. In the Guided Practice section, every function heard in the conversation is presented and concentrated on separately. Every student is given an opportunity to practise the new functions with a partner or in a small group. The types of practice are controlled so as to suit elementary-level students. Both lessons in each unit end with a task-based Listening Practice which is designed to help students with real-life listening tasks. Following presentation of the recording, students listen again to check their own answers before comparing them with those of partners or the class. Grammar and Usage Communicative English for Health Professions is not meant to be a grammar text and should not be used as one. The author assumes that basic grammar has already been learned, and now the students need practice in using grammar in a natural, conversational setting. However, grammar is carefully controlled so that, as far as possible, the major points of English grammar are reviewed in natural contexts. The units progress in difficulty, although they can be done out of sequence if that seems appropriate or necessary.  
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English for Academic Purposes, Elementary Level, an integrated textbook. Third Edition

$40.00
PREFACE Welcome to the third edition of English For Academic Purposes, Elementary Level. This new edition is the product of ongoing revision and evaluation, not only by myself, but also by the many instructors who, along with their students, have used the previous edition and have contributed valuable suggestions and comments. The success of the previous edition has been due, in large measure, to the honest and careful appraisal given by instructors and their students. English For Academic Purposes is an integrated text organized around specific rhetorical functions: general ideas specific information classification chronological order cause and effect comparison and contrast prediction processes and procedures The book is aimed at Arab students at an elementary level of competence in English as a Foreign Language (EFL), and strives for cultural appropriateness. Unit Organization The book attempts to emphasize and integrate the basic skills of speaking, reading, and writing in the context of academic and everyday usage, with particular emphasis on the former. Grammar instruction, arising from the reading passages, is restricted so as to aid consolidation of the above basic skills. The introduction of grammatical items is graded and sequenced in accordance with the principles of elementary language acquisition. The reading passages have been carefully selected to reflect both an appropriate level of language and the Arab environment. They are arranged in eight units which consist of vocabulary and gap-fill passages, skimming and scanning exercises, and further activities to develop effective reading strategies. Specific grammar points from the reading passages lead on to writing and speaking exercises. CONTENTS UNIT 1: GENERAL IDEAS UNIT 2: SPECIFIC INFORMATION UNIT 3: CLASSIFICATION UNIT 4: CHRONOLOGICAL ORDER UNIT 5: CAUSE AND EFFECT UNIT 6: COMPARING AND CONTRASTING UNIT 7: PREDICTION UNIT 8: Processes and Procedures
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English for Academic Purposes, Elementary Level, an integrated textbook. Third Edition

$40.00
PREFACE Welcome to the third edition of English For Academic Purposes, Elementary Level. This new edition is the product of ongoing revision and evaluation, not only by myself, but also by the many instructors who, along with their students, have used the previous edition and have contributed valuable suggestions and comments. The success of the previous edition has been due, in large measure, to the honest and careful appraisal given by instructors and their students. English For Academic Purposes is an integrated text organized around specific rhetorical functions: general ideas specific information classification chronological order cause and effect comparison and contrast prediction processes and procedures The book is aimed at Arab students at an elementary level of competence in English as a Foreign Language (EFL), and strives for cultural appropriateness. Unit Organization The book attempts to emphasize and integrate the basic skills of speaking, reading, and writing in the context of academic and everyday usage, with particular emphasis on the former. Grammar instruction, arising from the reading passages, is restricted so as to aid consolidation of the above basic skills. The introduction of grammatical items is graded and sequenced in accordance with the principles of elementary language acquisition. The reading passages have been carefully selected to reflect both an appropriate level of language and the Arab environment. They are arranged in eight units which consist of vocabulary and gap-fill passages, skimming and scanning exercises, and further activities to develop effective reading strategies. Specific grammar points from the reading passages lead on to writing and speaking exercises. CONTENTS UNIT 1: GENERAL IDEAS UNIT 2: SPECIFIC INFORMATION UNIT 3: CLASSIFICATION UNIT 4: CHRONOLOGICAL ORDER UNIT 5: CAUSE AND EFFECT UNIT 6: COMPARING AND CONTRASTING UNIT 7: PREDICTION UNIT 8: Processes and Procedures
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English for Academic Purposes, Intermediate Level, an integrated textbook. Third Edition

$40.00
English For Academic Purposes is an integrated text organized around specific rhetorical functions: general ideas – specific information- classification- chronological order- cause and effect- comparison and contrast- prediction processes and procedures The book is aimed at Arab students at an intermediate level of competence in English as a Foreign Language (EFL), and strives for cultural appropriateness. Unit Organization The book attempts to emphasize and integrate the basic skills of speaking, reading, and writing in the context of academic and everyday usage, with particular emphasis on the former. Grammar instruction, arising from the reading passages, is restricted so as to aid consolidation of the above basic skills. This should explain, for example, the earlier-than-expected appearance of the past perfect tense (in Units 3, ahead of the present perfect tense) due to the natural occurrence of the tense in the reading, where it typically contrasts with the simple past tense. The reading passages have been carefully selected to reflect both an appropriate level of language and the Arab environment. They are arranged in eight units which consist of vocabulary and gap-fill exercises, skimming and scanning exercises, and further activities to develop effective reading strategies. Specific grammar points from the reading passages lead on to writing and speaking exercises. Contents UNIT 1 General Ideas UNIT 2 Specific Information UNIT 3 Chronological Order UNIT 4 Describing A Process UNIT 5 Cause And Effect Unit 6 Comparing And Contrasting UNIT 7 Classification Unit 8 Prediction
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English for Academic Purposes, Intermediate Level, an integrated textbook. Third Edition

$40.00
English For Academic Purposes is an integrated text organized around specific rhetorical functions: general ideas – specific information- classification- chronological order- cause and effect- comparison and contrast- prediction processes and procedures The book is aimed at Arab students at an intermediate level of competence in English as a Foreign Language (EFL), and strives for cultural appropriateness. Unit Organization The book attempts to emphasize and integrate the basic skills of speaking, reading, and writing in the context of academic and everyday usage, with particular emphasis on the former. Grammar instruction, arising from the reading passages, is restricted so as to aid consolidation of the above basic skills. This should explain, for example, the earlier-than-expected appearance of the past perfect tense (in Units 3, ahead of the present perfect tense) due to the natural occurrence of the tense in the reading, where it typically contrasts with the simple past tense. The reading passages have been carefully selected to reflect both an appropriate level of language and the Arab environment. They are arranged in eight units which consist of vocabulary and gap-fill exercises, skimming and scanning exercises, and further activities to develop effective reading strategies. Specific grammar points from the reading passages lead on to writing and speaking exercises. Contents UNIT 1 General Ideas UNIT 2 Specific Information UNIT 3 Chronological Order UNIT 4 Describing A Process UNIT 5 Cause And Effect Unit 6 Comparing And Contrasting UNIT 7 Classification Unit 8 Prediction
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English for Accounting and Banking, Elementary Level

Published on 2008
$40.00
ENGLISH FOR ACCOUNTING AND BANKING: Reading Skills, Elementary Level, is made up of twelve thematically-based units. Vocabulary-building and skill-building exercises, accompany each reading. Each unit consists of a brief pre-reading exercise and an exercise on skimming or scanning. Following the reading passage itself, there are post-reading exercises that focus on important reading skills: getting the main idea; understanding the reading structure; understanding from context; recognizing contextual reference; finding the topic and topic sentence; understanding general and specific ideas; understanding signal words; making an outline; understanding cause and effect, comparison, classification, addition words, and exemplification. Each part of the unit concludes with a discussion designed to encourage students to think about, distill, and discuss the information they have worked with throughout the unit. The discussion is followed by a writing exercise which requests students to write the answers to questions given in the discussion exercise. An important goal of ENGLISH FOR ACCOUNTING AND BANKING is to help accounting and banking students become confident readers by increasing their vocabulary base and improving their reading skills. It engages them in the process of reading thoughtfully and encourages them to move beyond passive reading.
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English for Accounting and Banking, Elementary Level

$40.00
ENGLISH FOR ACCOUNTING AND BANKING: Reading Skills, Elementary Level, is made up of twelve thematically-based units. Vocabulary-building and skill-building exercises, accompany each reading. Each unit consists of a brief pre-reading exercise and an exercise on skimming or scanning. Following the reading passage itself, there are post-reading exercises that focus on important reading skills: getting the main idea; understanding the reading structure; understanding from context; recognizing contextual reference; finding the topic and topic sentence; understanding general and specific ideas; understanding signal words; making an outline; understanding cause and effect, comparison, classification, addition words, and exemplification. Each part of the unit concludes with a discussion designed to encourage students to think about, distill, and discuss the information they have worked with throughout the unit. The discussion is followed by a writing exercise which requests students to write the answers to questions given in the discussion exercise. An important goal of ENGLISH FOR ACCOUNTING AND BANKING is to help accounting and banking students become confident readers by increasing their vocabulary base and improving their reading skills. It engages them in the process of reading thoughtfully and encourages them to move beyond passive reading.
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ENGLISH FOR ACCOUNTING AND BANKING: READING SKILLS, INTERMEDIATE LEVEL

Published on 2008
$40.00
ENGLISH FOR ACCOUNTING AND BANKING: Reading Skills, INTERMEDIATE Level, is made up of ten thematically-based units. Vocabulary-building and skill-building exercises accompany each reading. Each unit consists of a brief pre-reading exercise and an exercise on skimming or scanning. Following the reading passage itself, there are post-reading exercises that focus on important reading skills: getting the main idea; understanding the reading structure; understanding from context; recognizing contextual reference; recognizing the topic and topic sentence; understanding general and specific ideas; understanding signal words; making an outline; understanding cause and effect, comparison, classification and addition words; and exemplification. Each part of the unit concludes with a discussion designed to encourage students to think about, distill, and discuss the information they have read throughout the unit. The discussion is followed by a writing exercise which requests students to write the answers to the questions given in the discussion exercise. An important goal of ENGLISH FOR ACCOUNTING AND BANKING is to help accounting and banking students become confident readers by increasing their vocabulary base and improving their reading skills. It engages them in the process of reading thoughtfully and encourages them to move beyond passive reading.      
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ENGLISH FOR ACCOUNTING AND BANKING: READING SKILLS, INTERMEDIATE LEVEL

$40.00
ENGLISH FOR ACCOUNTING AND BANKING: Reading Skills, INTERMEDIATE Level, is made up of ten thematically-based units. Vocabulary-building and skill-building exercises accompany each reading. Each unit consists of a brief pre-reading exercise and an exercise on skimming or scanning. Following the reading passage itself, there are post-reading exercises that focus on important reading skills: getting the main idea; understanding the reading structure; understanding from context; recognizing contextual reference; recognizing the topic and topic sentence; understanding general and specific ideas; understanding signal words; making an outline; understanding cause and effect, comparison, classification and addition words; and exemplification. Each part of the unit concludes with a discussion designed to encourage students to think about, distill, and discuss the information they have read throughout the unit. The discussion is followed by a writing exercise which requests students to write the answers to the questions given in the discussion exercise. An important goal of ENGLISH FOR ACCOUNTING AND BANKING is to help accounting and banking students become confident readers by increasing their vocabulary base and improving their reading skills. It engages them in the process of reading thoughtfully and encourages them to move beyond passive reading.      
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English for Agricultural Science

Published on 2019
$40.00
English for Agricultural Sciences is made up of twelve thematically-based units, each of which contains one reading. The readings are authentic texts presenting a variety of agricultural topics in order to familiarize learners with relevant vocabulary as well as with different genres that learners may encounter in the course of their studies and careers. Skill-building and vocabulary-building activities accompany each reading. The book is accompanied by four progress tests, one test for every three units. The tests are designed to be conducted online where every student can use his/her username and password to do the tests and gets his results at the end of the test. The usernames and passwords appear on every copy of the books and are valid for one user only and not to be shared, i.e. the student who holds the original copy can access the website and do the relevant test. An important goal of English for Agricultural Sciences is to help students become confident readers by increasing their vocabulary base and improving their word comprehension skills. It engages them in the process of reading thoughtfully and encourages them to move beyond merely passive reading. To accomplish this, the book addresses the reading process in a direct manner, and various reading and vocabulary skills are presented as part of that process. The instruction and practice with reading skills help students increase their reading fluency, and equip them with skills they need for academic achievement. Focus on vocabulary-building promotes language acquisition and academic advancement. Also, the lexical and syntactic content of the readings has been controlled. The tasks are varied, accessible, and engaging, and they provide stimuli for frequent student-teacher and student-student interaction. Student awareness of reading and thinking processes is further encouraged in many parts of the book by exercises that require students to work in pairs or small groups. In discussions with others, students formulate and articulate their ideas more precisely, and so they acquire new ways of talking and thinking about a text. These activities present opportunities for real-world contact and real-world use of language. Students are asked to write and then read each other’s work so they can experience the connection between reading and writing. Speaking and writing skills are practiced through the ‘Discussion Questions and Discussing the Reading’ sections where questions can be dealt with orally and in writing.
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English for Agricultural Science

$40.00
English for Agricultural Sciences is made up of twelve thematically-based units, each of which contains one reading. The readings are authentic texts presenting a variety of agricultural topics in order to familiarize learners with relevant vocabulary as well as with different genres that learners may encounter in the course of their studies and careers. Skill-building and vocabulary-building activities accompany each reading. The book is accompanied by four progress tests, one test for every three units. The tests are designed to be conducted online where every student can use his/her username and password to do the tests and gets his results at the end of the test. The usernames and passwords appear on every copy of the books and are valid for one user only and not to be shared, i.e. the student who holds the original copy can access the website and do the relevant test. An important goal of English for Agricultural Sciences is to help students become confident readers by increasing their vocabulary base and improving their word comprehension skills. It engages them in the process of reading thoughtfully and encourages them to move beyond merely passive reading. To accomplish this, the book addresses the reading process in a direct manner, and various reading and vocabulary skills are presented as part of that process. The instruction and practice with reading skills help students increase their reading fluency, and equip them with skills they need for academic achievement. Focus on vocabulary-building promotes language acquisition and academic advancement. Also, the lexical and syntactic content of the readings has been controlled. The tasks are varied, accessible, and engaging, and they provide stimuli for frequent student-teacher and student-student interaction. Student awareness of reading and thinking processes is further encouraged in many parts of the book by exercises that require students to work in pairs or small groups. In discussions with others, students formulate and articulate their ideas more precisely, and so they acquire new ways of talking and thinking about a text. These activities present opportunities for real-world contact and real-world use of language. Students are asked to write and then read each other’s work so they can experience the connection between reading and writing. Speaking and writing skills are practiced through the ‘Discussion Questions and Discussing the Reading’ sections where questions can be dealt with orally and in writing.
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English for Architecture and Interior Design, Elementary Level

Published on 2017
$40.00
Architecture and Interior Design English for Architecture and Interior Design is a two-level-reading textbook for students of English as a Foreign Language (EFL) who have a basic knowledge of English. It is designed primarily for Architecture and interior design students, architects, interior designers, and other professionals with an interest in learning architectural and interior design English.   English for Architecture and Interior Design is made up of twelve thematically-based units, each of which contains one reading.  skill-building and vocabulary-building activities accompany each reading.   An important goal of English for Architecture and Interior Design is to help students become confident readers by increasing their vocabulary base and improving their word-comprehension skills. It engages them in the process of reading thoughtfully and encourages them to move beyond merely passive reading. To accomplish this, the book addresses the reading process in a direct manner, and various reading and vocabulary skills are presented as part of that process. The instruction and practice with reading skills help students increase their reading fluency, and equip them with skills they need for academic achievement. Focus on vocabulary-building promotes their language acquisition and academic advancement. Also, the lexical and syntactic content of the readings has been controlled. The tasks are varied, accessible, and engaging, and they provide stimuli for frequent student-teacher and student-student interaction.   Student awareness of reading and thinking processes is further encouraged in many parts of the book by exercises which require students to work in pairs or small groups. In discussions with others, students formulate and articulate their ideas more precisely, and so they acquire new ways of talking and thinking about a text. These activities present opportunities for real-world contact and real-world use of language. Students are asked to write, and then to read each other’s work so they can experience the connection between reading and writing.   Traditionally reading classes are based on one of two approaches: in one approach, class time is primarily spent with students doing individual reading and exercise-completion; in the other, class time is devoted to group discussions of the reading and exercise-completion. Because both approaches are important, this book integrates them by alternating reading activities with speaking and/or writing activities. Within each unit, students will not only practice reading, but they will also receive instruction in various skills and strategies incorporated into the reading process.   The basic format of each unit in English for Architecture and Interior Design is as follows:        Before Reading These pre-reading questions serve to introduce the topic of the reading and get students thinking about that topic. Activating prior knowledge allows students to tap into what they already know and then build on that knowledge, and stirs curiosity. The questions allow students to interact with each other.        Vocabulary Preview A number of key words and phrases which are common in architectural and interior-design English are explained in simple English. These are followed by a fill-in-the-blanks exercise to make sure that students understand the words and can use them in context. Understanding is crucial to language acquisition.        Scanning and Skimming In this section students are asked to scan the reading for specific information, or to skim it for main ideas and other general information.        After Reading In this section a variety of skill-building and vocabulary-building exercises is introduced: determining the main idea; understanding reading structure; guessing meaning from context; recognizing contextual reference; finding topics and topic sentences; understanding signal terms; making an outline; understanding cause and effect; comparison and contrast; exemplification; classification;  understanding antonyms and synonyms, etc. These dynamic skill and vocabulary acquisition exercises ensure that students will develop and acquire the important reading skills and vocabulary needed to make them good readers.   Each unit concludes with discussion questions designed to encourage students to think about, distill, and exchange views about the information they have been presented with throughout the unit. Following the discussion, the students are sometimes requested to write down answers to the discussion questions, a place for students to reflect in writing on the learning in the unit.
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English for Architecture and Interior Design, Elementary Level

$40.00
Architecture and Interior Design English for Architecture and Interior Design is a two-level-reading textbook for students of English as a Foreign Language (EFL) who have a basic knowledge of English. It is designed primarily for Architecture and interior design students, architects, interior designers, and other professionals with an interest in learning architectural and interior design English.   English for Architecture and Interior Design is made up of twelve thematically-based units, each of which contains one reading.  skill-building and vocabulary-building activities accompany each reading.   An important goal of English for Architecture and Interior Design is to help students become confident readers by increasing their vocabulary base and improving their word-comprehension skills. It engages them in the process of reading thoughtfully and encourages them to move beyond merely passive reading. To accomplish this, the book addresses the reading process in a direct manner, and various reading and vocabulary skills are presented as part of that process. The instruction and practice with reading skills help students increase their reading fluency, and equip them with skills they need for academic achievement. Focus on vocabulary-building promotes their language acquisition and academic advancement. Also, the lexical and syntactic content of the readings has been controlled. The tasks are varied, accessible, and engaging, and they provide stimuli for frequent student-teacher and student-student interaction.   Student awareness of reading and thinking processes is further encouraged in many parts of the book by exercises which require students to work in pairs or small groups. In discussions with others, students formulate and articulate their ideas more precisely, and so they acquire new ways of talking and thinking about a text. These activities present opportunities for real-world contact and real-world use of language. Students are asked to write, and then to read each other’s work so they can experience the connection between reading and writing.   Traditionally reading classes are based on one of two approaches: in one approach, class time is primarily spent with students doing individual reading and exercise-completion; in the other, class time is devoted to group discussions of the reading and exercise-completion. Because both approaches are important, this book integrates them by alternating reading activities with speaking and/or writing activities. Within each unit, students will not only practice reading, but they will also receive instruction in various skills and strategies incorporated into the reading process.   The basic format of each unit in English for Architecture and Interior Design is as follows:        Before Reading These pre-reading questions serve to introduce the topic of the reading and get students thinking about that topic. Activating prior knowledge allows students to tap into what they already know and then build on that knowledge, and stirs curiosity. The questions allow students to interact with each other.        Vocabulary Preview A number of key words and phrases which are common in architectural and interior-design English are explained in simple English. These are followed by a fill-in-the-blanks exercise to make sure that students understand the words and can use them in context. Understanding is crucial to language acquisition.        Scanning and Skimming In this section students are asked to scan the reading for specific information, or to skim it for main ideas and other general information.        After Reading In this section a variety of skill-building and vocabulary-building exercises is introduced: determining the main idea; understanding reading structure; guessing meaning from context; recognizing contextual reference; finding topics and topic sentences; understanding signal terms; making an outline; understanding cause and effect; comparison and contrast; exemplification; classification;  understanding antonyms and synonyms, etc. These dynamic skill and vocabulary acquisition exercises ensure that students will develop and acquire the important reading skills and vocabulary needed to make them good readers.   Each unit concludes with discussion questions designed to encourage students to think about, distill, and exchange views about the information they have been presented with throughout the unit. Following the discussion, the students are sometimes requested to write down answers to the discussion questions, a place for students to reflect in writing on the learning in the unit.
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English for Architecture and Interior Design, Intermediate Level

Published on 2014
$40.00
  Architecture and Interior Design English for Architecture and Interior Design is a two-level-reading textbook for students of English as a Foreign Language (EFL) who have a basic knowledge of English. It is designed primarily for Architecture and interior design students, architects, interior designers, and other professionals with an interest in learning architectural and interior design English.   English for Architecture and Interior Design is made up of twelve thematically-based units, each of which contains one reading.  skill-building and vocabulary-building activities accompany each reading.   An important goal of English for Architecture and Interior Design is to help students become confident readers by increasing their vocabulary base and improving their word-comprehension skills. It engages them in the process of reading thoughtfully and encourages them to move beyond merely passive reading. To accomplish this, the book addresses the reading process in a direct manner, and various reading and vocabulary skills are presented as part of that process. The instruction and practice with reading skills help students increase their reading fluency, and equip them with skills they need for academic achievement. Focus on vocabulary-building promotes their language acquisition and academic advancement. Also, the lexical and syntactic content of the readings has been controlled. The tasks are varied, accessible, and engaging, and they provide stimuli for frequent student-teacher and student-student interaction.   Student awareness of reading and thinking processes is further encouraged in many parts of the book by exercises which require students to work in pairs or small groups. In discussions with others, students formulate and articulate their ideas more precisely, and so they acquire new ways of talking and thinking about a text. These activities present opportunities for real-world contact and real-world use of language. Students are asked to write, and then to read each other’s work so they can experience the connection between reading and writing.   Traditionally reading classes are based on one of two approaches: in one approach, class time is primarily spent with students doing individual reading and exercise-completion; in the other, class time is devoted to group discussions of the reading and exercise-completion. Because both approaches are important, this book integrates them by alternating reading activities with speaking and/or writing activities. Within each unit, students will not only practice reading, but they will also receive instruction in various skills and strategies incorporated into the reading process.   The basic format of each unit in English for Architecture and Interior Design is as follows:        Before Reading These pre-reading questions serve to introduce the topic of the reading and get students thinking about that topic. Activating prior knowledge allows students to tap into what they already know and then build on that knowledge, and stirs curiosity. The questions allow students to interact with each other.        Vocabulary Preview A number of key words and phrases which are common in architectural and interior-design English are explained in simple English. These are followed by a fill-in-the-blanks exercise to make sure that students understand the words and can use them in context. Understanding is crucial to language acquisition.        Scanning and Skimming In this section students are asked to scan the reading for specific information, or to skim it for main ideas and other general information.        After Reading In this section a variety of skill-building and vocabulary-building exercises is introduced: determining the main idea; understanding reading structure; guessing meaning from context; recognizing contextual reference; finding topics and topic sentences; understanding signal terms; making an outline; understanding cause and effect; comparison and contrast; exemplification; classification;  understanding antonyms and synonyms, etc. These dynamic skill and vocabulary acquisition exercises ensure that students will develop and acquire the important reading skills and vocabulary needed to make them good readers.   Each unit concludes with discussion questions designed to encourage students to think about, distill, and exchange views about the information they have been presented with throughout the unit. Following the discussion, the students are sometimes requested to write down answers to the discussion questions, a place for students to reflect in writing on the learning in the unit.
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English for Architecture and Interior Design, Intermediate Level

$40.00
  Architecture and Interior Design English for Architecture and Interior Design is a two-level-reading textbook for students of English as a Foreign Language (EFL) who have a basic knowledge of English. It is designed primarily for Architecture and interior design students, architects, interior designers, and other professionals with an interest in learning architectural and interior design English.   English for Architecture and Interior Design is made up of twelve thematically-based units, each of which contains one reading.  skill-building and vocabulary-building activities accompany each reading.   An important goal of English for Architecture and Interior Design is to help students become confident readers by increasing their vocabulary base and improving their word-comprehension skills. It engages them in the process of reading thoughtfully and encourages them to move beyond merely passive reading. To accomplish this, the book addresses the reading process in a direct manner, and various reading and vocabulary skills are presented as part of that process. The instruction and practice with reading skills help students increase their reading fluency, and equip them with skills they need for academic achievement. Focus on vocabulary-building promotes their language acquisition and academic advancement. Also, the lexical and syntactic content of the readings has been controlled. The tasks are varied, accessible, and engaging, and they provide stimuli for frequent student-teacher and student-student interaction.   Student awareness of reading and thinking processes is further encouraged in many parts of the book by exercises which require students to work in pairs or small groups. In discussions with others, students formulate and articulate their ideas more precisely, and so they acquire new ways of talking and thinking about a text. These activities present opportunities for real-world contact and real-world use of language. Students are asked to write, and then to read each other’s work so they can experience the connection between reading and writing.   Traditionally reading classes are based on one of two approaches: in one approach, class time is primarily spent with students doing individual reading and exercise-completion; in the other, class time is devoted to group discussions of the reading and exercise-completion. Because both approaches are important, this book integrates them by alternating reading activities with speaking and/or writing activities. Within each unit, students will not only practice reading, but they will also receive instruction in various skills and strategies incorporated into the reading process.   The basic format of each unit in English for Architecture and Interior Design is as follows:        Before Reading These pre-reading questions serve to introduce the topic of the reading and get students thinking about that topic. Activating prior knowledge allows students to tap into what they already know and then build on that knowledge, and stirs curiosity. The questions allow students to interact with each other.        Vocabulary Preview A number of key words and phrases which are common in architectural and interior-design English are explained in simple English. These are followed by a fill-in-the-blanks exercise to make sure that students understand the words and can use them in context. Understanding is crucial to language acquisition.        Scanning and Skimming In this section students are asked to scan the reading for specific information, or to skim it for main ideas and other general information.        After Reading In this section a variety of skill-building and vocabulary-building exercises is introduced: determining the main idea; understanding reading structure; guessing meaning from context; recognizing contextual reference; finding topics and topic sentences; understanding signal terms; making an outline; understanding cause and effect; comparison and contrast; exemplification; classification;  understanding antonyms and synonyms, etc. These dynamic skill and vocabulary acquisition exercises ensure that students will develop and acquire the important reading skills and vocabulary needed to make them good readers.   Each unit concludes with discussion questions designed to encourage students to think about, distill, and exchange views about the information they have been presented with throughout the unit. Following the discussion, the students are sometimes requested to write down answers to the discussion questions, a place for students to reflect in writing on the learning in the unit.
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English For Business and Management, Elementary Level

Published on 2010
$40.00
PREFACE          English For Business and Management, Elementary Level, is the first book in a two-level course especially designed for business and management students and professionals who are studying English as a Foreign Language (EFL) at an elementary level.   Unit Organization The book attempts to emphasize and integrate the basic skills of speaking, reading, and writing in the context of academic and everyday usage, with particular emphasis on the former.  Grammar, arising from the reading passages, is restricted so as to aid consolidation of the above basic skills.  The introduction of language is carefully controlled in accordance with the principles of elementary language acquisition.  Vocabulary items are systematically treated in each unit, and lexical items are recycled throughout the book as frequently as possible. The reading passages have been carefully selected so as to remain within the elementary level of language instruction.  They are arranged in ten units.  Each unit is preceded by a five- to ten-minute oral exercise to motivate the reading lesson.  The introductory questions serve to present the topic of the unit, to stimulate interest, and to involve students actively in the lesson.  A vocabulary preview explains difficult or unusual vocabulary items from the text and gives practice with a gap-fill exercise.  Associated with the reading are exercises that develop and reinforce effective reading strategies:  skimming and scanning, getting the main idea, finding specific information, classification, cause and effect, comparison and contrast, outlining, referencing, etcTechniques for identifying, reading, and understanding the given form of organization are explained.  Specific grammar points from the reading passages lead to writing and speaking exercises.  Finally, each unit concludes with a listening exercise on related business topics recorded on an audio CD.
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English For Business and Management, Elementary Level

$40.00
PREFACE          English For Business and Management, Elementary Level, is the first book in a two-level course especially designed for business and management students and professionals who are studying English as a Foreign Language (EFL) at an elementary level.   Unit Organization The book attempts to emphasize and integrate the basic skills of speaking, reading, and writing in the context of academic and everyday usage, with particular emphasis on the former.  Grammar, arising from the reading passages, is restricted so as to aid consolidation of the above basic skills.  The introduction of language is carefully controlled in accordance with the principles of elementary language acquisition.  Vocabulary items are systematically treated in each unit, and lexical items are recycled throughout the book as frequently as possible. The reading passages have been carefully selected so as to remain within the elementary level of language instruction.  They are arranged in ten units.  Each unit is preceded by a five- to ten-minute oral exercise to motivate the reading lesson.  The introductory questions serve to present the topic of the unit, to stimulate interest, and to involve students actively in the lesson.  A vocabulary preview explains difficult or unusual vocabulary items from the text and gives practice with a gap-fill exercise.  Associated with the reading are exercises that develop and reinforce effective reading strategies:  skimming and scanning, getting the main idea, finding specific information, classification, cause and effect, comparison and contrast, outlining, referencing, etcTechniques for identifying, reading, and understanding the given form of organization are explained.  Specific grammar points from the reading passages lead to writing and speaking exercises.  Finally, each unit concludes with a listening exercise on related business topics recorded on an audio CD.
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ENGLISH FOR BUSINESS AND MANAGEMENT, INTERMEDIATE LEVEL

Published on 2008
$40.00
PREFACE Welcome to the second edition of English For Business and Management, Intermediate Level. This new edition is the product of constant revision and evaluation, not only by me, but also by the many instructors who, along with their students, have used the previous edition and have sent in valuable suggestions and comments. The success of the previous edition has been due, in large measure, to the honest and careful appraisal given by instructors and their students.               English For Business and Management, Intermediate Level, is an integrated text designed for business and management students and professionals who study English as a Foreign Language (EFL) at an intermediate level.   Unit Organization The book emphasizes and integrates the basic skills of speaking, reading, and writing in the context of academic and everyday usage, with particular emphasis on the former. Grammar instruction arising from the reading passages is limited so as to aid consolidation of the above skills. The introduction of language is carefully controlled in accordance with the principles of intermediate language acquisition. Vocabulary items are systematically treated in each unit, and lexical items are recycled throughout the book as frequently as possible. The reading passages have been carefully selected so as to remain within the intermediate level of language instruction. They are arranged in eight units. Each unit is preceded by a five to ten minute oral exercise to motivate the reading lesson. The introductory questions serve to present the topic of the unit, to stimulate interest, and to involve students actively in the lesson. Vocabulary Preview explains difficult or unusual vocabulary items from the text. There are also gap-fill exercises, and exercises on skimming and scanning. Following the reading, there are more exercises on areas that develop and reinforce effective reading strategies: specific information, general ideas, classification, cause and effect, comparison and contrast, getting the main idea, outlining, and referencing, etc. Techniques for identifying, reading, and understanding the given form of organization are explained.  Specific grammar points from the reading passages lead on to writing and speaking exercises.
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ENGLISH FOR BUSINESS AND MANAGEMENT, INTERMEDIATE LEVEL

$40.00
PREFACE Welcome to the second edition of English For Business and Management, Intermediate Level. This new edition is the product of constant revision and evaluation, not only by me, but also by the many instructors who, along with their students, have used the previous edition and have sent in valuable suggestions and comments. The success of the previous edition has been due, in large measure, to the honest and careful appraisal given by instructors and their students.               English For Business and Management, Intermediate Level, is an integrated text designed for business and management students and professionals who study English as a Foreign Language (EFL) at an intermediate level.   Unit Organization The book emphasizes and integrates the basic skills of speaking, reading, and writing in the context of academic and everyday usage, with particular emphasis on the former. Grammar instruction arising from the reading passages is limited so as to aid consolidation of the above skills. The introduction of language is carefully controlled in accordance with the principles of intermediate language acquisition. Vocabulary items are systematically treated in each unit, and lexical items are recycled throughout the book as frequently as possible. The reading passages have been carefully selected so as to remain within the intermediate level of language instruction. They are arranged in eight units. Each unit is preceded by a five to ten minute oral exercise to motivate the reading lesson. The introductory questions serve to present the topic of the unit, to stimulate interest, and to involve students actively in the lesson. Vocabulary Preview explains difficult or unusual vocabulary items from the text. There are also gap-fill exercises, and exercises on skimming and scanning. Following the reading, there are more exercises on areas that develop and reinforce effective reading strategies: specific information, general ideas, classification, cause and effect, comparison and contrast, getting the main idea, outlining, and referencing, etc. Techniques for identifying, reading, and understanding the given form of organization are explained.  Specific grammar points from the reading passages lead on to writing and speaking exercises.
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English for Computer Science, Reading Skills, Elementary Level, Second Edition

Published on 2008
$40.00

Welcome to the second edition to ENGLISH FOR COMPUTER

SCIENCE: READING SKILLS, ELEMENTARY LEVEL! This new edition

is the product of extensive revision and evaluation, not only by myself and my

students, but by the many instructors who, along with their students, have used

the previous edition and have contributed valuable suggestions and comments.

The success of the previous edition has been due, in large measure, to the honest

and careful appraisal given by language instructors and their students.

ENGLISH FOR COMPUTER SCIENCE: READING SKILLS,

ELEMENTARY LEVEL, is an introductory reading course for computer science

students. It focuses on the real needs of students at this level for vocabulary

expansion and reading skill-building. It is designed for use in EFL

adult-education programs, universities, colleges, technical schools, and language

institutes.

ENGLISH FOR COMPUTER SCIENCE: READING SKILLS,

ELEMENTARY LEVEL, is made up of ten thematically-based units, each of

which is divided into two parts. Vocabulary-building and skill-building exercises

accompany each reading. Each unit consists of a brief pre-reading exercise and

an exercise on skimming or scanning. Following the reading passage itself, there

are post-reading exercises that focus on important reading skills: getting the main

idea; understanding the reading structure; understanding from context; recognizing

contextual reference; the topic and topic sentence; understanding general and

specific ideas; summarizing; understanding signal words; making an outline;

understanding cause and effect; comparison and contrast; classification;

exemplification; inference; and understanding sequence.

Each part of the unit concludes with a discussion designed to encourage

students to think about, distill, and discuss the information they have read

throughout the unit. Sometimes the discussion deals with a topic from outside the

reading.

An important goal of ENGLISH FOR COMPUTER SCIENCE is to

help computing students to become confident readers by increasing their

vocabulary base and improving their reading skills. It engages them in the

process of reading thoughtfully and encourages them to move beyond passive

reading.

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English for Computer Science, Reading Skills, Elementary Level, Second Edition

$40.00

Welcome to the second edition to ENGLISH FOR COMPUTER

SCIENCE: READING SKILLS, ELEMENTARY LEVEL! This new edition

is the product of extensive revision and evaluation, not only by myself and my

students, but by the many instructors who, along with their students, have used

the previous edition and have contributed valuable suggestions and comments.

The success of the previous edition has been due, in large measure, to the honest

and careful appraisal given by language instructors and their students.

ENGLISH FOR COMPUTER SCIENCE: READING SKILLS,

ELEMENTARY LEVEL, is an introductory reading course for computer science

students. It focuses on the real needs of students at this level for vocabulary

expansion and reading skill-building. It is designed for use in EFL

adult-education programs, universities, colleges, technical schools, and language

institutes.

ENGLISH FOR COMPUTER SCIENCE: READING SKILLS,

ELEMENTARY LEVEL, is made up of ten thematically-based units, each of

which is divided into two parts. Vocabulary-building and skill-building exercises

accompany each reading. Each unit consists of a brief pre-reading exercise and

an exercise on skimming or scanning. Following the reading passage itself, there

are post-reading exercises that focus on important reading skills: getting the main

idea; understanding the reading structure; understanding from context; recognizing

contextual reference; the topic and topic sentence; understanding general and

specific ideas; summarizing; understanding signal words; making an outline;

understanding cause and effect; comparison and contrast; classification;

exemplification; inference; and understanding sequence.

Each part of the unit concludes with a discussion designed to encourage

students to think about, distill, and discuss the information they have read

throughout the unit. Sometimes the discussion deals with a topic from outside the

reading.

An important goal of ENGLISH FOR COMPUTER SCIENCE is to

help computing students to become confident readers by increasing their

vocabulary base and improving their reading skills. It engages them in the

process of reading thoughtfully and encourages them to move beyond passive

reading.

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English for Computer Science, Reading Skills, Intermediate Level, Second Edition

Published on 2008
$40.00

Welcome to the second edition to ENGLISH FOR COMPUTER SCIENCE: READING SKILLS, INTERMEDIATE LEVEL! This new edition is the product of extensive revision and evaluation, not only by myself and my students, but by the many instructors who, along with their students, have used the previous edition and have contributed valuable suggestions and comments. The success of the previous edition has been due, in large measure, to the honest and careful appraisal given by language instructors and their students.

            ENGLISH FOR COMPUTER SCIENCE, READING SKILLS, INTERMEDIATE LEVEL, is an  intermediate reading course for computer science students. It focuses on the actual needs of students at this level for vocabulary expansion and reading skill-building. It is designed for use in EFL adult-education programs, universities, colleges, technical schools, and language institutes.

             ENGLISH FOR COMPUTER SCIENCE            is made up of ten thematically-based units, each of which is divided into two parts. Vocabulary-building and skill-building exercises accompany each reading. Each unit consists of a brief pre-reading exercise and an exercise on skimming or scanning. Following the reading passage itself, there are post-reading exercises that focus on important reading skills: getting the main idea; understanding the reading’s structure; understanding meaning from context; recognizing contextual reference; finding the topic and topic sentence; understanding general and specific ideas; understanding signal words; making an outline; and understanding cause and effect, comparison and contrast, classification, inference, etc.

            Each part of the unit concludes with a discussion question designed to encourage students to think about, distill, and discuss the information they have read about throughout the unit. Sometimes the discussion deals with a topic from outside the reading. An important goal of ENGLISH FOR COMPUTER SCIENCE is to help computing students to become confident readers by increasing their vocabulary base and improving their reading skills. It engages them in the process of reading thoughtfully and encourages them to move beyond passive reading.

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English for Computer Science, Reading Skills, Intermediate Level, Second Edition

$40.00

Welcome to the second edition to ENGLISH FOR COMPUTER SCIENCE: READING SKILLS, INTERMEDIATE LEVEL! This new edition is the product of extensive revision and evaluation, not only by myself and my students, but by the many instructors who, along with their students, have used the previous edition and have contributed valuable suggestions and comments. The success of the previous edition has been due, in large measure, to the honest and careful appraisal given by language instructors and their students.

            ENGLISH FOR COMPUTER SCIENCE, READING SKILLS, INTERMEDIATE LEVEL, is an  intermediate reading course for computer science students. It focuses on the actual needs of students at this level for vocabulary expansion and reading skill-building. It is designed for use in EFL adult-education programs, universities, colleges, technical schools, and language institutes.

             ENGLISH FOR COMPUTER SCIENCE            is made up of ten thematically-based units, each of which is divided into two parts. Vocabulary-building and skill-building exercises accompany each reading. Each unit consists of a brief pre-reading exercise and an exercise on skimming or scanning. Following the reading passage itself, there are post-reading exercises that focus on important reading skills: getting the main idea; understanding the reading’s structure; understanding meaning from context; recognizing contextual reference; finding the topic and topic sentence; understanding general and specific ideas; understanding signal words; making an outline; and understanding cause and effect, comparison and contrast, classification, inference, etc.

            Each part of the unit concludes with a discussion question designed to encourage students to think about, distill, and discuss the information they have read about throughout the unit. Sometimes the discussion deals with a topic from outside the reading. An important goal of ENGLISH FOR COMPUTER SCIENCE is to help computing students to become confident readers by increasing their vocabulary base and improving their reading skills. It engages them in the process of reading thoughtfully and encourages them to move beyond passive reading.

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ENGLISH FOR COMPUTER SCIENCE: READING SKILLS, ELEMENTARY LEVEL! Third Edition

Published on 2022
$40.00
  English for Computer Sciences is designed for: - students of Computer Science in technical colleges and universities, - people working with computers who want to improve their knowledge of English for study - because people need to use English-language manuals, textbooks, and reference works - because people plan to work in an English-speaking environment 2 Objectives English for Computer Sciences aims at skill improvement:
  • Speaking - to communicate about computing topics
  • Reading - to understand a wide variety of texts including diagrams, tables, and
advertisements - to compare different sources of information, written and spoken - to develop and build reading strategies and skills - to understand the reading structure - to learn and practice scanning and skimming skills - to recognize the main ideas and general purposes of reading passages - to understand signal words - to recognize the contextual reference - to understand cause and effect, comparison and contrast, classification, exemplification, inference, and sequence
  • Writing - to write descriptions and explanations of processes
- to write summaries of longer texts - to make outlines - to write answers to discussion questions in complete sentences 3 Author This book has been written by a prolific ESP writer authoring 115 ESP textbooks. Care has been taken to ensure that the book is methodologically sound and at the same time that the technical content is correct and up-to-date. Recent important developments in computing are included. 4 Textbook design This textbook is designed to meet the requirements of both teachers and students. The author recognizes that very few English teachers have specialist knowledge of computing. He also recognizes that the students who use this book want some exposure to the kind of texts used by their fellows in English-speaking countries. The materials used in this book, therefore, consist of genuine computer materials adapted to be appropriate to the level. 5 Organization This textbook contains 12 units thematically based units, each of which consists of one reading passage. Each unit begins starts with a brief pre-reading exercise followed by a vocabulary preview section where keywords and phrases are explained and illustrated in several sentences. Various types of exercises are used to make sure that students have understood and seen these words and phrases in new contexts. Scanning for specific information and/or skimming for main ideas exercises precede the reading. Following the reading passage itself, there are post-reading exercises that focus on important reading skills: reading comprehension, getting the main idea; understanding the reading structure; understanding from context; recognizing contextual reference; understanding the topic and topic sentence; understanding general and specific ideas; summarizing; understanding signal words; making an outline; understanding cause and effect; understanding comparison and contrast; practicing classification; and understanding exemplification, inference, and sequence. Each part of the unit concludes with a discussion designed to encourage students to think about, distill, and discuss the information they have read throughout the unit. Sometimes the discussion deals with a topic from outside the reading. An important goal of ENGLISH FOR COMPUTER SCIENCE is to help computing students to become confident readers by increasing their vocabulary base and improving their reading skills. It engages them in the process of reading thoughtfully and encourages them to move beyond passive reading. The book contains a glossary of technical terms along with their definitions as a handy reference of the terms used in this book. 6 Sections Getting Ready This section contains starter activities. It is intended to start students thinking about the topic of the unit and to encourage them to share both relevant language and knowledge of the topic. Reading All units contain one computer-related reading passage. The activities which accompany passages are designed to improve both extensive reading skills (more speed, less attention to detail) and intensive reading skills (less speed, more attention to detail). Because the texts are authentic and technical, each unit contains a vocabulary preview that explains keywords used in the reading along with several sentences illustrating their usage as well as their pronunciation and parts of speech. Speaking These activities are for fluency through practice, not accuracy. The real importance of these activities lies in the communicative process. Often students will not understand each other at first. It is important that they develop strategies for coping with not understanding and not being understood. For example, they should be encouraged to ask for clarification when they do not understand and to try rephrasing when they do not understand. VI Writing The various types of writing exercises concentrate on reinforcing language use. Spelling As the texts in English for Computer Sciences are authentic and come from a variety of sources, some inconsistencies in spelling and punctuation will be found. The publisher has not attempted to standardize these, since students will be exposed to such inconsistencies in their professional lives. Certain words deserve special mention. In British texts on computing the American spelling, analog is fast becoming standard, whereas the British texts on electronics analogue are almost always used. The spelling of disk/disc varies widely. The usual forms are: compact disc; hard/floppy disk, disk drive, etc.
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ENGLISH FOR COMPUTER SCIENCE: READING SKILLS, ELEMENTARY LEVEL! Third Edition

$40.00
  English for Computer Sciences is designed for: - students of Computer Science in technical colleges and universities, - people working with computers who want to improve their knowledge of English for study - because people need to use English-language manuals, textbooks, and reference works - because people plan to work in an English-speaking environment 2 Objectives English for Computer Sciences aims at skill improvement:
  • Speaking - to communicate about computing topics
  • Reading - to understand a wide variety of texts including diagrams, tables, and
advertisements - to compare different sources of information, written and spoken - to develop and build reading strategies and skills - to understand the reading structure - to learn and practice scanning and skimming skills - to recognize the main ideas and general purposes of reading passages - to understand signal words - to recognize the contextual reference - to understand cause and effect, comparison and contrast, classification, exemplification, inference, and sequence
  • Writing - to write descriptions and explanations of processes
- to write summaries of longer texts - to make outlines - to write answers to discussion questions in complete sentences 3 Author This book has been written by a prolific ESP writer authoring 115 ESP textbooks. Care has been taken to ensure that the book is methodologically sound and at the same time that the technical content is correct and up-to-date. Recent important developments in computing are included. 4 Textbook design This textbook is designed to meet the requirements of both teachers and students. The author recognizes that very few English teachers have specialist knowledge of computing. He also recognizes that the students who use this book want some exposure to the kind of texts used by their fellows in English-speaking countries. The materials used in this book, therefore, consist of genuine computer materials adapted to be appropriate to the level. 5 Organization This textbook contains 12 units thematically based units, each of which consists of one reading passage. Each unit begins starts with a brief pre-reading exercise followed by a vocabulary preview section where keywords and phrases are explained and illustrated in several sentences. Various types of exercises are used to make sure that students have understood and seen these words and phrases in new contexts. Scanning for specific information and/or skimming for main ideas exercises precede the reading. Following the reading passage itself, there are post-reading exercises that focus on important reading skills: reading comprehension, getting the main idea; understanding the reading structure; understanding from context; recognizing contextual reference; understanding the topic and topic sentence; understanding general and specific ideas; summarizing; understanding signal words; making an outline; understanding cause and effect; understanding comparison and contrast; practicing classification; and understanding exemplification, inference, and sequence. Each part of the unit concludes with a discussion designed to encourage students to think about, distill, and discuss the information they have read throughout the unit. Sometimes the discussion deals with a topic from outside the reading. An important goal of ENGLISH FOR COMPUTER SCIENCE is to help computing students to become confident readers by increasing their vocabulary base and improving their reading skills. It engages them in the process of reading thoughtfully and encourages them to move beyond passive reading. The book contains a glossary of technical terms along with their definitions as a handy reference of the terms used in this book. 6 Sections Getting Ready This section contains starter activities. It is intended to start students thinking about the topic of the unit and to encourage them to share both relevant language and knowledge of the topic. Reading All units contain one computer-related reading passage. The activities which accompany passages are designed to improve both extensive reading skills (more speed, less attention to detail) and intensive reading skills (less speed, more attention to detail). Because the texts are authentic and technical, each unit contains a vocabulary preview that explains keywords used in the reading along with several sentences illustrating their usage as well as their pronunciation and parts of speech. Speaking These activities are for fluency through practice, not accuracy. The real importance of these activities lies in the communicative process. Often students will not understand each other at first. It is important that they develop strategies for coping with not understanding and not being understood. For example, they should be encouraged to ask for clarification when they do not understand and to try rephrasing when they do not understand. VI Writing The various types of writing exercises concentrate on reinforcing language use. Spelling As the texts in English for Computer Sciences are authentic and come from a variety of sources, some inconsistencies in spelling and punctuation will be found. The publisher has not attempted to standardize these, since students will be exposed to such inconsistencies in their professional lives. Certain words deserve special mention. In British texts on computing the American spelling, analog is fast becoming standard, whereas the British texts on electronics analogue are almost always used. The spelling of disk/disc varies widely. The usual forms are: compact disc; hard/floppy disk, disk drive, etc.
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ENGLISH FOR DENTISTRY, INTERMEDIATE LEVEL

Published on 2008
$40.00
ENGLISH FOR DENTISTRY, INTERMEDIATE LEVEL, is the second book in a two-level course especially designed for dentistry students and professionals who are studying English as a Foreign language (EFL). The text integrates the basic skills of reading, speaking, and writing in order to prepare dentistry students to understand and be able to discuss dentistry subjects at an intermediate level. The project evolved from a study of the needs of dentistry students in the Arab world. Although the book focuses on dentistry, most of the skills taught are appropriate for any academic course of study.  
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ENGLISH FOR DENTISTRY, INTERMEDIATE LEVEL

$40.00
ENGLISH FOR DENTISTRY, INTERMEDIATE LEVEL, is the second book in a two-level course especially designed for dentistry students and professionals who are studying English as a Foreign language (EFL). The text integrates the basic skills of reading, speaking, and writing in order to prepare dentistry students to understand and be able to discuss dentistry subjects at an intermediate level. The project evolved from a study of the needs of dentistry students in the Arab world. Although the book focuses on dentistry, most of the skills taught are appropriate for any academic course of study.  
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English FOR ENGINEERING , Intermediate

Published on 2008
$40.00

            ENGLISH FOR ENGINEERING, READING SKILLS,  INTERMEDIATE LEVEL, is a two-level reading course designed for engineering students at the intermediate level. It focuses on the needs of students at that level for vocabulary expansion and reading skill-building. It is designed for use in EFL adult-education programs, universities, engineering colleges, and technical schools.

            ENGLISH FOR ENGINEERING, READING SKILLS, INTERMEDIATE LEVEL, is made up of twelve thematically-based units. Vocabulary-building and skill-building exercises accompany each reading. Each unit consists of a brief pre-reading exercise and an exercise on skimming or scanning. Following the reading passage itself, there are post-reading exercises that focus on important reading skills: getting the main idea, understanding the reading structure, understanding meaning from context, recognizing contextual reference, finding the topic and topic sentence, understanding general and specific ideas, summarizing, understanding signal words, making an outline, understanding cause and effect, comparison and contrast, classification, inference, exemplification, understanding chronological order, etc.

            Each unit concludes with a discussion question designed to encourage students to think about, distill, and discuss the information they have read about throughout the unit. After the discussion, students write the answers to the questions in a paragraph form.

            The topics have been selected from a wide range of authentic engineering  materials encompassing various engineering branches - civil engineering, mechanical engineering, electrical engineering, architectural engineering, marine engineering, materials engineering, electronics engineering,  etc. The book is intended to provide students with a solid foundation in engineering generally to enable them to comprehend and communicate using engineering language.

            An important goal of English For Engineering is to help engineering students to become confident readers by increasing their vocabulary base and improving their reading skills. It engages them in the process of reading thoughtfully and encourages them to move beyond passive reading.

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English FOR ENGINEERING , Intermediate

$40.00

            ENGLISH FOR ENGINEERING, READING SKILLS,  INTERMEDIATE LEVEL, is a two-level reading course designed for engineering students at the intermediate level. It focuses on the needs of students at that level for vocabulary expansion and reading skill-building. It is designed for use in EFL adult-education programs, universities, engineering colleges, and technical schools.

            ENGLISH FOR ENGINEERING, READING SKILLS, INTERMEDIATE LEVEL, is made up of twelve thematically-based units. Vocabulary-building and skill-building exercises accompany each reading. Each unit consists of a brief pre-reading exercise and an exercise on skimming or scanning. Following the reading passage itself, there are post-reading exercises that focus on important reading skills: getting the main idea, understanding the reading structure, understanding meaning from context, recognizing contextual reference, finding the topic and topic sentence, understanding general and specific ideas, summarizing, understanding signal words, making an outline, understanding cause and effect, comparison and contrast, classification, inference, exemplification, understanding chronological order, etc.

            Each unit concludes with a discussion question designed to encourage students to think about, distill, and discuss the information they have read about throughout the unit. After the discussion, students write the answers to the questions in a paragraph form.

            The topics have been selected from a wide range of authentic engineering  materials encompassing various engineering branches - civil engineering, mechanical engineering, electrical engineering, architectural engineering, marine engineering, materials engineering, electronics engineering,  etc. The book is intended to provide students with a solid foundation in engineering generally to enable them to comprehend and communicate using engineering language.

            An important goal of English For Engineering is to help engineering students to become confident readers by increasing their vocabulary base and improving their reading skills. It engages them in the process of reading thoughtfully and encourages them to move beyond passive reading.

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English for Engineering ,Elementary Level

Published on 2006
$40.00
ENGLISH FOR ENGINEERING, READING SKILLS, ELEMENTARY LEVEL, is an introductory reading course for engineerinmg students. It focuses on the real needs of students at this level for vocabulary expansion and reading skill-building. It is designed for use in EFL adult-education programs, universities, engineering colleges and technical schools.             ENGLISH FOR ENGINEERING is made up of fifteen thematically based units, each of which is divided into two parts. Vocabulary-building and skill-building exercises accompany each reading. Each unit consists of a brief pre-reading exercise and an exercise on skimming or scanning. Following the reading passage itself, there are post-reading exercises that focus on important reading skills: getting the main idea, understanding the reading structure, understanding meaning from context, recognizing contextual reference, finding the topic and topic sentence, understanding general and specific ideas, summarizing, understanding signal words, making an outling, understanding cause and effect, comparison and contrast, classification, inference, exemplification, understanding chronological order, etc. Each unit concludes with a discussion question designed to encourage students to think about, distill, and discuss the information they have read about throughout the unit. Simetimes the discussion deals with a topic from outside the reading. The topics have been selected from a wide range of authentic engineering  materials encompassing various engineering branches - civil engineering, mechanical engineering, electrical engineering, architectural engineering, marine engineering, material engineering, electronics engineering,  etc. The book is intended to provide students with a solid foundation in engineering in general to enable them to comprehend and communicate using engineering language. An important goal of ENGLISH FOR ENGINEERING is to help  engineering students to become confident readers by increasing their vocabulary base and improving their reading skills. It engages them in the process of reading thoughtfully and encourages them to move beyond passive reading.
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English for Engineering ,Elementary Level

$40.00
ENGLISH FOR ENGINEERING, READING SKILLS, ELEMENTARY LEVEL, is an introductory reading course for engineerinmg students. It focuses on the real needs of students at this level for vocabulary expansion and reading skill-building. It is designed for use in EFL adult-education programs, universities, engineering colleges and technical schools.             ENGLISH FOR ENGINEERING is made up of fifteen thematically based units, each of which is divided into two parts. Vocabulary-building and skill-building exercises accompany each reading. Each unit consists of a brief pre-reading exercise and an exercise on skimming or scanning. Following the reading passage itself, there are post-reading exercises that focus on important reading skills: getting the main idea, understanding the reading structure, understanding meaning from context, recognizing contextual reference, finding the topic and topic sentence, understanding general and specific ideas, summarizing, understanding signal words, making an outling, understanding cause and effect, comparison and contrast, classification, inference, exemplification, understanding chronological order, etc. Each unit concludes with a discussion question designed to encourage students to think about, distill, and discuss the information they have read about throughout the unit. Simetimes the discussion deals with a topic from outside the reading. The topics have been selected from a wide range of authentic engineering  materials encompassing various engineering branches - civil engineering, mechanical engineering, electrical engineering, architectural engineering, marine engineering, material engineering, electronics engineering,  etc. The book is intended to provide students with a solid foundation in engineering in general to enable them to comprehend and communicate using engineering language. An important goal of ENGLISH FOR ENGINEERING is to help  engineering students to become confident readers by increasing their vocabulary base and improving their reading skills. It engages them in the process of reading thoughtfully and encourages them to move beyond passive reading.
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English for Engineering, Reading Skills, Elementary Level

Published on 2018
$40.00

ENGLISH FOR ENGINEERING:

READING SKILLS, ELEMENTARY LEVEL! This new edition has undergone

major improvements and is the product of extensive revision and evaluation, not

only by myself and my students, but by the many instructors who, along with

their students, have used the previous edition and have contributed valuable

suggestions and comments. The success of the previous edition has been due, in

large measure, to the honest and careful appraisal given by language instructors

and their students.

ENGLISH FOR ENGINEERING: READING SKILLS,

ELEMENTARY LEVEL, is an introductory reading course for engineering

students. It focuses on the vocabulary expansion and reading skill-building

needs of students at this level. It is designed for use in EFL adult-education

programs, universities, engineering colleges and technical schools.

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Add to Wishlist

English for Engineering, Reading Skills, Elementary Level

$40.00

ENGLISH FOR ENGINEERING:

READING SKILLS, ELEMENTARY LEVEL! This new edition has undergone

major improvements and is the product of extensive revision and evaluation, not

only by myself and my students, but by the many instructors who, along with

their students, have used the previous edition and have contributed valuable

suggestions and comments. The success of the previous edition has been due, in

large measure, to the honest and careful appraisal given by language instructors

and their students.

ENGLISH FOR ENGINEERING: READING SKILLS,

ELEMENTARY LEVEL, is an introductory reading course for engineering

students. It focuses on the vocabulary expansion and reading skill-building

needs of students at this level. It is designed for use in EFL adult-education

programs, universities, engineering colleges and technical schools.

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English for Engineering, Reading Skills, Intermediate Level

Published on 2018
$40.00

ENGLISH FOR ENGINEERING, READING SKILLS, is a two level

reading course designed for engineering students at the intermediate level.

It focuses on the needs of students at that level for vocabulary expansion and

reading skill-building. It is designed for use in EFL adult-education programs,

universities, engineering colleges, and technical schools.

ENGLISH FOR ENGINEERING, READING SKILLS,

INTERMEDIATE LEVEL, Second Edition, has undergone major

improvements and is made up of twelve thematically-based units and four

progress tests, each covering three preceding units. Vocabulary-building and

skill-building exercises accompany each reading. Each unit consists of a brief

pre-reading exercise and an exercise on skimming or scanning. Following

the reading passage itself, there are post-reading exercises that focus on

important reading skills: getting the main idea, understanding the reading

structure, understanding meaning from context, recognizing contextual

reference, finding the topic and topic sentence, understanding general and

specific ideas, summarizing, understanding signal words, making an outline,

understanding cause and effect, comparison and contrast, classification,

inference, exemplification, understanding chronological order, etc.40

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English for Engineering, Reading Skills, Intermediate Level

$40.00

ENGLISH FOR ENGINEERING, READING SKILLS, is a two level

reading course designed for engineering students at the intermediate level.

It focuses on the needs of students at that level for vocabulary expansion and

reading skill-building. It is designed for use in EFL adult-education programs,

universities, engineering colleges, and technical schools.

ENGLISH FOR ENGINEERING, READING SKILLS,

INTERMEDIATE LEVEL, Second Edition, has undergone major

improvements and is made up of twelve thematically-based units and four

progress tests, each covering three preceding units. Vocabulary-building and

skill-building exercises accompany each reading. Each unit consists of a brief

pre-reading exercise and an exercise on skimming or scanning. Following

the reading passage itself, there are post-reading exercises that focus on

important reading skills: getting the main idea, understanding the reading

structure, understanding meaning from context, recognizing contextual

reference, finding the topic and topic sentence, understanding general and

specific ideas, summarizing, understanding signal words, making an outline,

understanding cause and effect, comparison and contrast, classification,

inference, exemplification, understanding chronological order, etc.40

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English for Health Sciences, Reading Skills, Elementary Level, Fourth Edition

Published on 2008
$40.00
PREFACE Welcome to the fourth edition to English For Health Sciences: Reading Skills, Elementary Level! This new edition is the product of constant revision and evaluation, not only by myself and my students, but by the many instructors who, along with their students, have used the previous edition and have contributed valuable suggestions and comments. The success of the previous edition has been due, in large measure, to the honest and careful appraisal given by language instructors and their students. This book is an English language text constructed for use in health colleges and institutes and adult English Language training programmes. The aim of the series is to prepare students to participate in health science courses. This text is structured at the elementary level of students of English as a Foreign Language (EFL). It focuses on reading skills with the aim of facilitating the leap from basic English to academic English and preparing students to handle health science materials with confidence. The topics have been selected from a wide range of authentic writings including health science curricula, as well as medical journals and textbooks to serve as vehicles for developing reading with its associated skills in an interesting and informative way. Unit Organization Because the book’s primary purpose is to develop the reading process, it offers a large variety of exercises and activities directed at reading. Each of the ten units consists of a brief pre-reading exercise and an exercise on skimming or scanning. Following the reading itself, there are post-reading exercises that focus on important reading skills that include: Getting the main idea of a text Understanding meaning in context Understanding reading structure Identifying specific information Identifying general ideas Recognizing contextual reference Understanding signal words Making an outline Summarizing Making notes Classifying Comparing and contrasting Identifying cause and effect Describing Identifying examples Understanding stems and affixes Using a dictionary Increasing reading speed Discussing questions that relate the reading selection to the students’ own lives, allowing for some conversation. To the Teacher Having some idea of the subject matter is clearly an important aspect of active reading. To this end, students need to be encouraged to look at and discuss the pictures in the Before You Read and Getting Started sections and to attempt to answer the accompanying questions. When tackling the reading selections themselves, students should read silently. This speeds up their reading and also closely parallels the established approach to the reading of academic texts. Encouraging the students to “unhinge” their minds from their lips – i.e., not to pronounce words as they read – is an additional means of increasing their reading speed. Not allowing them a dictionary for the initial reading will force them to extract the meanings of words from their context in the passage itself. Stress the importance of homing in on the central idea of the text. As an alternative to this approach, you may occasionally wish to read out the text (or play a recording of it) while the students follow it in their books. Whichever approach is used, the passage should be read through in full, without explanation. The readings are followed by a variety of exercises in the After You Read section. These are intended to help students to consolidate, in English, the very same skills they are assumed to possess in their own language. Again, the emphasis is on grasping the main idea and guessing meaning from context – a sometimes bewildering but ultimately rewarding experience for many students who have developed a slavish reliance on their dictionaries. They need to learn that trying to find out the exact meaning of a word is not always necessary and can even be counter-productive if the word has subtly acquired a different shade of meaning in a new context. Although students are instructed to re-read the selection after doing the Guessing Meaning from Context exercises, towards the end of the book you might wish to consider having them mark the passage after reading it just once – an approach commonly followed in courses in tertiary education, where the sheer volume of reading to be covered often limits the student to no more than a single reading of a chapter. Should you decide on more than one reading, restrict dictionary usage to an absolute minimum, often as a last resort. In the Getting the Main Idea sections, students practise finding the topic sentence of a paragraph. The Building Vocabulary exercises can be assigned as homework, but the Study Skills activities should be completed in class, particularly those dealing with increasing reading speed. Students are given free rein in practising newly-acquired vocabulary when they express their opinion in the Discussing the Reading section. This may be handled in a number of ways. For example: The teacher asks questions of the entire class. The advantage of this approach is teacher control of the discussion – to direct and add to it. A common problem arises with an unresponsive group of students who may be too embarrassed to speak out. The students discuss answers in small groups. A representative of each group then reports the group’s findings to the entire class. For very shy students, pairs of students may be preferable. One selected question is chosen for a debate. The class is then divided into two teams who prepare points for their team. Contents Unit 1 Arab Hospitals Unit 2 Structure and Function of the Heart Unit 3 Diet Unit 4 Medicines and Drugs Unit 5 Americans’ Use of Medication Unit 6 Infections Unit 7 The Common Cold Unit 8 Stress Unit 9 Revision Unit 10 Caffeine and Coffee Reading: Caffeine and Coffee Unit 11 Why Have They Not Found a Cure Unit 12 First Aid Unit 13 Accidents Unit 14 Headaches Unit 15 Why Do People Smoke? Unit 16 High Blood Pressure Unit 17 Why Do Children Get Chickenpox? Unit 18 Revision
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English for Health Sciences, Reading Skills, Elementary Level, Fourth Edition

$40.00
PREFACE Welcome to the fourth edition to English For Health Sciences: Reading Skills, Elementary Level! This new edition is the product of constant revision and evaluation, not only by myself and my students, but by the many instructors who, along with their students, have used the previous edition and have contributed valuable suggestions and comments. The success of the previous edition has been due, in large measure, to the honest and careful appraisal given by language instructors and their students. This book is an English language text constructed for use in health colleges and institutes and adult English Language training programmes. The aim of the series is to prepare students to participate in health science courses. This text is structured at the elementary level of students of English as a Foreign Language (EFL). It focuses on reading skills with the aim of facilitating the leap from basic English to academic English and preparing students to handle health science materials with confidence. The topics have been selected from a wide range of authentic writings including health science curricula, as well as medical journals and textbooks to serve as vehicles for developing reading with its associated skills in an interesting and informative way. Unit Organization Because the book’s primary purpose is to develop the reading process, it offers a large variety of exercises and activities directed at reading. Each of the ten units consists of a brief pre-reading exercise and an exercise on skimming or scanning. Following the reading itself, there are post-reading exercises that focus on important reading skills that include: Getting the main idea of a text Understanding meaning in context Understanding reading structure Identifying specific information Identifying general ideas Recognizing contextual reference Understanding signal words Making an outline Summarizing Making notes Classifying Comparing and contrasting Identifying cause and effect Describing Identifying examples Understanding stems and affixes Using a dictionary Increasing reading speed Discussing questions that relate the reading selection to the students’ own lives, allowing for some conversation. To the Teacher Having some idea of the subject matter is clearly an important aspect of active reading. To this end, students need to be encouraged to look at and discuss the pictures in the Before You Read and Getting Started sections and to attempt to answer the accompanying questions. When tackling the reading selections themselves, students should read silently. This speeds up their reading and also closely parallels the established approach to the reading of academic texts. Encouraging the students to “unhinge” their minds from their lips – i.e., not to pronounce words as they read – is an additional means of increasing their reading speed. Not allowing them a dictionary for the initial reading will force them to extract the meanings of words from their context in the passage itself. Stress the importance of homing in on the central idea of the text. As an alternative to this approach, you may occasionally wish to read out the text (or play a recording of it) while the students follow it in their books. Whichever approach is used, the passage should be read through in full, without explanation. The readings are followed by a variety of exercises in the After You Read section. These are intended to help students to consolidate, in English, the very same skills they are assumed to possess in their own language. Again, the emphasis is on grasping the main idea and guessing meaning from context – a sometimes bewildering but ultimately rewarding experience for many students who have developed a slavish reliance on their dictionaries. They need to learn that trying to find out the exact meaning of a word is not always necessary and can even be counter-productive if the word has subtly acquired a different shade of meaning in a new context. Although students are instructed to re-read the selection after doing the Guessing Meaning from Context exercises, towards the end of the book you might wish to consider having them mark the passage after reading it just once – an approach commonly followed in courses in tertiary education, where the sheer volume of reading to be covered often limits the student to no more than a single reading of a chapter. Should you decide on more than one reading, restrict dictionary usage to an absolute minimum, often as a last resort. In the Getting the Main Idea sections, students practise finding the topic sentence of a paragraph. The Building Vocabulary exercises can be assigned as homework, but the Study Skills activities should be completed in class, particularly those dealing with increasing reading speed. Students are given free rein in practising newly-acquired vocabulary when they express their opinion in the Discussing the Reading section. This may be handled in a number of ways. For example: The teacher asks questions of the entire class. The advantage of this approach is teacher control of the discussion – to direct and add to it. A common problem arises with an unresponsive group of students who may be too embarrassed to speak out. The students discuss answers in small groups. A representative of each group then reports the group’s findings to the entire class. For very shy students, pairs of students may be preferable. One selected question is chosen for a debate. The class is then divided into two teams who prepare points for their team. Contents Unit 1 Arab Hospitals Unit 2 Structure and Function of the Heart Unit 3 Diet Unit 4 Medicines and Drugs Unit 5 Americans’ Use of Medication Unit 6 Infections Unit 7 The Common Cold Unit 8 Stress Unit 9 Revision Unit 10 Caffeine and Coffee Reading: Caffeine and Coffee Unit 11 Why Have They Not Found a Cure Unit 12 First Aid Unit 13 Accidents Unit 14 Headaches Unit 15 Why Do People Smoke? Unit 16 High Blood Pressure Unit 17 Why Do Children Get Chickenpox? Unit 18 Revision
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English for Health Sciences, Reading Skills, Elementary Level. Fifth Edition

Published on 2019
$40.00

English for Health Sciences: Reading Skills, Elementary Level! This new edition has undergone major improvements and is the product of constant revision and evaluation, not only by myself and my students, but by the many instructors who, along with their students, have used the previous edition and have contributed valuable suggestions and comments.

The success of the previous edition has been due, in large measure, to the honest and careful appraisal given by language instructors and their students.

English for Health Sciences: Reading Skills, Elementary Level is an English language text constructed for use in health colleges and institutes and adult English Language training programmes. The aim of the series is to prepare students to participate in health science courses. This text is structured at the elementary level of students of English as a Foreign Language (EFL). It focuses on reading skills with the aim of facilitating the leap from basic English to academic English and preparing students to handle health science materials with confidence.

Unit Organization

English for Health Sciences: Reading Skills, Elementary Level is made up twelve units and three progress tests. To do the tests, the student has to login on to professorsuleimanmazyad.com using his/her username and password which he/she can create using the code that appears on the back cover of the book.

Because the book’s primary purpose is to develop one’s reading ability, it offers a large variety of exercises and activities directed at reading. Each unit consists of a brief pre-reading exercise and an exercise on skimming or scanning. Following the reading passage itself, there are post-reading exercises that focus on important reading skills: getting the main idea, understanding the reading structure, understanding meaning from context, recognizing contextual reference, finding the topic and topic sentence, understanding general and specific ideas, summarizing, understanding signal words, making an outline, understanding cause and effect, comparison and contrast, classification, inference, exemplification, understanding stems and affixes, using a dictionary, increasing one’s reading speed, etc.

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English for Health Sciences, Reading Skills, Elementary Level. Fifth Edition

$40.00

English for Health Sciences: Reading Skills, Elementary Level! This new edition has undergone major improvements and is the product of constant revision and evaluation, not only by myself and my students, but by the many instructors who, along with their students, have used the previous edition and have contributed valuable suggestions and comments.

The success of the previous edition has been due, in large measure, to the honest and careful appraisal given by language instructors and their students.

English for Health Sciences: Reading Skills, Elementary Level is an English language text constructed for use in health colleges and institutes and adult English Language training programmes. The aim of the series is to prepare students to participate in health science courses. This text is structured at the elementary level of students of English as a Foreign Language (EFL). It focuses on reading skills with the aim of facilitating the leap from basic English to academic English and preparing students to handle health science materials with confidence.

Unit Organization

English for Health Sciences: Reading Skills, Elementary Level is made up twelve units and three progress tests. To do the tests, the student has to login on to professorsuleimanmazyad.com using his/her username and password which he/she can create using the code that appears on the back cover of the book.

Because the book’s primary purpose is to develop one’s reading ability, it offers a large variety of exercises and activities directed at reading. Each unit consists of a brief pre-reading exercise and an exercise on skimming or scanning. Following the reading passage itself, there are post-reading exercises that focus on important reading skills: getting the main idea, understanding the reading structure, understanding meaning from context, recognizing contextual reference, finding the topic and topic sentence, understanding general and specific ideas, summarizing, understanding signal words, making an outline, understanding cause and effect, comparison and contrast, classification, inference, exemplification, understanding stems and affixes, using a dictionary, increasing one’s reading speed, etc.

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English for Health Sciences, Reading Skills, Intermediate Level. Second Edition

Published on 2004
$40.00
Welcome to the second edition of English For Health Sciences, Reading Skills, Intermediate Level! This new edition is the product of constant revision and evaluation, not only by myself, but by the many instructors who, along with their students, have used the previous edition and have contributed valuable suggestions and comments. The success of the previous edition has been due, in large measure, to the honest and careful appraisal given by instructors and their students. English For Health Sciences, Reading Skills is the second in a series of English language texts constructed for use in health colleges and institutes and adult English language training programmes. The aim of the series is to prepare students to participate in medical science courses. This text is structured at the intermediate level of students of English as a Foreign Language (EFL). As with the first (elementary) text, it focuses on reading skills with the aim of facilitating the leap from basic English to academic English and preparing students to handle health science materials with confidence. The topics have been selected from a wide range of authentic writings including health science curricula, as well as medical journals and textbooks to serve as vehicles for developing reading with its associated skills in an interesting and informative way. The rationale for selecting authentic materials is to ease the students’ passage from the “safety” of ‘EFL English” to confronting the English of the “real world” in a manner that makes students aware of the control they can exercise, even with texts which are, at first sight, beyond their level of language competence. Thus, despite the daunting appearance of the readings, the tasks based on them are designed to be within the students’ abilities to carry out. This approach should encourage students to move through the book with a growing sense of confidence and accomplishment as they discover that they can find the main ideas and important details, understanding much of the new vocabulary without a dictionary and successfully applying critical thinking to their reading. Unit Organisation Because the book’s primary purpose is to develop the reading process, it offers a large variety of exercises and activities directed at reading. Individual teachers are left to make the choice of which sections best suit the specific needs of their students. Each of the sixteen units consists of a brief pre-reading exercise and an exercise on skimming or scanning. Following the reading itself, there are post-reading exercises that focus on important reading skills that include: l Getting the main idea of a text l Guessing meaning from context l Understanding reading structure l Understanding details l Finding the topic sentence l Understanding cause and effect l Recognizing contextual reference l Understanding expressions and idioms l Summarizing l Interpreting the author’s point of view l Making notes l Understanding stems and affixes l Using a dictionary l Increasing reading speed l Discussing questions that relate the reading selection to the students’ own lives, allowing for some conversation l Understanding comparison and contrast l Understanding chronological order l Understanding general and specific information Understanding classification To the Teacher Having some idea of the subject matter is clearly an important aspect of active reading. To this end, students need to be encouraged to look at and discuss the pictures in the Before You Read and Getting Started sections, and to attempt to answer the accompanying questions. When tackling the reading selection themselves, students should read silently. This speeds up their reading and also closely parallels the established approach to the reading of academic texts. Encouraging the students to “unhinge” their minds from their lips, i.e., not to pronounce words as they read – is an additional means of increasing their reading speed. Not allowing them a dictionary for the initial reading will force them to extract the meanings of words from their context in the passage itself. Stress the importance of homing in on the central idea of the text. As an alternative to this approach, you may occasionally wish to read out the text (or play a recording of it) while the students follow it in their books. Whichever approach is used, the passage should be read through in full, without explanation. The readings are followed by a variety of exercises in the After You Read section. These are intended to help students to consolidate, in English, the very same skills they are assumed to possess in their own language. Again, the emphasis is on grasping the main idea and guessing meaning from context – a sometimes bewildering but ultimately rewarding experience for many students who have developed a slavish reliance on their dictionaries. They need to learn that trying to find out the exact meaning of a word is not always necessary, and can even be counter-productive if the word has subtly acquired a different shade of meaning in a new context. Although students are instructed to re-read the selection after doing the Guessing Meaning from Context exercises, towards the end of the book you might wish to consider having them mark the passage after reading it just once – an approach commonly followed in courses in tertiary education, where the sheer volume of reading to be covered often limits the student to no more than a single reading of a chapter. Should you decide on more than one reading, restrict dictionary usage to an absolute minimum, often as a last resort. In the Getting the Main Idea section, students practise finding the topic sentence of a paragraph or, for paragraphs with no topic sentence, practise “adding up” details to work out the implied main idea. In sections on rhetorical functions, i.e., general and specific information, cause and effect, classification and comparison and contrast, etc, students are given adequate practice to understand these functions which are recycled where appropriate. The Building Vocabulary exercises can be assigned as homework, but the Study Skills activities should be completed in class, particularly those dealing with increasing reading speed. Students are given free rein in practising newly-acquired vocabulary when they express their opinion in the Discussing the Reading section. This may be handled in a number of ways. For example: The teacher asks questions of the entire class. The advantage of this approach is teacher control of the discussion – to direct and add to it. A common problem arises with an unresponsive group of students who may be too embarrassed to speak out. The students discuss answers in small groups. A representative of each group then reports the group’s findings to the entire class. For very shy students, pairs of students may be preferable. One selected question is chosen for a debate. The class is then divided into two teams who prepare points for their team.
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English for Health Sciences, Reading Skills, Intermediate Level. Second Edition

$40.00
Welcome to the second edition of English For Health Sciences, Reading Skills, Intermediate Level! This new edition is the product of constant revision and evaluation, not only by myself, but by the many instructors who, along with their students, have used the previous edition and have contributed valuable suggestions and comments. The success of the previous edition has been due, in large measure, to the honest and careful appraisal given by instructors and their students. English For Health Sciences, Reading Skills is the second in a series of English language texts constructed for use in health colleges and institutes and adult English language training programmes. The aim of the series is to prepare students to participate in medical science courses. This text is structured at the intermediate level of students of English as a Foreign Language (EFL). As with the first (elementary) text, it focuses on reading skills with the aim of facilitating the leap from basic English to academic English and preparing students to handle health science materials with confidence. The topics have been selected from a wide range of authentic writings including health science curricula, as well as medical journals and textbooks to serve as vehicles for developing reading with its associated skills in an interesting and informative way. The rationale for selecting authentic materials is to ease the students’ passage from the “safety” of ‘EFL English” to confronting the English of the “real world” in a manner that makes students aware of the control they can exercise, even with texts which are, at first sight, beyond their level of language competence. Thus, despite the daunting appearance of the readings, the tasks based on them are designed to be within the students’ abilities to carry out. This approach should encourage students to move through the book with a growing sense of confidence and accomplishment as they discover that they can find the main ideas and important details, understanding much of the new vocabulary without a dictionary and successfully applying critical thinking to their reading. Unit Organisation Because the book’s primary purpose is to develop the reading process, it offers a large variety of exercises and activities directed at reading. Individual teachers are left to make the choice of which sections best suit the specific needs of their students. Each of the sixteen units consists of a brief pre-reading exercise and an exercise on skimming or scanning. Following the reading itself, there are post-reading exercises that focus on important reading skills that include: l Getting the main idea of a text l Guessing meaning from context l Understanding reading structure l Understanding details l Finding the topic sentence l Understanding cause and effect l Recognizing contextual reference l Understanding expressions and idioms l Summarizing l Interpreting the author’s point of view l Making notes l Understanding stems and affixes l Using a dictionary l Increasing reading speed l Discussing questions that relate the reading selection to the students’ own lives, allowing for some conversation l Understanding comparison and contrast l Understanding chronological order l Understanding general and specific information Understanding classification To the Teacher Having some idea of the subject matter is clearly an important aspect of active reading. To this end, students need to be encouraged to look at and discuss the pictures in the Before You Read and Getting Started sections, and to attempt to answer the accompanying questions. When tackling the reading selection themselves, students should read silently. This speeds up their reading and also closely parallels the established approach to the reading of academic texts. Encouraging the students to “unhinge” their minds from their lips, i.e., not to pronounce words as they read – is an additional means of increasing their reading speed. Not allowing them a dictionary for the initial reading will force them to extract the meanings of words from their context in the passage itself. Stress the importance of homing in on the central idea of the text. As an alternative to this approach, you may occasionally wish to read out the text (or play a recording of it) while the students follow it in their books. Whichever approach is used, the passage should be read through in full, without explanation. The readings are followed by a variety of exercises in the After You Read section. These are intended to help students to consolidate, in English, the very same skills they are assumed to possess in their own language. Again, the emphasis is on grasping the main idea and guessing meaning from context – a sometimes bewildering but ultimately rewarding experience for many students who have developed a slavish reliance on their dictionaries. They need to learn that trying to find out the exact meaning of a word is not always necessary, and can even be counter-productive if the word has subtly acquired a different shade of meaning in a new context. Although students are instructed to re-read the selection after doing the Guessing Meaning from Context exercises, towards the end of the book you might wish to consider having them mark the passage after reading it just once – an approach commonly followed in courses in tertiary education, where the sheer volume of reading to be covered often limits the student to no more than a single reading of a chapter. Should you decide on more than one reading, restrict dictionary usage to an absolute minimum, often as a last resort. In the Getting the Main Idea section, students practise finding the topic sentence of a paragraph or, for paragraphs with no topic sentence, practise “adding up” details to work out the implied main idea. In sections on rhetorical functions, i.e., general and specific information, cause and effect, classification and comparison and contrast, etc, students are given adequate practice to understand these functions which are recycled where appropriate. The Building Vocabulary exercises can be assigned as homework, but the Study Skills activities should be completed in class, particularly those dealing with increasing reading speed. Students are given free rein in practising newly-acquired vocabulary when they express their opinion in the Discussing the Reading section. This may be handled in a number of ways. For example: The teacher asks questions of the entire class. The advantage of this approach is teacher control of the discussion – to direct and add to it. A common problem arises with an unresponsive group of students who may be too embarrassed to speak out. The students discuss answers in small groups. A representative of each group then reports the group’s findings to the entire class. For very shy students, pairs of students may be preferable. One selected question is chosen for a debate. The class is then divided into two teams who prepare points for their team.
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English for Health Sciences, Reading Skills, Lower Intermediate Level. Second Edition

Published on 2009
$40.00

English For Health Sciences -Reading Skills, Lower Intermediate Level! This new edition is the product of constant revision and evaluation, not only by me, but also by the many instructors who, along with their students, have used the previous edition and have sent in valuable suggestions and comments. The success of the previous edition has been due, in large measure, to the honest and careful appraisal given by instructors and their students.

English For Health Sciences - Reading Skills, Lower Intermediate

Level, is the second in a series of English language texts constructed for use in health colleges, institutes and adult English language-training programmes. The aim of the series is to prepare students to participate in medical science courses.

This text is structured at the lower intermediate level of students of English as a Foreign Language (EFL). As with the first (elementary) text, it focuses on reading skills with the aims of facilitating the leap from basic English to academic English and preparing students to handle health science materials with confidence.

The topics have been selected from a wide range of authentic writings

including health-science curricula, medical journals, and textbooks to serve

as vehicles for developing reading with its associated skills in an interesting

and informative way. The rationale for selecting authentic materials is to ease

the students’ passage from the ‘safety’ of EFL English to confronting the

English of the ‘real world’ in a manner that makes students aware of the

control they can exercise, even with texts which are, at first sight, beyond

their level of language competence. Thus, despite the sometimes daunting

appearance of the readings, the tasks based on them are designed to be

within the students’ abilities to carry out. This encourages students to move

through the book with a growing sense of confidence and accomplishment

as they discover that they can find the main ideas and important details,

understand much of the new vocabulary without a dictionary, and successfully

apply critical thinking to their reading.

 

Unit Organization

Because the book’s primary purpose is to develop the reading

process, it offers a wide variety of exercises and activities directed at reading.

Each of the ten units consists of two parts, and each part is composed of

a brief pre-reading exercise and an exercise on skimming or scanning.

Following the reading itself, there are post-reading exercises that focus on

important reading skills that include:

   Getting the main idea of a passage

    Guessing meaning from context

􀁺 Understanding reading structure

􀁺 Understanding details

􀁺 Finding topic sentences

􀁺 Understanding cause and effect

􀁺 Recognizing contextual reference

􀁺 Understanding expressions and idioms

􀁺 Understanding adjectival and noun phrases

􀁺 Making an outline

􀁺 Understanding stems and affixes

􀁺 Using a dictionary

􀁺 Discussing questions that relate the reading selection to the students’ own

lives, allowing for some conversation

􀁺 Understanding comparison and contrast

􀁺 Understanding general and specific information

􀁺 Understanding classification

To the Teacher

Having some idea of the subject matter is clearly an important aspect

of successful reading. To this end, students need to be encouraged to look

at and discuss the pictures in the Before You Read and Getting Started

sections, and to attempt to answer the accompanying questions.

When tackling the reading selections themselves, students should read

silently. This increases reading speed and also closely parallels the established

approach to the reading of academic texts. Encouraging the students to

‘unhinge’ their minds from their lips, i.e. not to pronounce or silently mouth

words as they read, is an additional means of increasing one’s reading speed.

Not allowing dictionary use for the initial reading forces readers to try to

extract the meanings of words from their context in the passage. Stress the

importance of homing in on the main ideas of a reading passage.

As an alternate to this approach, you may occasionally wish to read

a passage aloud (or play a recording of it) while the students follow silently

in their books. Whichever approach is used, the passage should be read

through in full, without explanation.

The readings are followed by a variety of exercises in the After

Reading sections. These are intended to help students to consolidate, in

English, the very same skills they are assumed to possess in their native

language. Again, the emphasis is on grasping the main idea and guessing

meaning from context, a sometimes bewildering but ultimately rewarding

experience for many students who have developed a slavish reliance on their

dictionaries. They need to learn that trying to find out the exact meaning

of a word is not always necessary, and can even be counter-productive if

the word has subtly acquired a different shade of meaning in a new context.

Although students are instructed to re-read the selection after doing

the Guessing Meaning from Context exercises, after having completed

several units, you might have them mark up the passage as main ideas,

subordinate ideas, and supporting details after reading it just once. This is

an approach commonly followed in courses in tertiary education, where the

sheer volume of reading to be covered often limits the student to no more

than a single reading of a chapter. Should you decide on more than one

reading, try to restrict dictionary usage to a minimum, stressing it as a last

resort.

In the Getting the Main Idea section, students practise finding the

topic sentence of a paragraph or, for paragraphs with no topic sentence,

practise “adding up” details to work out the implied main idea.

In sections on rhetorical functions, i.e. general and specific

information, cause and effect, classification, comparison and contrast,

etc., students are given adequate practice to understand these functions, and

also they are recycled where appropriate.

The Building Vocabulary exercises can be assigned as homework.

Students should be given free rein in practising newly-acquired

vocabulary when they express their opinions in the Discussing the Reading

sections. This may be handled in a number of ways. For example:

  1. the teacher asks questions of the entire class. The advantage

of this approach is teacher control of the discussion, to direct

and add to it. (However, a common problem can arise here with

an unresponsive group of students who may be too embarrassed

to speak out.

  1. the students discuss answers in small groups. A representative

of each group then reports the group’s findings to the entire class.

For very shy students, pairs of student reporters may be

preferable.

  1. one selected question is chosen for a debate. The class is then

divided into two sides, the sides choose two teams, and then

all prepare points for their team.

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Add to Wishlist

English for Health Sciences, Reading Skills, Lower Intermediate Level. Second Edition

$40.00

English For Health Sciences -Reading Skills, Lower Intermediate Level! This new edition is the product of constant revision and evaluation, not only by me, but also by the many instructors who, along with their students, have used the previous edition and have sent in valuable suggestions and comments. The success of the previous edition has been due, in large measure, to the honest and careful appraisal given by instructors and their students.

English For Health Sciences - Reading Skills, Lower Intermediate

Level, is the second in a series of English language texts constructed for use in health colleges, institutes and adult English language-training programmes. The aim of the series is to prepare students to participate in medical science courses.

This text is structured at the lower intermediate level of students of English as a Foreign Language (EFL). As with the first (elementary) text, it focuses on reading skills with the aims of facilitating the leap from basic English to academic English and preparing students to handle health science materials with confidence.

The topics have been selected from a wide range of authentic writings

including health-science curricula, medical journals, and textbooks to serve

as vehicles for developing reading with its associated skills in an interesting

and informative way. The rationale for selecting authentic materials is to ease

the students’ passage from the ‘safety’ of EFL English to confronting the

English of the ‘real world’ in a manner that makes students aware of the

control they can exercise, even with texts which are, at first sight, beyond

their level of language competence. Thus, despite the sometimes daunting

appearance of the readings, the tasks based on them are designed to be

within the students’ abilities to carry out. This encourages students to move

through the book with a growing sense of confidence and accomplishment

as they discover that they can find the main ideas and important details,

understand much of the new vocabulary without a dictionary, and successfully

apply critical thinking to their reading.

 

Unit Organization

Because the book’s primary purpose is to develop the reading

process, it offers a wide variety of exercises and activities directed at reading.

Each of the ten units consists of two parts, and each part is composed of

a brief pre-reading exercise and an exercise on skimming or scanning.

Following the reading itself, there are post-reading exercises that focus on

important reading skills that include:

   Getting the main idea of a passage

    Guessing meaning from context

􀁺 Understanding reading structure

􀁺 Understanding details

􀁺 Finding topic sentences

􀁺 Understanding cause and effect

􀁺 Recognizing contextual reference

􀁺 Understanding expressions and idioms

􀁺 Understanding adjectival and noun phrases

􀁺 Making an outline

􀁺 Understanding stems and affixes

􀁺 Using a dictionary

􀁺 Discussing questions that relate the reading selection to the students’ own

lives, allowing for some conversation

􀁺 Understanding comparison and contrast

􀁺 Understanding general and specific information

􀁺 Understanding classification

To the Teacher

Having some idea of the subject matter is clearly an important aspect

of successful reading. To this end, students need to be encouraged to look

at and discuss the pictures in the Before You Read and Getting Started

sections, and to attempt to answer the accompanying questions.

When tackling the reading selections themselves, students should read

silently. This increases reading speed and also closely parallels the established

approach to the reading of academic texts. Encouraging the students to

‘unhinge’ their minds from their lips, i.e. not to pronounce or silently mouth

words as they read, is an additional means of increasing one’s reading speed.

Not allowing dictionary use for the initial reading forces readers to try to

extract the meanings of words from their context in the passage. Stress the

importance of homing in on the main ideas of a reading passage.

As an alternate to this approach, you may occasionally wish to read

a passage aloud (or play a recording of it) while the students follow silently

in their books. Whichever approach is used, the passage should be read

through in full, without explanation.

The readings are followed by a variety of exercises in the After

Reading sections. These are intended to help students to consolidate, in

English, the very same skills they are assumed to possess in their native

language. Again, the emphasis is on grasping the main idea and guessing

meaning from context, a sometimes bewildering but ultimately rewarding

experience for many students who have developed a slavish reliance on their

dictionaries. They need to learn that trying to find out the exact meaning

of a word is not always necessary, and can even be counter-productive if

the word has subtly acquired a different shade of meaning in a new context.

Although students are instructed to re-read the selection after doing

the Guessing Meaning from Context exercises, after having completed

several units, you might have them mark up the passage as main ideas,

subordinate ideas, and supporting details after reading it just once. This is

an approach commonly followed in courses in tertiary education, where the

sheer volume of reading to be covered often limits the student to no more

than a single reading of a chapter. Should you decide on more than one

reading, try to restrict dictionary usage to a minimum, stressing it as a last

resort.

In the Getting the Main Idea section, students practise finding the

topic sentence of a paragraph or, for paragraphs with no topic sentence,

practise “adding up” details to work out the implied main idea.

In sections on rhetorical functions, i.e. general and specific

information, cause and effect, classification, comparison and contrast,

etc., students are given adequate practice to understand these functions, and

also they are recycled where appropriate.

The Building Vocabulary exercises can be assigned as homework.

Students should be given free rein in practising newly-acquired

vocabulary when they express their opinions in the Discussing the Reading

sections. This may be handled in a number of ways. For example:

  1. the teacher asks questions of the entire class. The advantage

of this approach is teacher control of the discussion, to direct

and add to it. (However, a common problem can arise here with

an unresponsive group of students who may be too embarrassed

to speak out.

  1. the students discuss answers in small groups. A representative

of each group then reports the group’s findings to the entire class.

For very shy students, pairs of student reporters may be

preferable.

  1. one selected question is chosen for a debate. The class is then

divided into two sides, the sides choose two teams, and then

all prepare points for their team.

Add to cartView cart
Quick View
Add to Wishlist
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Add to cartView cart

English for Health Sciences, Reading Skills. Intermediate Level. Third Edition

Published on 2020
$40.00

English for Health Sciences: Reading Skills, Intermediate Level! This new edition has undergone major improvements and is the product of constant revision and evaluation, not only by myself and my students, but by the many instructors who, along with their students, have used the previous edition and have contributed valuable suggestions and comments. The success of the previous edition has been due, in large measure, to the honest and careful appraisal given by language instructors and their students.

English for Health Sciences: Reading Skills, Intermediate Level is an English language text constructed for use in health colleges and institutes and adult English Language training programmes. The aim of the series is to prepare students to participate in health science courses. This text is structured at the intermediate level of students of English as a Foreign Language (EFL). It focuses on reading skills with the aim of facilitating the leap from basic English to academic English and preparing students to handle health science materials with confidence.

Unit Organization

English for Health Sciences: Reading Skills, Intermediate Level is made up of twelve units and four progress tests. To do the tests, the student has to login on to www.professorsuleimanmazyad.com using his/her username and password

which he/she can create using the code that appears on the back cover of the

book. Because the book’s primary purpose is to develop one’s reading ability, it offers a large variety of exercises and activities directed at reading. Each unit consists of a brief pre-reading exercise, vocabulary preview, and an exercise on skimming or scanning. Following the reading passage itself, there are post-reading exercises that focus on important reading skills: comprehension skills, getting the main idea, understanding the reading structure, understanding meaning from context, recognizing contextual reference, finding the topic and topic sentence, understanding general and specific ideas, summarizing, understanding signal words, making an outline, understanding cause and effect, comparison and contrast, classification, inference, exemplification, understanding stems and affixes, using a dictionary, increasing one’s reading speed, etc.

Each unit concludes with a discussion question designed to encourage students to think about, distill, and discuss the information they have read about throughout the unit. Sometimes the discussion deals with a topic from outside the reading.

The topics have been selected from a wide range of authentic writings including health science curriculum items as well as medical journals and textbooks to serve as vehicles for developing reading with its associated skills in an interesting and informative way.

An important goal of English for Health Sciences is to help health-science

students to become confident readers by increasing their vocabulary base

and improving their reading skills. It engages them in the process of reading

thoughtfully and encourages them to move beyond passive reading.

To the Teacher

Having some idea of the subject matter is clearly an important aspect of active

reading. To this end, students need to be encouraged to look at and discuss

the pictures in the Before Reading and Discussion Questions sections, and

to attempt to answer the accompanying questions. Answering in complete

sentences is best.

When tackling the reading selections themselves, students should read silently.

This speeds up their reading and also closely parallels the established approach

to the reading of academic texts. Encouraging the students to “unhinge” their

minds from their lips – i.e., not to pronounce words as they read – is an additional

means of increasing their reading speed. Not allowing them a dictionary for

the initial reading will force them to extract the meanings of words from their

context in the passage itself. Stress the importance of homing in on the central

idea of the text.

As an alternative to this approach, you may occasionally wish to read out a

passage (or play a recording of it) while the students follow it in their books.

Whichever approach is used, the passage should be read through in full and

without explanations.

The readings are followed by a variety of exercises in the After Reading section.

These are intended to help students to consolidate, in English, the very same

skills they are assumed to possess in their own language. Again, the emphasis

is on grasping the main idea and guessing meaning from context – a sometimes

bewildering but ultimately rewarding experience for those students who have

developed a slavish reliance on their dictionaries. They need to learn that trying

to find out the exact meaning of a word is not always necessary and can even be

counter-productive if the word has subtly acquired a different shade of meaning

in a new context.

Although students are instructed to re-read the selection after doing the Guessing

Meaning from Context exercises, towards the end of the book you might wish

to consider having them mark the passage after reading it just once – an approach

commonly followed in courses in tertiary education, where the sheer volume of

reading to be done often limits a student to no more than a single reading of a

chapter. Should you decide on more than one reading, restrict dictionary usage

to an absolute minimum, often as a last resort.

In the Getting the Main Idea sections, students practise finding the topic

sentence of a paragraph.

The Building Vocabulary exercises can be assigned as homework, but the

Study Skills activities should be completed in class, particularly those dealing

with increasing reading speed.

Students are given free rein in practising newly-acquired vocabulary when

they express their opinion in the Discussing the Reading section. This may be

handled in a number of ways. For example:

  1. The teacher asks questions of the entire class. The advantage of this

approach is teacher-control of the discussion – to direct and add to it. A

common problem arises with an unresponsive group of students who

may be too self-conscious to speak out.

  1. The students discuss answers in small groups. A representative of each

group then reports the group’s findings to the entire class. For very

shy students, pairs of students may be preferable.

  1. One selected question is chosen for a debate. The class is then divided

into two teams who prepare points for their team.

Quick View
Add to Wishlist

English for Health Sciences, Reading Skills. Intermediate Level. Third Edition

$40.00

English for Health Sciences: Reading Skills, Intermediate Level! This new edition has undergone major improvements and is the product of constant revision and evaluation, not only by myself and my students, but by the many instructors who, along with their students, have used the previous edition and have contributed valuable suggestions and comments. The success of the previous edition has been due, in large measure, to the honest and careful appraisal given by language instructors and their students.

English for Health Sciences: Reading Skills, Intermediate Level is an English language text constructed for use in health colleges and institutes and adult English Language training programmes. The aim of the series is to prepare students to participate in health science courses. This text is structured at the intermediate level of students of English as a Foreign Language (EFL). It focuses on reading skills with the aim of facilitating the leap from basic English to academic English and preparing students to handle health science materials with confidence.

Unit Organization

English for Health Sciences: Reading Skills, Intermediate Level is made up of twelve units and four progress tests. To do the tests, the student has to login on to www.professorsuleimanmazyad.com using his/her username and password

which he/she can create using the code that appears on the back cover of the

book. Because the book’s primary purpose is to develop one’s reading ability, it offers a large variety of exercises and activities directed at reading. Each unit consists of a brief pre-reading exercise, vocabulary preview, and an exercise on skimming or scanning. Following the reading passage itself, there are post-reading exercises that focus on important reading skills: comprehension skills, getting the main idea, understanding the reading structure, understanding meaning from context, recognizing contextual reference, finding the topic and topic sentence, understanding general and specific ideas, summarizing, understanding signal words, making an outline, understanding cause and effect, comparison and contrast, classification, inference, exemplification, understanding stems and affixes, using a dictionary, increasing one’s reading speed, etc.

Each unit concludes with a discussion question designed to encourage students to think about, distill, and discuss the information they have read about throughout the unit. Sometimes the discussion deals with a topic from outside the reading.

The topics have been selected from a wide range of authentic writings including health science curriculum items as well as medical journals and textbooks to serve as vehicles for developing reading with its associated skills in an interesting and informative way.

An important goal of English for Health Sciences is to help health-science

students to become confident readers by increasing their vocabulary base

and improving their reading skills. It engages them in the process of reading

thoughtfully and encourages them to move beyond passive reading.

To the Teacher

Having some idea of the subject matter is clearly an important aspect of active

reading. To this end, students need to be encouraged to look at and discuss

the pictures in the Before Reading and Discussion Questions sections, and

to attempt to answer the accompanying questions. Answering in complete

sentences is best.

When tackling the reading selections themselves, students should read silently.

This speeds up their reading and also closely parallels the established approach

to the reading of academic texts. Encouraging the students to “unhinge” their

minds from their lips – i.e., not to pronounce words as they read – is an additional

means of increasing their reading speed. Not allowing them a dictionary for

the initial reading will force them to extract the meanings of words from their

context in the passage itself. Stress the importance of homing in on the central

idea of the text.

As an alternative to this approach, you may occasionally wish to read out a

passage (or play a recording of it) while the students follow it in their books.

Whichever approach is used, the passage should be read through in full and

without explanations.

The readings are followed by a variety of exercises in the After Reading section.

These are intended to help students to consolidate, in English, the very same

skills they are assumed to possess in their own language. Again, the emphasis

is on grasping the main idea and guessing meaning from context – a sometimes

bewildering but ultimately rewarding experience for those students who have

developed a slavish reliance on their dictionaries. They need to learn that trying

to find out the exact meaning of a word is not always necessary and can even be

counter-productive if the word has subtly acquired a different shade of meaning

in a new context.

Although students are instructed to re-read the selection after doing the Guessing

Meaning from Context exercises, towards the end of the book you might wish

to consider having them mark the passage after reading it just once – an approach

commonly followed in courses in tertiary education, where the sheer volume of

reading to be done often limits a student to no more than a single reading of a

chapter. Should you decide on more than one reading, restrict dictionary usage

to an absolute minimum, often as a last resort.

In the Getting the Main Idea sections, students practise finding the topic

sentence of a paragraph.

The Building Vocabulary exercises can be assigned as homework, but the

Study Skills activities should be completed in class, particularly those dealing

with increasing reading speed.

Students are given free rein in practising newly-acquired vocabulary when

they express their opinion in the Discussing the Reading section. This may be

handled in a number of ways. For example:

  1. The teacher asks questions of the entire class. The advantage of this

approach is teacher-control of the discussion – to direct and add to it. A

common problem arises with an unresponsive group of students who

may be too self-conscious to speak out.

  1. The students discuss answers in small groups. A representative of each

group then reports the group’s findings to the entire class. For very

shy students, pairs of students may be preferable.

  1. One selected question is chosen for a debate. The class is then divided

into two teams who prepare points for their team.

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English for journalism, Elementary Level

Published on 2015
$40.00
English for Journalism is made up of twelve thematically-based units, each of which contains one reading. Skill –building and vocabulary –building activities accompany each reading. An important goal of  English for Journalism is to help students become confident readers by increasing their vocabulary base and improving their word comprehension skills. It engages them in the process of reading thoughtfully and encourages them to move beyond merely passive reading. To accomplish this, the book  addresses the reading process in a direct manner, and various reading and vocabulary skills are presented as a part of that process. The instruction and practice in reading skills helps students increase their reading fluency, and equip them with skills they need for academic achievement. Focus on vocabulary – building promotes their language acquisition and academic advancement. Also, the lexical and syntactic content of the readings has been controlled. The tasks are varied, accessible and engaging, and they provide stimuli for frequent student – teacher and student-student interaction. Student awareness of reading and thinking process is further encouraged in many parts of the book by exercises that require students to work in pairs or small groups. In discussion with others, students formulate and articulate their ideas more precisely , and so they acquire new ways of talking and thinking about a text. These activities present opportunities for real-world contact and real –world use of language. Students are asked to write, and then to read each other’s work so they can experience the connection between reading and writing. Traditionally reading classes are base on one of two approaches: in one approach, class time is primarily spent with students doing individual reading and exercise –completion. Because both approaches are important , this book integrates them by alternating reading activities with speaking and /or writing activities. Within each unit, students will not only practice reading, but they will also receive instruction in various skills and strategies incorporated into the reading process. The basic format of each unit in English for Journalism is as follows: Before Reading These pre-reading questions serve to introduce the topic of reading and get students thinking about that topic. Activating prior knowledge allows students to tap into what they already know and then build on that knowledge, and stirs curiosity. The questions allow students to interact with each other.   Vocabulary Preview A number of key words and phrases which are common in legal English are explained in simple English. These are followed by a fill-in-the -blanks exercise to make sure that students understand the words and can use them in context. Understanding is crucial to language acquisition. Scanning and Skimming In this section students are asked to scan the reading for specific information, or to skim it for main ideas and other general information. After Reading In this section a variety of skill-building and vocabulary-building exercises is introduced: determining the main idea; understanding reading structure; guessing meaning from context; recognizing contextual reference; finding topics and topic sentences; understanding signal terms making and outline; understanding cause and effect; comparison and contrast; exemplification; classification; understanding antonyms and synonyms, etc. These dynamic skill and vocabulary acquisition exercises ensure that students will develop and acquire the important reading skills and vocabulary needed to make them good readers. Each unit concludes with discussion questions designed to encourage students to think about, distill, and exchange views about the information they have been presented with through out the unit. Following discussion, the students are sometimes requested to write down answers to the discussion questions, a place for students to reflect in writing  on the learning in the unit.
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English for journalism, Elementary Level

$40.00
English for Journalism is made up of twelve thematically-based units, each of which contains one reading. Skill –building and vocabulary –building activities accompany each reading. An important goal of  English for Journalism is to help students become confident readers by increasing their vocabulary base and improving their word comprehension skills. It engages them in the process of reading thoughtfully and encourages them to move beyond merely passive reading. To accomplish this, the book  addresses the reading process in a direct manner, and various reading and vocabulary skills are presented as a part of that process. The instruction and practice in reading skills helps students increase their reading fluency, and equip them with skills they need for academic achievement. Focus on vocabulary – building promotes their language acquisition and academic advancement. Also, the lexical and syntactic content of the readings has been controlled. The tasks are varied, accessible and engaging, and they provide stimuli for frequent student – teacher and student-student interaction. Student awareness of reading and thinking process is further encouraged in many parts of the book by exercises that require students to work in pairs or small groups. In discussion with others, students formulate and articulate their ideas more precisely , and so they acquire new ways of talking and thinking about a text. These activities present opportunities for real-world contact and real –world use of language. Students are asked to write, and then to read each other’s work so they can experience the connection between reading and writing. Traditionally reading classes are base on one of two approaches: in one approach, class time is primarily spent with students doing individual reading and exercise –completion. Because both approaches are important , this book integrates them by alternating reading activities with speaking and /or writing activities. Within each unit, students will not only practice reading, but they will also receive instruction in various skills and strategies incorporated into the reading process. The basic format of each unit in English for Journalism is as follows: Before Reading These pre-reading questions serve to introduce the topic of reading and get students thinking about that topic. Activating prior knowledge allows students to tap into what they already know and then build on that knowledge, and stirs curiosity. The questions allow students to interact with each other.   Vocabulary Preview A number of key words and phrases which are common in legal English are explained in simple English. These are followed by a fill-in-the -blanks exercise to make sure that students understand the words and can use them in context. Understanding is crucial to language acquisition. Scanning and Skimming In this section students are asked to scan the reading for specific information, or to skim it for main ideas and other general information. After Reading In this section a variety of skill-building and vocabulary-building exercises is introduced: determining the main idea; understanding reading structure; guessing meaning from context; recognizing contextual reference; finding topics and topic sentences; understanding signal terms making and outline; understanding cause and effect; comparison and contrast; exemplification; classification; understanding antonyms and synonyms, etc. These dynamic skill and vocabulary acquisition exercises ensure that students will develop and acquire the important reading skills and vocabulary needed to make them good readers. Each unit concludes with discussion questions designed to encourage students to think about, distill, and exchange views about the information they have been presented with through out the unit. Following discussion, the students are sometimes requested to write down answers to the discussion questions, a place for students to reflect in writing  on the learning in the unit.
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English for Journalism, Intermediate Level

$40.00
English for Journalism is made up of twelve thematically-based units, each of which contains one reading. Skill –building and vocabulary –building activities accompany each reading. An important goal of  English for Journalism is to help students become confident readers by increasing their vocabulary base and improving their word comprehension skills. It engages them in the process of reading thoughtfully and encourages them to move beyond merely passive reading. To accomplish this, the book  addresses the reading process in a direct manner, and various reading and vocabulary skills are presented as a part of that process. The instruction and practice in reading skills helps students increase their reading fluency, and equip them with skills they need for academic achievement. Focus on vocabulary – building promotes their language acquisition and academic advancement. Also, the lexical and syntactic content of the readings has been controlled. The tasks are varied, accessible and engaging, and they provide stimuli for frequent student – teacher and student-student interaction. Student awareness of reading and thinking process is further encouraged in many parts of the book by exercises that require students to work in pairs or small groups. In discussion with others, students formulate and articulate their ideas more precisely , and so they acquire new ways of talking and thinking about a text. These activities present opportunities for real-world contact and real –world use of language. Students are asked to write, and then to read each other’s work so they can experience the connection between reading and writing. Traditionally reading classes are base on one of two approaches: in one approach, class time is primarily spent with students doing individual reading and exercise –completion. Because both approaches are important , this book integrates them by alternating reading activities with speaking and /or writing activities. Within each unit, students will not only practice reading, but they will also receive instruction in various skills and strategies incorporated into the reading process. The basic format of each unit in English for Journalism is as follows: Before Reading These pre-reading questions serve to introduce the topic of reading and get students thinking about that topic. Activating prior knowledge allows students to tap into what they already know and then build on that knowledge, and stirs curiosity. The questions allow students to interact with each other.   Vocabulary Preview A number of key words and phrases which are common in legal English are explained in simple English. These are followed by a fill-in-the -blanks exercise to make sure that students understand the words and can use them in context. Understanding is crucial to language acquisition. Scanning and Skimming In this section students are asked to scan the reading for specific information, or to skim it for main ideas and other general information. After Reading In this section a variety of skill-building and vocabulary-building exercises is introduced: determining the main idea; understanding reading structure; guessing meaning from context; recognizing contextual reference; finding topics and topic sentences; understanding signal terms making and outline; understanding cause and effect; comparison and contrast; exemplification; classification; understanding antonyms and synonyms, etc. These dynamic skill and vocabulary acquisition exercises ensure that students will develop and acquire the important reading skills and vocabulary needed to make them good readers. Each unit concludes with discussion questions designed to encourage students to think about, distill, and exchange views about the information they have been presented with through out the unit. Following discussion, the students are sometimes requested to write down answers to the discussion questions, a place for students to reflect in writing  on the learning in the unit.  
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English for Journalism, Intermediate Level

$40.00
English for Journalism is made up of twelve thematically-based units, each of which contains one reading. Skill –building and vocabulary –building activities accompany each reading. An important goal of  English for Journalism is to help students become confident readers by increasing their vocabulary base and improving their word comprehension skills. It engages them in the process of reading thoughtfully and encourages them to move beyond merely passive reading. To accomplish this, the book  addresses the reading process in a direct manner, and various reading and vocabulary skills are presented as a part of that process. The instruction and practice in reading skills helps students increase their reading fluency, and equip them with skills they need for academic achievement. Focus on vocabulary – building promotes their language acquisition and academic advancement. Also, the lexical and syntactic content of the readings has been controlled. The tasks are varied, accessible and engaging, and they provide stimuli for frequent student – teacher and student-student interaction. Student awareness of reading and thinking process is further encouraged in many parts of the book by exercises that require students to work in pairs or small groups. In discussion with others, students formulate and articulate their ideas more precisely , and so they acquire new ways of talking and thinking about a text. These activities present opportunities for real-world contact and real –world use of language. Students are asked to write, and then to read each other’s work so they can experience the connection between reading and writing. Traditionally reading classes are base on one of two approaches: in one approach, class time is primarily spent with students doing individual reading and exercise –completion. Because both approaches are important , this book integrates them by alternating reading activities with speaking and /or writing activities. Within each unit, students will not only practice reading, but they will also receive instruction in various skills and strategies incorporated into the reading process. The basic format of each unit in English for Journalism is as follows: Before Reading These pre-reading questions serve to introduce the topic of reading and get students thinking about that topic. Activating prior knowledge allows students to tap into what they already know and then build on that knowledge, and stirs curiosity. The questions allow students to interact with each other.   Vocabulary Preview A number of key words and phrases which are common in legal English are explained in simple English. These are followed by a fill-in-the -blanks exercise to make sure that students understand the words and can use them in context. Understanding is crucial to language acquisition. Scanning and Skimming In this section students are asked to scan the reading for specific information, or to skim it for main ideas and other general information. After Reading In this section a variety of skill-building and vocabulary-building exercises is introduced: determining the main idea; understanding reading structure; guessing meaning from context; recognizing contextual reference; finding topics and topic sentences; understanding signal terms making and outline; understanding cause and effect; comparison and contrast; exemplification; classification; understanding antonyms and synonyms, etc. These dynamic skill and vocabulary acquisition exercises ensure that students will develop and acquire the important reading skills and vocabulary needed to make them good readers. Each unit concludes with discussion questions designed to encourage students to think about, distill, and exchange views about the information they have been presented with through out the unit. Following discussion, the students are sometimes requested to write down answers to the discussion questions, a place for students to reflect in writing  on the learning in the unit.  
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English for Legal Studies ,Elementary Level

Published on 2013
$40.00
English for Legal Studies is made up of eight thematically-based units, each of which contains two readings. Skill-building and vocabulary-building activities accompany each reading. An important goal of English for Legal Studies is to help students become confident readers by increasing their vocabulary base and improving their word-comprehension skills. It engages them in the process of reading thoughtfully and encourages them to move beyond merely passive reading. To accomplish this, the book addresses the reading process in a direct manner, and various reading and vocabulary skills are presented as part of that process. The instruction and practice with reading skills help students increase their reading fluency, and equip them with skills they need for academic achievement. Focus on vocabulary-building promotes their language acquisition and academic advancement. Also, the lexical and syntactic content of the readings has been controlled. The tasks are varied, accessible, and engaging, and they provide stimuli for frequent student-teacher and student-student interaction. Student awareness of reading and thinking processes is further encouraged in many parts of the book by exercises which require students to work in pairs or small groups. In discussions with others, students formulate and articulate their ideas more precisely, and so they acquire new ways of talking and thinking about a text. These activities present opportunities for real-world contact and real-world use of language. Students are asked to write, and then to read each other’s work so they can experience the connection between reading and writing. Traditionally reading classes are based on one of two approaches: in one approach, class time is primarily spent with students doing individual reading and exercise-completion; in the other, class time is devoted to group discussions of the reading and exercise-completion. Because both approaches are important, this book integrates them by alternating reading activities with speaking and/or writing activities. Within each unit, students will not only practice reading, but they will also receive instruction in various skills and strategies incorporated into the reading process. The basic format of each unit in English for Legal Studies is as follows: Before Reading These pre-reading questions serve to introduce the topic of the reading and get students thinking about that topic. Activating prior knowledge allows students to tap into what they already know and then build on that knowledge, and stirs curiosity. The questions allow students to interact with each other. Vocabulary Preview A number of key words and phrases which are common in legal English are explained in simple English. These are followed by a fill-in-the-blanks exercise to make sure that students understand the words and can use them in context. Understanding is crucial to language acquisition. Scanning and Skimming In this section students are asked to scan the reading for specific information, or to skim it for main ideas and other general information.   After Reading In this section a variety of skill-building and vocabulary-building exercises is introduced: determining the main idea; understanding reading structure; guessing meaning from context; recognizing contextual reference; finding topics and topic sentences; understanding signal terms; making an outline; understanding cause and effect; comparison and contrast; exemplification; classification; understanding antonyms and synonyms, etc. These dynamic skill and vocabulary acquisition exercises ensure that students will develop and acquire the important reading skills and vocabulary needed to make them good readers. Each unit concludes with discussion questions designed to encourage students to think about, distill, and exchange views about the information they have been presented with throughout the unit. Following the discussion, the students are sometimes requested to write down answers to the discussion questions, a place for students to reflect in writing on the learning in the unit.
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English for Legal Studies ,Elementary Level

$40.00
English for Legal Studies is made up of eight thematically-based units, each of which contains two readings. Skill-building and vocabulary-building activities accompany each reading. An important goal of English for Legal Studies is to help students become confident readers by increasing their vocabulary base and improving their word-comprehension skills. It engages them in the process of reading thoughtfully and encourages them to move beyond merely passive reading. To accomplish this, the book addresses the reading process in a direct manner, and various reading and vocabulary skills are presented as part of that process. The instruction and practice with reading skills help students increase their reading fluency, and equip them with skills they need for academic achievement. Focus on vocabulary-building promotes their language acquisition and academic advancement. Also, the lexical and syntactic content of the readings has been controlled. The tasks are varied, accessible, and engaging, and they provide stimuli for frequent student-teacher and student-student interaction. Student awareness of reading and thinking processes is further encouraged in many parts of the book by exercises which require students to work in pairs or small groups. In discussions with others, students formulate and articulate their ideas more precisely, and so they acquire new ways of talking and thinking about a text. These activities present opportunities for real-world contact and real-world use of language. Students are asked to write, and then to read each other’s work so they can experience the connection between reading and writing. Traditionally reading classes are based on one of two approaches: in one approach, class time is primarily spent with students doing individual reading and exercise-completion; in the other, class time is devoted to group discussions of the reading and exercise-completion. Because both approaches are important, this book integrates them by alternating reading activities with speaking and/or writing activities. Within each unit, students will not only practice reading, but they will also receive instruction in various skills and strategies incorporated into the reading process. The basic format of each unit in English for Legal Studies is as follows: Before Reading These pre-reading questions serve to introduce the topic of the reading and get students thinking about that topic. Activating prior knowledge allows students to tap into what they already know and then build on that knowledge, and stirs curiosity. The questions allow students to interact with each other. Vocabulary Preview A number of key words and phrases which are common in legal English are explained in simple English. These are followed by a fill-in-the-blanks exercise to make sure that students understand the words and can use them in context. Understanding is crucial to language acquisition. Scanning and Skimming In this section students are asked to scan the reading for specific information, or to skim it for main ideas and other general information.   After Reading In this section a variety of skill-building and vocabulary-building exercises is introduced: determining the main idea; understanding reading structure; guessing meaning from context; recognizing contextual reference; finding topics and topic sentences; understanding signal terms; making an outline; understanding cause and effect; comparison and contrast; exemplification; classification; understanding antonyms and synonyms, etc. These dynamic skill and vocabulary acquisition exercises ensure that students will develop and acquire the important reading skills and vocabulary needed to make them good readers. Each unit concludes with discussion questions designed to encourage students to think about, distill, and exchange views about the information they have been presented with throughout the unit. Following the discussion, the students are sometimes requested to write down answers to the discussion questions, a place for students to reflect in writing on the learning in the unit.
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English for Legal Studies, Intermediate Level

Published on 2014
$50.00
English for Legal Studies is made up of ten thematically-based units, each of which contains one/two readings.  Skill-building and vocabulary-building activities accompany each reading.   An important goal of English for Legal Studies is to help students become confident readers by increasing their vocabulary base and improving their word-comprehension skills. It engages them in the process of reading thoughtfully and encourages them to move beyond merely passive reading. To accomplish this, the book addresses the reading process in a direct manner, and various reading and vocabulary skills are presented as part of that process. The instruction and practice with reading skills help students increase their reading fluency, and equip them with skills they need for academic achievement. Focus on vocabulary-building promotes their language acquisition and academic advancement. Also, the lexical and syntactic content of the readings has been controlled. The tasks are varied, accessible, and engaging, and they provide stimuli for frequent student-teacher and student-student interaction.   Student awareness of reading and thinking processes is further encouraged in many parts of the book by exercises which require students to work in pairs or small groups. In discussions with others, students formulate and articulate their ideas more precisely, and so they acquire new ways of talking and thinking about a text. These activities present opportunities for real-world contact and real-world use of language. Students are asked to write, and then to read each other’s work so they can experience the connection between reading and writing.   Traditionally reading classes are based on one of two approaches: in one approach, class time is primarily spent with students doing individual reading and exercise-completion; in the other, class time is devoted to group discussions of the reading and exercise-completion. Because both approaches are important, this book integrates them by alternating reading activities with speaking and/or writing activities. Within each unit, students will not only practice reading, but they will also receive instruction in various skills and strategies incorporated into the reading process.   The basic format of each unit in English for Legal Studies is as follows:        Before Reading These pre-reading questions serve to introduce the topic of the reading and get students thinking about that topic. Activating prior knowledge allows students to tap into what they already know and then build on that knowledge, and stirs curiosity. The questions allow students to interact with each other.        Vocabulary Preview A number of key words and phrases which are common in legal English are explained in simple English. These are followed by a fill-in-the-blanks exercise to make sure that students understand the words and can use them in context. Understanding is crucial to language acquisition.        Scanning and Skimming In this section students are asked to scan the reading for specific information, or to skim it for main ideas and other general information.        After Reading In this section a variety of skill-building and vocabulary-building exercises is introduced: determining the main idea; understanding reading structure; guessing meaning from context; recognizing contextual reference; finding topics and topic sentences; understanding signal terms; making an outline; understanding cause and effect; comparison and contrast; exemplification; classification;  understanding antonyms and synonyms, etc. These dynamic skill and vocabulary acquisition exercises ensure that students will develop and acquire the important reading skills and vocabulary needed to make them good readers.   Each unit concludes with discussion questions designed to encourage students to think about, distill, and exchange views about the information they have been presented with throughout the unit. Following the discussion, the students are sometimes requested to write down answers to the discussion questions, a place for students to reflect in writing on the learning in the unit.
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English for Legal Studies, Intermediate Level

$50.00
English for Legal Studies is made up of ten thematically-based units, each of which contains one/two readings.  Skill-building and vocabulary-building activities accompany each reading.   An important goal of English for Legal Studies is to help students become confident readers by increasing their vocabulary base and improving their word-comprehension skills. It engages them in the process of reading thoughtfully and encourages them to move beyond merely passive reading. To accomplish this, the book addresses the reading process in a direct manner, and various reading and vocabulary skills are presented as part of that process. The instruction and practice with reading skills help students increase their reading fluency, and equip them with skills they need for academic achievement. Focus on vocabulary-building promotes their language acquisition and academic advancement. Also, the lexical and syntactic content of the readings has been controlled. The tasks are varied, accessible, and engaging, and they provide stimuli for frequent student-teacher and student-student interaction.   Student awareness of reading and thinking processes is further encouraged in many parts of the book by exercises which require students to work in pairs or small groups. In discussions with others, students formulate and articulate their ideas more precisely, and so they acquire new ways of talking and thinking about a text. These activities present opportunities for real-world contact and real-world use of language. Students are asked to write, and then to read each other’s work so they can experience the connection between reading and writing.   Traditionally reading classes are based on one of two approaches: in one approach, class time is primarily spent with students doing individual reading and exercise-completion; in the other, class time is devoted to group discussions of the reading and exercise-completion. Because both approaches are important, this book integrates them by alternating reading activities with speaking and/or writing activities. Within each unit, students will not only practice reading, but they will also receive instruction in various skills and strategies incorporated into the reading process.   The basic format of each unit in English for Legal Studies is as follows:        Before Reading These pre-reading questions serve to introduce the topic of the reading and get students thinking about that topic. Activating prior knowledge allows students to tap into what they already know and then build on that knowledge, and stirs curiosity. The questions allow students to interact with each other.        Vocabulary Preview A number of key words and phrases which are common in legal English are explained in simple English. These are followed by a fill-in-the-blanks exercise to make sure that students understand the words and can use them in context. Understanding is crucial to language acquisition.        Scanning and Skimming In this section students are asked to scan the reading for specific information, or to skim it for main ideas and other general information.        After Reading In this section a variety of skill-building and vocabulary-building exercises is introduced: determining the main idea; understanding reading structure; guessing meaning from context; recognizing contextual reference; finding topics and topic sentences; understanding signal terms; making an outline; understanding cause and effect; comparison and contrast; exemplification; classification;  understanding antonyms and synonyms, etc. These dynamic skill and vocabulary acquisition exercises ensure that students will develop and acquire the important reading skills and vocabulary needed to make them good readers.   Each unit concludes with discussion questions designed to encourage students to think about, distill, and exchange views about the information they have been presented with throughout the unit. Following the discussion, the students are sometimes requested to write down answers to the discussion questions, a place for students to reflect in writing on the learning in the unit.
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English For Nursing, Elementary Level

Published on 2016
$40.00
Preface             ENGLISH FOR NURSING is an English language text designed for student nurses  at an elementary level of English as a Foreign Language (EFL). The text integrates the basic skills of reading speaking and writing in order to prepare nurse students to understand and communicate in nursing subjects at an elementary level. The project evolved from a study of the needs of student nurses in the Arab world. Although the book focuses on nursing, most of the skills taught are appropriate for any academic course of study.   Unit Organisation The book attempts to emphasize and integrate the basic skills of reading, speaking and writing. The primary focus is placed on reading skills and vocabulary development in the context of academic nursing use. Grammar, arising from the reading passages, is restricted so as to aid consolidation of the above skills. The introduction of grammatical items is graded and sequenced, where appropriate, in accordance with the principles of elementary language acquisition. The reading passages have been carefully selected to reflect an appropriate level of language and to cover a wide range of nursing topics from nursing curriculum and nursing journals. They are arranged in ten units; and each unit consists of a brief pre-reading exercise and an exercise on skimming or scanning. Following the reading passage itself, there are post-reading exercises that focus on important reading skills: getting the main idea, guessing meaning from context, understanding the reading structure, finding the topic sentence, recognizing contextual reference, understanding signal words, making notes, outlining, comparing and contrasting, cause and effect, classification, exemplification, making inferences, rephrasing understanding stems and affixes, and discussing questions that relate the reading passage to the student’s own life. A wide range of speaking and writing activities are closely related to the reading passages and give students adequate practice in the production of language in the field of nursing.             Suleiman Saleem Mazyad, Ph.D.                                             June, 2005                                              Riyadh.  
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English For Nursing, Elementary Level

$40.00
Preface             ENGLISH FOR NURSING is an English language text designed for student nurses  at an elementary level of English as a Foreign Language (EFL). The text integrates the basic skills of reading speaking and writing in order to prepare nurse students to understand and communicate in nursing subjects at an elementary level. The project evolved from a study of the needs of student nurses in the Arab world. Although the book focuses on nursing, most of the skills taught are appropriate for any academic course of study.   Unit Organisation The book attempts to emphasize and integrate the basic skills of reading, speaking and writing. The primary focus is placed on reading skills and vocabulary development in the context of academic nursing use. Grammar, arising from the reading passages, is restricted so as to aid consolidation of the above skills. The introduction of grammatical items is graded and sequenced, where appropriate, in accordance with the principles of elementary language acquisition. The reading passages have been carefully selected to reflect an appropriate level of language and to cover a wide range of nursing topics from nursing curriculum and nursing journals. They are arranged in ten units; and each unit consists of a brief pre-reading exercise and an exercise on skimming or scanning. Following the reading passage itself, there are post-reading exercises that focus on important reading skills: getting the main idea, guessing meaning from context, understanding the reading structure, finding the topic sentence, recognizing contextual reference, understanding signal words, making notes, outlining, comparing and contrasting, cause and effect, classification, exemplification, making inferences, rephrasing understanding stems and affixes, and discussing questions that relate the reading passage to the student’s own life. A wide range of speaking and writing activities are closely related to the reading passages and give students adequate practice in the production of language in the field of nursing.             Suleiman Saleem Mazyad, Ph.D.                                             June, 2005                                              Riyadh.  
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ENGLISH FOR NURSING, Intermediate Level

Published on 2016
$40.00
ENGLISH FOR NURSING is an English language text designed for nurse students at an intermediate level of English as a Foreign Language (EFL). The text integrates the basic skills of reading speaking and writing in order to prepare nurse students to comprehend and communicate in nursing subjects at the intermediate level. The project evolved from a study of the needs of nurse students in the Arab world. Although the book focuses on nursing, most of the skills taught are appropriate for any academic course of study.   Unit Organisation The book attempts to emphasize and integrate the basic skills of reading, speaking and writing. The primary focus is placed on reading skills and vocabulary development in the context of academic nursing use. Grammar, arising from the reading passages, is restricted so as to aid consolidation of the above skills. The introduction of grammatical items is graded and sequenced, where appropriate, in accordance with the principles of intermediate language acquisition. The reading passages have been carefully selected to reflect an appropriate level of language and to cover a wide range of nursing topics from nursing curriculum and nursing journals. They are arranged in ten units; and each unit consists of a brief pre-reading exercise and an exercise on skimming or scanning. Following the reading passage itself, there are post-reading exercises that focus on important reading skills: getting the main idea, guessing meaning from context, understanding the reading structure, finding the topic sentence, recognizing contextual reference, understanding signal words, making notes, outlining, comparison and contrast, cause and effect, classification, exemplification, making inference, rephrasing understanding stems and affixes, discussing questions that relate the reading passage to the student’s own life. A wide range of speaking and writing activities are closely related to the reading passages and give students adequate practice in the production of language in the field of nursing.                                                                                                   
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ENGLISH FOR NURSING, Intermediate Level

$40.00
ENGLISH FOR NURSING is an English language text designed for nurse students at an intermediate level of English as a Foreign Language (EFL). The text integrates the basic skills of reading speaking and writing in order to prepare nurse students to comprehend and communicate in nursing subjects at the intermediate level. The project evolved from a study of the needs of nurse students in the Arab world. Although the book focuses on nursing, most of the skills taught are appropriate for any academic course of study.   Unit Organisation The book attempts to emphasize and integrate the basic skills of reading, speaking and writing. The primary focus is placed on reading skills and vocabulary development in the context of academic nursing use. Grammar, arising from the reading passages, is restricted so as to aid consolidation of the above skills. The introduction of grammatical items is graded and sequenced, where appropriate, in accordance with the principles of intermediate language acquisition. The reading passages have been carefully selected to reflect an appropriate level of language and to cover a wide range of nursing topics from nursing curriculum and nursing journals. They are arranged in ten units; and each unit consists of a brief pre-reading exercise and an exercise on skimming or scanning. Following the reading passage itself, there are post-reading exercises that focus on important reading skills: getting the main idea, guessing meaning from context, understanding the reading structure, finding the topic sentence, recognizing contextual reference, understanding signal words, making notes, outlining, comparison and contrast, cause and effect, classification, exemplification, making inference, rephrasing understanding stems and affixes, discussing questions that relate the reading passage to the student’s own life. A wide range of speaking and writing activities are closely related to the reading passages and give students adequate practice in the production of language in the field of nursing.                                                                                                   
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English for Science, Elementary Level, Third Edition

Published on 2004
$40.00

Welcome to the third edition to English For Science, Elementary Level! This new edition is the product of constant revision and evalution, not only by myself, but by the many instructors who, along with their students, have used the previous edition and have contributed valuable suggestions and comments. The success of the previous edition has been due, in large measure, to the honest and careful appraisal given by instructors and their students. English For Science, Elementary Level, is the first book in a twolevel course especially designed for learners of English as a Foreign language who study basic science courses. It facilitates the leap from basic English to academic English, and prepares students to comprehend and use science material at an elementary level.

English For Science, Elementary, is an integrated text organized around specific rhetorical functions: general and specific information; classifying; defining; chronological order; cause and effect; comparing and contrasting; and describing a process.

Unit Organization

The book emphasizes and integrates the basic skills of speaking, reading, and writing in the context of academic usage. The introduction of grammatical items is graded and sequenced in accordance with the principles of elementary language acquisition. However, grammar explanations, arising from the content of reading passages, are limited so as to aid consolidation of the above basic skills.

The units are organized around the rhetorical functions used in scientific study. Each rhetorical function is introduced in a short reading passage and developed further in relevant exercises. As far as possible, reading and writing skills are introduced as they relate to the rhetorical function.

Topics have been carefully selected from the general science curriculum (biology, botany, chemistry, physics and mathematics) to serve as vehicles for presenting the rhetorical functions, syntactic constructions, and vocabulary used frequently in scientific discourse. They reflect an appropriate level of language. They are arranged in ten units which consist of vocabulary and gap-fill passages, skimming and scanning exercises, and further activities to develop effective reading strategies. Specific grammatical points from the reading passages lead on to writing and speaking exercises. EFL students may be familiar with the science concepts that are covered in here but not know how to express and discuss them in English.

The focus of the book, however, is always on language rather than science, and there is no attempt to cover any scientific topic thoroughly. No previous science knowledge is needed by the teacher or student to be able to use this volume effectively for studying and improving their English.

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English for Science, Elementary Level, Third Edition

$40.00

Welcome to the third edition to English For Science, Elementary Level! This new edition is the product of constant revision and evalution, not only by myself, but by the many instructors who, along with their students, have used the previous edition and have contributed valuable suggestions and comments. The success of the previous edition has been due, in large measure, to the honest and careful appraisal given by instructors and their students. English For Science, Elementary Level, is the first book in a twolevel course especially designed for learners of English as a Foreign language who study basic science courses. It facilitates the leap from basic English to academic English, and prepares students to comprehend and use science material at an elementary level.

English For Science, Elementary, is an integrated text organized around specific rhetorical functions: general and specific information; classifying; defining; chronological order; cause and effect; comparing and contrasting; and describing a process.

Unit Organization

The book emphasizes and integrates the basic skills of speaking, reading, and writing in the context of academic usage. The introduction of grammatical items is graded and sequenced in accordance with the principles of elementary language acquisition. However, grammar explanations, arising from the content of reading passages, are limited so as to aid consolidation of the above basic skills.

The units are organized around the rhetorical functions used in scientific study. Each rhetorical function is introduced in a short reading passage and developed further in relevant exercises. As far as possible, reading and writing skills are introduced as they relate to the rhetorical function.

Topics have been carefully selected from the general science curriculum (biology, botany, chemistry, physics and mathematics) to serve as vehicles for presenting the rhetorical functions, syntactic constructions, and vocabulary used frequently in scientific discourse. They reflect an appropriate level of language. They are arranged in ten units which consist of vocabulary and gap-fill passages, skimming and scanning exercises, and further activities to develop effective reading strategies. Specific grammatical points from the reading passages lead on to writing and speaking exercises. EFL students may be familiar with the science concepts that are covered in here but not know how to express and discuss them in English.

The focus of the book, however, is always on language rather than science, and there is no attempt to cover any scientific topic thoroughly. No previous science knowledge is needed by the teacher or student to be able to use this volume effectively for studying and improving their English.

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English for Science, Intermediate Level, First Edition

Published on 2008
$40.00

English For Science, Intermediate Level, is the second volume in the series. It is an integrated text organized around specific rhetorical functions: finding general and specific information, classifying, defining, understanding and using chronological order, determining cause and effect, comparing and contrasting, and predicting.  The text is designed for university students who are studying English as a Foreign Language (EFL) at an intermediate level in order to prepare them to participate in basic science courses in English. It facilitates the leap from basic English to academic English, and it prepares students to comprehend and use science material at an intermediate level.

Unit Organization

            The book emphasizes and integrates the basic skills of speaking, reading, and writing in the context of scientific academic usage. Grammar instruction - based on aspects arising from the reading passages - is restricted so as to aid consolidation of the above basic skills. The introduction of grammatical items is graded and sequenced in accordance with the principles of intermediate language acquisition.

            The units are organized around the rhetorical functions used in scientific study. Each rhetorical function is introduced in a short reading passage and developed further in relevant exercises. As far as possible, reading and writing skills are introduced as they relate to the rhetorical function.

            Topics have been carefully selected from the general science curriculum (biology, botany, chemistry, and physics) to serve as vehicles for presenting the rhetorical functions, syntactic constructions, and vocabulary used frequently in scientific discourse. They reflect an appropriate level of language. They are arranged in ten units. Each unit consists of a brief pre-reading exercise and an exercise on skimming or scanning. Following the reading passage itself, there are post-reading exercises that focus on important reading skills: getting the main idea; understanding the reading structure; understanding

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English for Science, Intermediate Level, First Edition

$40.00

English For Science, Intermediate Level, is the second volume in the series. It is an integrated text organized around specific rhetorical functions: finding general and specific information, classifying, defining, understanding and using chronological order, determining cause and effect, comparing and contrasting, and predicting.  The text is designed for university students who are studying English as a Foreign Language (EFL) at an intermediate level in order to prepare them to participate in basic science courses in English. It facilitates the leap from basic English to academic English, and it prepares students to comprehend and use science material at an intermediate level.

Unit Organization

            The book emphasizes and integrates the basic skills of speaking, reading, and writing in the context of scientific academic usage. Grammar instruction - based on aspects arising from the reading passages - is restricted so as to aid consolidation of the above basic skills. The introduction of grammatical items is graded and sequenced in accordance with the principles of intermediate language acquisition.

            The units are organized around the rhetorical functions used in scientific study. Each rhetorical function is introduced in a short reading passage and developed further in relevant exercises. As far as possible, reading and writing skills are introduced as they relate to the rhetorical function.

            Topics have been carefully selected from the general science curriculum (biology, botany, chemistry, and physics) to serve as vehicles for presenting the rhetorical functions, syntactic constructions, and vocabulary used frequently in scientific discourse. They reflect an appropriate level of language. They are arranged in ten units. Each unit consists of a brief pre-reading exercise and an exercise on skimming or scanning. Following the reading passage itself, there are post-reading exercises that focus on important reading skills: getting the main idea; understanding the reading structure; understanding

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English For Tourism, Elementary Level.

Published on 2006
$40.00
English for Tourism, Elementary Level, is the first book in a two-level course especially designed for leaners of English as a Foreign language who study tourism and archeology as well as for those interested or working in these Fields. English For Tourism is made up of tin thematically based units, Beach of which comprises two Reading selections. The first Reading relates to tourism, and the second one relates to archeology. This text provides a fresh approach to the elementary level. It is based on learning through meaningful motivating activities, relevent topics, critical thinking, active reading, speaking, and purposeful writing. English For Tourism is a comprehensive language coaurse. It covers the language syllabus clearly and thoroughly, giving learners command over from together with extensive fluency practice. The units of the book are divided into a pro-reading orientation activity, and exercise on skimming or scanning , a reading section, comprehension questions, a section on understanding reference, practice understanding signal words, exercises on guessking meaning from context, and a grammar focus section. The material is also organized to provide constant recycling and expansion of knowledgeabout the language and its use.  
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English For Tourism, Elementary Level.

$40.00
English for Tourism, Elementary Level, is the first book in a two-level course especially designed for leaners of English as a Foreign language who study tourism and archeology as well as for those interested or working in these Fields. English For Tourism is made up of tin thematically based units, Beach of which comprises two Reading selections. The first Reading relates to tourism, and the second one relates to archeology. This text provides a fresh approach to the elementary level. It is based on learning through meaningful motivating activities, relevent topics, critical thinking, active reading, speaking, and purposeful writing. English For Tourism is a comprehensive language coaurse. It covers the language syllabus clearly and thoroughly, giving learners command over from together with extensive fluency practice. The units of the book are divided into a pro-reading orientation activity, and exercise on skimming or scanning , a reading section, comprehension questions, a section on understanding reference, practice understanding signal words, exercises on guessking meaning from context, and a grammar focus section. The material is also organized to provide constant recycling and expansion of knowledgeabout the language and its use.  
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English For Tourism, Intermediate Level

Published on 2007
$40.00
English For Tourism, Intermediate Level, is the second book in a two-level course especially designed for learners of English as a Foreign language who study tourism and archeology as well as for those interested or working in these fields.             English For Tourism is made up of ten thematically based units, each of which comprises two reading selections.  The first reading relates to tourism, and the second one relates to archeology. This text provides a fresh approach to the intermediate level. It is based on learning through meaningful motivating activities, relevant topics, critical thinking, active reading, speaking, and purposeful writing.             English For Tourism is a comprehensive language course. It covers the language syllabus clearly and thoroughly, giving learners command over form together with extensive fluency practice. The units of the book are divided into a pre-reading orientation activity, an exercise on skimming or scanning,  a reading section, comprehension questions, a section on understanding reference, practice understanding signal words, exercises on guessing meaning from context, and a grammar focus section.  The material is also organized to provide constant recycling and expansion of knowledge about the language and its use.             English For Tourism offers teachers and students several special features which make it an outstanding course book:
  • A modern approach to the teaching of reading in terms of both content and skills.
  • A wide variety of reading texts taken from authentic tourism and archeology curricula.
  • All language elements (grammar, vocabulary, reading, speaking, and writing skills) developed simultaneously.
  •   A wide variety of vocabulary development exercises to help students understand unfamiliar words and build their own  vocabulary bank.
  •         Grammatical structures are introduced inductively and deductively, accompanied by contextualised practice material.
  • A great variety of rhetorical styles and writing types.
  • Students’ participation and involvement maximized through communicative language activities.
  • Easy to use and teach with clear and straightforward tasks.
  Description of the Course Material Reading Skills The reading material provides the students with a wide variety of topics from authentic tourism and archeology curricula. They are intended to trigger active class discussion, generating functional language while at the same time developing the students’ reading and cognitive skills. Each unit contains two reading selections that focus on important reading skills: getting the main idea, understanding reading structure, identifying paragraph topics, recognizing contextual reference, and making an outline as well as understanding signal words for cause and effect, comparison and contrast, chronological order, examples, classification, etc. The course material offers students a variety of reading comprehension exercises to improve their comprehension and critical thinking. Each unit is introduced through a title page containing the title of the unit, a picture, and a few general questions which can be used in class discussions for topic anticipation and prediction. It also contains a set of comprehension questions varying from multiple choice to short answer questions, true or false exercises, or find the error exercises. Vocabulary Skills The wide variety of vocabulary development exercises is one of the special features of the course.
  1. Guessing Meaning from Context: Students are encouraged to study and learn the vocabulary items explained in the vocabulary preview section and do the vocabulary exercises. They are also encouraged to understand the meaning of unfamiliar words and expressions by looking for context clues. Each unit includes an exercise on guessing meaning from context, which provides practice in context clues skills and highlights the unfamiliar vocabulary used in each unit.
  2. Word Forms: This type of exercises helps students build their vocabulary by learning the functions of prefixes and suffixes as well as word form usage.
  3. Synonyms and Antonyms: These are presented in varied formats and aim at developing students’ vocabulary.
Grammar Skills In this section, grammatical structures are introduced deductively or inductively. In some units, grammatical rules are stated with correct examples of use; in other units, the students study a number of correct examples in order to work out the rules. Ample practice of specific grammatical points as well as holistic linguistic areas are provided in every unit.   Writing Skills Throughout the course material, writing skills are given particular emphasis through recognition of patterns and techniques and production of various kinds of writing patterns. Practice includes  note-taking and outlining and putting words into meaningful sentences, writing accurate sentences. Writing activities are numerous; they range from phrases and short answer responses to complete sentences.   Speaking Skills Speaking skills range from the discussion questions based on the title and the pictures at the beginning of each unit to answering certain exercises orally. In addition, each unit concludes with discussion questions that require students to talk about topics related to the reading.   Language skills and elements, however, are practised and used in an integrated manner - that is, to read, take notes, and speak; or to read, write, and speak, etc. Effort has been made to allow for sensible and natural communication in the classroom environment, as much as possible.
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English For Tourism, Intermediate Level

$40.00
English For Tourism, Intermediate Level, is the second book in a two-level course especially designed for learners of English as a Foreign language who study tourism and archeology as well as for those interested or working in these fields.             English For Tourism is made up of ten thematically based units, each of which comprises two reading selections.  The first reading relates to tourism, and the second one relates to archeology. This text provides a fresh approach to the intermediate level. It is based on learning through meaningful motivating activities, relevant topics, critical thinking, active reading, speaking, and purposeful writing.             English For Tourism is a comprehensive language course. It covers the language syllabus clearly and thoroughly, giving learners command over form together with extensive fluency practice. The units of the book are divided into a pre-reading orientation activity, an exercise on skimming or scanning,  a reading section, comprehension questions, a section on understanding reference, practice understanding signal words, exercises on guessing meaning from context, and a grammar focus section.  The material is also organized to provide constant recycling and expansion of knowledge about the language and its use.             English For Tourism offers teachers and students several special features which make it an outstanding course book:
  • A modern approach to the teaching of reading in terms of both content and skills.
  • A wide variety of reading texts taken from authentic tourism and archeology curricula.
  • All language elements (grammar, vocabulary, reading, speaking, and writing skills) developed simultaneously.
  •   A wide variety of vocabulary development exercises to help students understand unfamiliar words and build their own  vocabulary bank.
  •         Grammatical structures are introduced inductively and deductively, accompanied by contextualised practice material.
  • A great variety of rhetorical styles and writing types.
  • Students’ participation and involvement maximized through communicative language activities.
  • Easy to use and teach with clear and straightforward tasks.
  Description of the Course Material Reading Skills The reading material provides the students with a wide variety of topics from authentic tourism and archeology curricula. They are intended to trigger active class discussion, generating functional language while at the same time developing the students’ reading and cognitive skills. Each unit contains two reading selections that focus on important reading skills: getting the main idea, understanding reading structure, identifying paragraph topics, recognizing contextual reference, and making an outline as well as understanding signal words for cause and effect, comparison and contrast, chronological order, examples, classification, etc. The course material offers students a variety of reading comprehension exercises to improve their comprehension and critical thinking. Each unit is introduced through a title page containing the title of the unit, a picture, and a few general questions which can be used in class discussions for topic anticipation and prediction. It also contains a set of comprehension questions varying from multiple choice to short answer questions, true or false exercises, or find the error exercises. Vocabulary Skills The wide variety of vocabulary development exercises is one of the special features of the course.
  1. Guessing Meaning from Context: Students are encouraged to study and learn the vocabulary items explained in the vocabulary preview section and do the vocabulary exercises. They are also encouraged to understand the meaning of unfamiliar words and expressions by looking for context clues. Each unit includes an exercise on guessing meaning from context, which provides practice in context clues skills and highlights the unfamiliar vocabulary used in each unit.
  2. Word Forms: This type of exercises helps students build their vocabulary by learning the functions of prefixes and suffixes as well as word form usage.
  3. Synonyms and Antonyms: These are presented in varied formats and aim at developing students’ vocabulary.
Grammar Skills In this section, grammatical structures are introduced deductively or inductively. In some units, grammatical rules are stated with correct examples of use; in other units, the students study a number of correct examples in order to work out the rules. Ample practice of specific grammatical points as well as holistic linguistic areas are provided in every unit.   Writing Skills Throughout the course material, writing skills are given particular emphasis through recognition of patterns and techniques and production of various kinds of writing patterns. Practice includes  note-taking and outlining and putting words into meaningful sentences, writing accurate sentences. Writing activities are numerous; they range from phrases and short answer responses to complete sentences.   Speaking Skills Speaking skills range from the discussion questions based on the title and the pictures at the beginning of each unit to answering certain exercises orally. In addition, each unit concludes with discussion questions that require students to talk about topics related to the reading.   Language skills and elements, however, are practised and used in an integrated manner - that is, to read, take notes, and speak; or to read, write, and speak, etc. Effort has been made to allow for sensible and natural communication in the classroom environment, as much as possible.
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English for Veterinary Sciences, Elementary Level

Published on 2018
$40.00

English for Veterinary Sciences, Elementary, is a reading textbook for

students of English as a Foreign Language (EFL) who have a basic knowledge of

English. It is designed primarily for veterinary-science students, veterinarians,

and other professionals with an interest in learning veterinary-science English.

English for Veterinary Sciences, Elementary, is made up of twelve

thematically-based units, each of which contains one reading. skillbuilding

and vocabulary-building activities accompany each reading.

An important goal of English for Veterinary Sciences is to help students

become confident readers by increasing their vocabulary base and improving

their word-comprehension skills. It engages them in the process of reading

thoughtfully and encourages them to move beyond merely passive reading. To

accomplish this, the book addresses the reading process in a direct manner, and

various reading and vocabulary skills are presented as part of that process. The

instruction and practice with reading skills help students increase their reading

fluency, and equip them with skills they need for academic achievement.

Focus on vocabulary-building promotes their language acquisition and

academic advancement. Also, the lexical and syntactic content of the readings

has been controlled. The tasks are varied, accessible, and engaging, and they

provide stimuli for frequent student-teacher and student-student interaction.

Student awareness of reading and thinking processes is further encouraged

in many parts of the book by exercises which require students to work in pairs

or small groups. In discussions with others, students formulate and articulate

their ideas more precisely, and so they acquire new ways of talking and thinking

about a text. These activities present opportunities for real-world contact and

real-world use of language. Students are asked to write, and then to read each

other’s work so they can experience the connection between reading and writing.

Traditionally reading classes are based on one of two approaches: in

one approach, class time is primarily spent with students doing individual

reading and exercise-completion; in the other, class time is devoted to group

discussions of the reading and exercise-completion. Because both approaches

are important, this book integrates them by alternating reading activities with

speaking and writing activities.iv

Within each unit, students will not only practice reading, but they will

also receive instruction in various skills and strategies incorporated into the

reading process.

The basic format of each unit in English for Veterinary Sciences is as follows:

Before Reading

These pre-reading questions serve to introduce the topic of the reading

and get students thinking about that topic. Activating prior knowledge

allows students to tap into what they already know and then build on

that knowledge, and stirs curiosity. The questions are based on relevant

pictures, posters, or diagrams and allow students to interact with each other.

Vocabulary Preview

A number of key words and phrases which are common in veterinaryscience

English are explained in simple English and illustrated with

appropriate pictures. These are followed by a fill-in-the-blanks exercise to

make sure that students understand the words and can use them in context.

Understanding is crucial to language acquisition.

Scanning and Skimming

In this section, students are asked to scan the reading for specific

information, or to skim it for main ideas and other general information.

After Reading

In this section a variety of skill-building and vocabulary-building

exercises is introduced: determining the main idea; understanding reading

structure; guessing meaning from context; recognizing contextual reference;

finding topics and topic sentences; understanding signal words; making

an outline; understanding cause and effect; understanding antonyms and

synonyms, etc. These dynamic skill and vocabulary acquisition exercises

ensure that students will develop and acquire the important reading skills and

vocabulary needed to make them good readers.

Each unit concludes with discussion questions designed to encourage

students to think about, distil, and exchange views about the information they

have been presented with throughout the unit. Following the discussion, the

students are requested to write down answers to the discussion questions, a

place for students to reflect in writing on the learning in the unit.

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English for Veterinary Sciences, Elementary Level

$40.00

English for Veterinary Sciences, Elementary, is a reading textbook for

students of English as a Foreign Language (EFL) who have a basic knowledge of

English. It is designed primarily for veterinary-science students, veterinarians,

and other professionals with an interest in learning veterinary-science English.

English for Veterinary Sciences, Elementary, is made up of twelve

thematically-based units, each of which contains one reading. skillbuilding

and vocabulary-building activities accompany each reading.

An important goal of English for Veterinary Sciences is to help students

become confident readers by increasing their vocabulary base and improving

their word-comprehension skills. It engages them in the process of reading

thoughtfully and encourages them to move beyond merely passive reading. To

accomplish this, the book addresses the reading process in a direct manner, and

various reading and vocabulary skills are presented as part of that process. The

instruction and practice with reading skills help students increase their reading

fluency, and equip them with skills they need for academic achievement.

Focus on vocabulary-building promotes their language acquisition and

academic advancement. Also, the lexical and syntactic content of the readings

has been controlled. The tasks are varied, accessible, and engaging, and they

provide stimuli for frequent student-teacher and student-student interaction.

Student awareness of reading and thinking processes is further encouraged

in many parts of the book by exercises which require students to work in pairs

or small groups. In discussions with others, students formulate and articulate

their ideas more precisely, and so they acquire new ways of talking and thinking

about a text. These activities present opportunities for real-world contact and

real-world use of language. Students are asked to write, and then to read each

other’s work so they can experience the connection between reading and writing.

Traditionally reading classes are based on one of two approaches: in

one approach, class time is primarily spent with students doing individual

reading and exercise-completion; in the other, class time is devoted to group

discussions of the reading and exercise-completion. Because both approaches

are important, this book integrates them by alternating reading activities with

speaking and writing activities.iv

Within each unit, students will not only practice reading, but they will

also receive instruction in various skills and strategies incorporated into the

reading process.

The basic format of each unit in English for Veterinary Sciences is as follows:

Before Reading

These pre-reading questions serve to introduce the topic of the reading

and get students thinking about that topic. Activating prior knowledge

allows students to tap into what they already know and then build on

that knowledge, and stirs curiosity. The questions are based on relevant

pictures, posters, or diagrams and allow students to interact with each other.

Vocabulary Preview

A number of key words and phrases which are common in veterinaryscience

English are explained in simple English and illustrated with

appropriate pictures. These are followed by a fill-in-the-blanks exercise to

make sure that students understand the words and can use them in context.

Understanding is crucial to language acquisition.

Scanning and Skimming

In this section, students are asked to scan the reading for specific

information, or to skim it for main ideas and other general information.

After Reading

In this section a variety of skill-building and vocabulary-building

exercises is introduced: determining the main idea; understanding reading

structure; guessing meaning from context; recognizing contextual reference;

finding topics and topic sentences; understanding signal words; making

an outline; understanding cause and effect; understanding antonyms and

synonyms, etc. These dynamic skill and vocabulary acquisition exercises

ensure that students will develop and acquire the important reading skills and

vocabulary needed to make them good readers.

Each unit concludes with discussion questions designed to encourage

students to think about, distil, and exchange views about the information they

have been presented with throughout the unit. Following the discussion, the

students are requested to write down answers to the discussion questions, a

place for students to reflect in writing on the learning in the unit.

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English Grammar for Health Professions, Elementary Level. First Edition.

Published on 2008
$40.00
English Grammar for Health Professions, Elementary Level, is a developmental skills text designed for health-science students of English as a Foreign Language pursuing a medical and paramedical qualification at universities, colleges, or institutes. It presents fundamental structures and vocabulary appropriate for health-science students at an elementary level. The book provides ample opportunities for practice through extensive and varied exercises. While focusing on grammar, the book actively promotes the development of writing skills (and by extension reading skills) as well as situationally-appropriate language use in the medical and paramedical fields. It helps students write correctly and thus enables clear and effective communication. Notes to the Teacher Level English Grammar for Health Professions, Elementary Level, is designed to meet the needs of health-science students at the elementary level. It is the first in a series of two EFL grammar texts. The second in the series is directed towards lower-intermediate and intermediate students. Presentation of Grammar Each unit is presented using tables of examples accompanied by explanations. The examples are mostly intended to be almost self-explanatory. Explanations are simplified as much as possible, with a minimum of technical terminology. Still, the students may not be able to immediately grasp some parts of the tables by themselves. The intention is that you use the tables as a springboard in class. You may wish to discuss your own examples drawn from the immediate classroom context and relate them to the examples in the text as preparation for usage exercises. At times you may wish to begin a usage exercise immediately, then discuss form and meaning during the course of the exercise, and finally return to the appropriate table for the purpose of summarizing the points being studied. The grammar tables are intended 1) as starting points and 2) for later reference, rather than as out-of-class homework assignments. Vocabulary The book views vocabulary as integral to the development of structure usage ability. Vocabulary is introduced and reinforced regularly. At times you will find it necessary to spend time in class discussing new vocabulary during exercises, given the medical and scientific nature of the exercises. The introduction of vocabulary is controlled so that it can be understood in the classroom. So students should not have to spend a great deal of time at home looking up words in their dictionaries. Some exercises are specifically designed to promote vocabulary acquisition while the students are practising structure usage. Exercises The exercises aim at helping students to talk about medical and paramedical situations as soon as possible using the target structures. In general, the exercises in any given unit move from ones that focus on manipulation of form and meaning to ones that demand more independent input and involve a combination of skills. There is a variety of exercise types including multiple choice, fill-in-the-blanks, sentence-combining, verb-form correcting, asking and answering questions, etc. The exercises lead students from recognition to production. Most exercises, other than the oral exercises, are intended for students to complete outside the class and in the class. Typically, a teacher might discuss the grammar in a table, have the students do the first three or four entries of an exercise in the class, and then assign the rest of the exercise to be done for the next class. Usually students benefit more from doing exercises at home than they do from going through them in class. Exercises that the students have done at home take less class time to discuss and lead to more fruitful discussion. CONTENTS UNIT 1: Identifying Medical Professions UNIT 2: Indicating Possession UNIT 3: Identifying Medical Items UNIT 4: Describing Location UNIT 5: Expressing Time UNIT 6: Expressing Possession (1) with Have UNIT 7: Describing Possession (2) UNIT 8: Expressing Possession (3) UNIT 9: Expressing Possession (4) UNIT 10: Describing Medical Conditions (1) UNIT 11: Describing Medical Conditions (2) UNIT 12: Describing Facts and Habits UNIT 13: Giving Instructions UNIT 14: Describing Actions UNIT 15: Describing Activities in Progress UNIT 16: Describing States and Situations UNIT 17: Expressing Past Activities and Situations UNIT 18: Expressing Past Habits and Situations UNIT 19: Expressing the General and the Specific UNIT 20: Expressing Quantities (1) UNIT 21: Expressing Activities and Situations in Progress in the Past UNIT 22: Expressing Future Activities and Situations UNIT 23: Expressing Ability UNIT 24: Expressing Possibility UNIT 25: Expressing Permission UNIT 26: Expressing Request UNIT 27: Expressing Sequences UNIT 28: Comparisons UNIT 29: Comparatives UNIT 30: Superlatives
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English Grammar for Health Professions, Elementary Level. First Edition.

$40.00
English Grammar for Health Professions, Elementary Level, is a developmental skills text designed for health-science students of English as a Foreign Language pursuing a medical and paramedical qualification at universities, colleges, or institutes. It presents fundamental structures and vocabulary appropriate for health-science students at an elementary level. The book provides ample opportunities for practice through extensive and varied exercises. While focusing on grammar, the book actively promotes the development of writing skills (and by extension reading skills) as well as situationally-appropriate language use in the medical and paramedical fields. It helps students write correctly and thus enables clear and effective communication. Notes to the Teacher Level English Grammar for Health Professions, Elementary Level, is designed to meet the needs of health-science students at the elementary level. It is the first in a series of two EFL grammar texts. The second in the series is directed towards lower-intermediate and intermediate students. Presentation of Grammar Each unit is presented using tables of examples accompanied by explanations. The examples are mostly intended to be almost self-explanatory. Explanations are simplified as much as possible, with a minimum of technical terminology. Still, the students may not be able to immediately grasp some parts of the tables by themselves. The intention is that you use the tables as a springboard in class. You may wish to discuss your own examples drawn from the immediate classroom context and relate them to the examples in the text as preparation for usage exercises. At times you may wish to begin a usage exercise immediately, then discuss form and meaning during the course of the exercise, and finally return to the appropriate table for the purpose of summarizing the points being studied. The grammar tables are intended 1) as starting points and 2) for later reference, rather than as out-of-class homework assignments. Vocabulary The book views vocabulary as integral to the development of structure usage ability. Vocabulary is introduced and reinforced regularly. At times you will find it necessary to spend time in class discussing new vocabulary during exercises, given the medical and scientific nature of the exercises. The introduction of vocabulary is controlled so that it can be understood in the classroom. So students should not have to spend a great deal of time at home looking up words in their dictionaries. Some exercises are specifically designed to promote vocabulary acquisition while the students are practising structure usage. Exercises The exercises aim at helping students to talk about medical and paramedical situations as soon as possible using the target structures. In general, the exercises in any given unit move from ones that focus on manipulation of form and meaning to ones that demand more independent input and involve a combination of skills. There is a variety of exercise types including multiple choice, fill-in-the-blanks, sentence-combining, verb-form correcting, asking and answering questions, etc. The exercises lead students from recognition to production. Most exercises, other than the oral exercises, are intended for students to complete outside the class and in the class. Typically, a teacher might discuss the grammar in a table, have the students do the first three or four entries of an exercise in the class, and then assign the rest of the exercise to be done for the next class. Usually students benefit more from doing exercises at home than they do from going through them in class. Exercises that the students have done at home take less class time to discuss and lead to more fruitful discussion. CONTENTS UNIT 1: Identifying Medical Professions UNIT 2: Indicating Possession UNIT 3: Identifying Medical Items UNIT 4: Describing Location UNIT 5: Expressing Time UNIT 6: Expressing Possession (1) with Have UNIT 7: Describing Possession (2) UNIT 8: Expressing Possession (3) UNIT 9: Expressing Possession (4) UNIT 10: Describing Medical Conditions (1) UNIT 11: Describing Medical Conditions (2) UNIT 12: Describing Facts and Habits UNIT 13: Giving Instructions UNIT 14: Describing Actions UNIT 15: Describing Activities in Progress UNIT 16: Describing States and Situations UNIT 17: Expressing Past Activities and Situations UNIT 18: Expressing Past Habits and Situations UNIT 19: Expressing the General and the Specific UNIT 20: Expressing Quantities (1) UNIT 21: Expressing Activities and Situations in Progress in the Past UNIT 22: Expressing Future Activities and Situations UNIT 23: Expressing Ability UNIT 24: Expressing Possibility UNIT 25: Expressing Permission UNIT 26: Expressing Request UNIT 27: Expressing Sequences UNIT 28: Comparisons UNIT 29: Comparatives UNIT 30: Superlatives
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English Grammar for Health Professions, Intermediate Level. First Edition

Published on 2011
$40.00
PREFACE English Grammar For Health Professions, Intermediate Level, is a developmental skills text designed for health students of English as a Foreign language who are pursuing a medical and/or paramedical programme at universities, colleges, or institues. It presents fundamental structures and vocabulary appropriate for health students at an intermediate level. The book provides ample opportunities for practice through extensive and varied exercises. While focusing on grammar, the book actively promotes the development of writing skills (and by extension reading skills) as well as situationally appropriate language use in the medical and paramedical fields. Thus, it helps learners write correctly so that they can communicate clearly and effectively. Notes to the Teacher Level English Grammar For Health Professions, Intermediate Level, is designed to meet the needs of health students at the lower-intermediate and intermediate levels. CONTENTS UNIT 1: Asking for Information UNIT 2: Asking for Information UNIT 3: Asking for Information about Possession UNIT 4: Asking about Frequency and Length of Time UNIT 5: Asking for Confirmation UNIT 6: Expressing Factual and Habitual Actions UNIT 7: Describing Actions and Activities in Progress UNIT 8: Expressing Past Events and Activities UNIT 9: Describing Actions and Activities in Progress in the Past UNIT 10: Describing What Has Happened UNIT 11: What Has Been Happening UNIT 12: What Had Happened UNIT 13: What Had Been Happening UNIT 14: Expressing Necessity UNIT 15: Expressing Advice UNIT 16: Passive Voice: Simple Present and Present Continuous UNIT 17: Passive Voice: Simple Past and Past Continuous Tenses UNIT 18: Passive Voice: Present Perfect Tense UNIT 19: Passive Voice: Past Perfect Tense UNIT 20: Passive Voice with Modals UNIT 21: Gerunds: Subject and Object UNIT 22: Gerunds after Prepositions UNIT 23: Infinitives after Certain Verbs UNIT 24: Excess and Insufficiency UNIT 25: Expressing a Cause and Effect Relationship UNIT 26: Expressing Purpose UNIT 27: Expressing Purpose UNIT 28: Adjective Clauses with Subject Relative Pronouns UNIT 29: Adjective Clauses with Object Relative Pronouns UNIT 30: Using Prepositions in Adjective Clauses UNIT 31: Reporting Statements UNIT 32: Reporting Questions UNIT 33: Reporting Imperatives UNIT 34: Expressing Unreal Conditionals: Present UNIT 35: Expressing Unreal Conditionals: Past UNIT 36: Expressing Linking UNIT 37: Expressing Linking UNIT 38: Expressing Linking
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English Grammar for Health Professions, Intermediate Level. First Edition

$40.00
PREFACE English Grammar For Health Professions, Intermediate Level, is a developmental skills text designed for health students of English as a Foreign language who are pursuing a medical and/or paramedical programme at universities, colleges, or institues. It presents fundamental structures and vocabulary appropriate for health students at an intermediate level. The book provides ample opportunities for practice through extensive and varied exercises. While focusing on grammar, the book actively promotes the development of writing skills (and by extension reading skills) as well as situationally appropriate language use in the medical and paramedical fields. Thus, it helps learners write correctly so that they can communicate clearly and effectively. Notes to the Teacher Level English Grammar For Health Professions, Intermediate Level, is designed to meet the needs of health students at the lower-intermediate and intermediate levels. CONTENTS UNIT 1: Asking for Information UNIT 2: Asking for Information UNIT 3: Asking for Information about Possession UNIT 4: Asking about Frequency and Length of Time UNIT 5: Asking for Confirmation UNIT 6: Expressing Factual and Habitual Actions UNIT 7: Describing Actions and Activities in Progress UNIT 8: Expressing Past Events and Activities UNIT 9: Describing Actions and Activities in Progress in the Past UNIT 10: Describing What Has Happened UNIT 11: What Has Been Happening UNIT 12: What Had Happened UNIT 13: What Had Been Happening UNIT 14: Expressing Necessity UNIT 15: Expressing Advice UNIT 16: Passive Voice: Simple Present and Present Continuous UNIT 17: Passive Voice: Simple Past and Past Continuous Tenses UNIT 18: Passive Voice: Present Perfect Tense UNIT 19: Passive Voice: Past Perfect Tense UNIT 20: Passive Voice with Modals UNIT 21: Gerunds: Subject and Object UNIT 22: Gerunds after Prepositions UNIT 23: Infinitives after Certain Verbs UNIT 24: Excess and Insufficiency UNIT 25: Expressing a Cause and Effect Relationship UNIT 26: Expressing Purpose UNIT 27: Expressing Purpose UNIT 28: Adjective Clauses with Subject Relative Pronouns UNIT 29: Adjective Clauses with Object Relative Pronouns UNIT 30: Using Prepositions in Adjective Clauses UNIT 31: Reporting Statements UNIT 32: Reporting Questions UNIT 33: Reporting Imperatives UNIT 34: Expressing Unreal Conditionals: Present UNIT 35: Expressing Unreal Conditionals: Past UNIT 36: Expressing Linking UNIT 37: Expressing Linking UNIT 38: Expressing Linking
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English Placement Test (EPT) Prep., First Edition

Published on 2023
$40.00

English Placement Test (EPT) Prep. is designed to prepare students and other professionals including language teachers to write the EPT. Several universities, colleges, and other academic institutions use this test for purposes such as academic placement, student assessment, program evaluation, professional certification, hiring, and promotional qualification.

The EPT is a test of English language abilities that measures the English proficiency levels of students and others wishing to join academic or professional programs. It is based on the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages, and popular options include IELTS and TOEFL.

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English Placement Test (EPT) Prep., First Edition

$40.00

English Placement Test (EPT) Prep. is designed to prepare students and other professionals including language teachers to write the EPT. Several universities, colleges, and other academic institutions use this test for purposes such as academic placement, student assessment, program evaluation, professional certification, hiring, and promotional qualification.

The EPT is a test of English language abilities that measures the English proficiency levels of students and others wishing to join academic or professional programs. It is based on the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages, and popular options include IELTS and TOEFL.

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Essentials of English for Specific Purposes, Lower Intermediate Level

Published on 2009
$40.00

ESSENTIALS OF ENGLISH FOR SPECIFIC PURPOSES,

INTEGRATED SKILLS, is a theme-based, two-level, ESP series designed to

prepare students for college and university-level specialized content. In order to

facilitate academic success, the series combines communicative activities with skill based exercises in listening, speaking, reading, writing, and grammar. It encompasses

a wide range of college and university specialties: business and office management,

banking, accounting, marketing, tourism, health sciences, and the hotel service

industry. Essentials of English focuses on the real needs of ESP students who

require vocational English in order to help them deal with various majors at college

and university.

To achieve this goal, topics are carefully selected from authentic relevant

materials covering a variety of college and university courses. This exposes students

to the realities of specialized language requirements so they may gauge their own

needs according to their individual stage of language acquisition. The materials are

interwoven and interrelated to create cohesion and homogeneity in terms of themes,

vocabulary, grammar, listening, and speaking activities. Spiral recycling is also

maintained throughout the book.

ESSENTIALS OF ENGLISH FOR SPECIFIC PURPOSES,

INTEGRATED SKILLS is made up of eight thematically-based units. Each unit

consists of listening, speaking, reading, writing, and grammar.

The Before Listening, Listening, and After Listening sections activate

students’ prior knowledge, guide them to listen for main ideas and specific

information, and increase their understanding through comprehension questions and

vocabulary recycling. Various task-based practice exercises reinforce listening

comprehension.

The Vocabulary Preview introduces students to new vocabulary in the

listening and reading sections. The listening sections increase students’ listening

comprehension through task-based practice. Pictures provide valuable context for

each topic.

The Before Reading, Reading, and After Reading sections provide

scaffolding to help students build an understanding of authentic language. It does so

by assisting them in the identification of main ideas while reinforcing understanding

through the use of comprehension questions. In addition, language-learning strategies

such as making good guesses about vocabulary and understanding pronoun reference

provide students with the reading-comprehension tools they require. Students also

have the opportunity to generate language in a semi-controlled format through

discussions and writing exercises. Students are encouraged to contribute their own

opinions on subjects related to the various units.

The Grammar section contains explanations and charts that provide clear,

easy-to-understand, and visually-appealing grammar presentations. The exercises

in this section give students controlled practice of specific grammatical points, as

well as some freer, communicative-based practice.

Writing exercises, in the form of controlled writing practice, develop naturally

from the reading and grammar sections.

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Essentials of English for Specific Purposes, Lower Intermediate Level

$40.00

ESSENTIALS OF ENGLISH FOR SPECIFIC PURPOSES,

INTEGRATED SKILLS, is a theme-based, two-level, ESP series designed to

prepare students for college and university-level specialized content. In order to

facilitate academic success, the series combines communicative activities with skill based exercises in listening, speaking, reading, writing, and grammar. It encompasses

a wide range of college and university specialties: business and office management,

banking, accounting, marketing, tourism, health sciences, and the hotel service

industry. Essentials of English focuses on the real needs of ESP students who

require vocational English in order to help them deal with various majors at college

and university.

To achieve this goal, topics are carefully selected from authentic relevant

materials covering a variety of college and university courses. This exposes students

to the realities of specialized language requirements so they may gauge their own

needs according to their individual stage of language acquisition. The materials are

interwoven and interrelated to create cohesion and homogeneity in terms of themes,

vocabulary, grammar, listening, and speaking activities. Spiral recycling is also

maintained throughout the book.

ESSENTIALS OF ENGLISH FOR SPECIFIC PURPOSES,

INTEGRATED SKILLS is made up of eight thematically-based units. Each unit

consists of listening, speaking, reading, writing, and grammar.

The Before Listening, Listening, and After Listening sections activate

students’ prior knowledge, guide them to listen for main ideas and specific

information, and increase their understanding through comprehension questions and

vocabulary recycling. Various task-based practice exercises reinforce listening

comprehension.

The Vocabulary Preview introduces students to new vocabulary in the

listening and reading sections. The listening sections increase students’ listening

comprehension through task-based practice. Pictures provide valuable context for

each topic.

The Before Reading, Reading, and After Reading sections provide

scaffolding to help students build an understanding of authentic language. It does so

by assisting them in the identification of main ideas while reinforcing understanding

through the use of comprehension questions. In addition, language-learning strategies

such as making good guesses about vocabulary and understanding pronoun reference

provide students with the reading-comprehension tools they require. Students also

have the opportunity to generate language in a semi-controlled format through

discussions and writing exercises. Students are encouraged to contribute their own

opinions on subjects related to the various units.

The Grammar section contains explanations and charts that provide clear,

easy-to-understand, and visually-appealing grammar presentations. The exercises

in this section give students controlled practice of specific grammatical points, as

well as some freer, communicative-based practice.

Writing exercises, in the form of controlled writing practice, develop naturally

from the reading and grammar sections.

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ESSENTIALS OF ENGLISH FOR SPECIFIC PURPOSES,INTEGRATED SKILLS, ELMENTARY LEVEL, First Edition

Published on 2009
$40.00
INTEGRATED SKILLS, is a theme-based, two-level, ESP series designed to prepare students for college and university-level specialized content. In order to facilitate academic success, the series combines communicative activities with skill based exercises in listening, speaking, reading, writing, and grammar. It encompasses a wide range of college and university specialties: business and office management, banking, accounting, marketing, tourism, health sciences, and the hotel service industry. Essentials of English focuses on the real needs of ESP students who require vocational English in order to help them deal with various majors at college and university. To achieve this goal, topics are carefully selected from authentic relevant materials covering a variety of college and university courses. This exposes students to the realities of specialized language requirements so they may gauge their own needs according to their individual stage of language acquisition. The materials are interwoven and interrelated to create cohesion and homogeneity in terms of themes, vocabulary, grammar, listening, and speaking activities. Spiral recycling is also maintained throughout the book. ESSENTIALS OF ENGLISH FOR SPECIFIC PURPOSES, INTEGRATED SKILLS is made up of eight thematically-based units. Each unit consists of listening, speaking, reading, writing, and grammar. The Before Listening, Listening, and After Listening sections activate students’ prior knowledge, guide them to listen for main ideas and specific information, and increase their understanding through comprehension questions and vocabulary recycling. Various task-based practice exercises reinforce listening comprehension. The Vocabulary Preview introduces students to new vocabulary in the listening and reading sections. The listening sections increase students’ listening comprehension through task-based practice. Pictures provide valuable context for each topic. The Before Reading, Reading, and After Reading sections provide scaffolding to help students build an understanding of authentic language. It does so by assisting them in the identification of main ideas while reinforcing understanding through the use of comprehension questions. In addition, language-learning strategies such as making good guesses about vocabulary and understanding pronoun reference provide students with the reading-comprehension tools they require. Students also have the opportunity to generate language in a semi-controlled format through discussions and writing exercises. Students are encouraged to contribute their own opinions on subjects related to the various units. The Grammar section contains explanations and charts that provide clear, easy-to-understand, and visually-appealing grammar presentations. The exercises in this section give students controlled practice of specific grammatical points, as well as some freer, communicative-based practice. Writing exercises, in the form of controlled writing practice, develop naturally from the reading and grammar sections.
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ESSENTIALS OF ENGLISH FOR SPECIFIC PURPOSES,INTEGRATED SKILLS, ELMENTARY LEVEL, First Edition

$40.00
INTEGRATED SKILLS, is a theme-based, two-level, ESP series designed to prepare students for college and university-level specialized content. In order to facilitate academic success, the series combines communicative activities with skill based exercises in listening, speaking, reading, writing, and grammar. It encompasses a wide range of college and university specialties: business and office management, banking, accounting, marketing, tourism, health sciences, and the hotel service industry. Essentials of English focuses on the real needs of ESP students who require vocational English in order to help them deal with various majors at college and university. To achieve this goal, topics are carefully selected from authentic relevant materials covering a variety of college and university courses. This exposes students to the realities of specialized language requirements so they may gauge their own needs according to their individual stage of language acquisition. The materials are interwoven and interrelated to create cohesion and homogeneity in terms of themes, vocabulary, grammar, listening, and speaking activities. Spiral recycling is also maintained throughout the book. ESSENTIALS OF ENGLISH FOR SPECIFIC PURPOSES, INTEGRATED SKILLS is made up of eight thematically-based units. Each unit consists of listening, speaking, reading, writing, and grammar. The Before Listening, Listening, and After Listening sections activate students’ prior knowledge, guide them to listen for main ideas and specific information, and increase their understanding through comprehension questions and vocabulary recycling. Various task-based practice exercises reinforce listening comprehension. The Vocabulary Preview introduces students to new vocabulary in the listening and reading sections. The listening sections increase students’ listening comprehension through task-based practice. Pictures provide valuable context for each topic. The Before Reading, Reading, and After Reading sections provide scaffolding to help students build an understanding of authentic language. It does so by assisting them in the identification of main ideas while reinforcing understanding through the use of comprehension questions. In addition, language-learning strategies such as making good guesses about vocabulary and understanding pronoun reference provide students with the reading-comprehension tools they require. Students also have the opportunity to generate language in a semi-controlled format through discussions and writing exercises. Students are encouraged to contribute their own opinions on subjects related to the various units. The Grammar section contains explanations and charts that provide clear, easy-to-understand, and visually-appealing grammar presentations. The exercises in this section give students controlled practice of specific grammatical points, as well as some freer, communicative-based practice. Writing exercises, in the form of controlled writing practice, develop naturally from the reading and grammar sections.
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Foundation 1 Integrated Skills, Low Intermediate

Published on 2009
$40.00

Welcome to the second edition of FOUNDATION, INTEGRATED SKILLS. This new edition is the product of ongoing revision and evaluation, not only by myself, but also by the many instructors who, along with their students, have used the previous edition and have contributed valuable suggestions and comments. The success of the previous edition has been due, in large measure, to the honest and careful appraisal given by instructors and their students.

            FOUNDATION, INTEGRATED SKILLS, is a theme-based, two-level, EFL series designed to prepare students for university-level academic content. The series combines communicative activities with skill-based exercises in listening, speaking, reading, writing, and grammar in order to facilitate academic success. It focuses on the real needs of Arab students intending to go to university, and prepares them to enter university courses after the completion of this series.

            FOUNDATION, INTEGRATED SKILLS, is made up of eight thematically-based units. Each unit consists of listening, speaking, reading, writing, and grammar activities and explanations.

            The Before Listening, Listening, and After Listening sections activate students’ prior knowledge, guide them to listen for main ideas and specific information, and increase their understanding through comprehension questions and vocabulary recycling.  Various task-based practice exercises reinforce their listening comprehension.

            The speaking activities develop naturally from listening, reading, and grammar exercises and take various forms: comprehension questions answered orally in complete sentences; vocabulary reviews that reinforce understanding and improve learner ability to communicate with the new vocabulary and so on; talking about pictures; and authentic speaking opportunities in a variety of formats such as interviews, surveys, scenarios.  All these speaking activities aim at enhancing students’ fluency, building confidence by linking understanding to production, and improving overall ability to communicate effectively.

            The Vocabulary Preview introduces the students to new vocabulary appearing in the listening and reading sections. The listening sections increase student listening comprehension through task-based practice. Pictures provide valuable context for each topic.

            The  Before Reading, Reading, and After Reading sections provide scaffolding to help students build to understanding authentic language and identifying main ideas, while reinforcing said understanding through comprehension questions.  Language-learning strategies such as making reasonable guesses about vocabulary and understanding pronoun reference provide students with reading comprehension tools.  Students also have the opportunity to generate language in a semi-controlled format, with discussion and writing exercises encouraging students to contribute their own opinions on subjects of student interest related to the various unit topics.

            The Grammar section contains explanations and charts, which provide clear, easy-to-understand, and visually-appealing grammar presentations.  The exercises in this section give students controlled practice of specific grammatical points, as well as some freer practice with more communicative exercises.

            Writing exercises develop naturally from the listening, speaking, reading and grammar sections. They are in the form of guided writing practice.

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Foundation 1 Integrated Skills, Low Intermediate

$40.00

Welcome to the second edition of FOUNDATION, INTEGRATED SKILLS. This new edition is the product of ongoing revision and evaluation, not only by myself, but also by the many instructors who, along with their students, have used the previous edition and have contributed valuable suggestions and comments. The success of the previous edition has been due, in large measure, to the honest and careful appraisal given by instructors and their students.

            FOUNDATION, INTEGRATED SKILLS, is a theme-based, two-level, EFL series designed to prepare students for university-level academic content. The series combines communicative activities with skill-based exercises in listening, speaking, reading, writing, and grammar in order to facilitate academic success. It focuses on the real needs of Arab students intending to go to university, and prepares them to enter university courses after the completion of this series.

            FOUNDATION, INTEGRATED SKILLS, is made up of eight thematically-based units. Each unit consists of listening, speaking, reading, writing, and grammar activities and explanations.

            The Before Listening, Listening, and After Listening sections activate students’ prior knowledge, guide them to listen for main ideas and specific information, and increase their understanding through comprehension questions and vocabulary recycling.  Various task-based practice exercises reinforce their listening comprehension.

            The speaking activities develop naturally from listening, reading, and grammar exercises and take various forms: comprehension questions answered orally in complete sentences; vocabulary reviews that reinforce understanding and improve learner ability to communicate with the new vocabulary and so on; talking about pictures; and authentic speaking opportunities in a variety of formats such as interviews, surveys, scenarios.  All these speaking activities aim at enhancing students’ fluency, building confidence by linking understanding to production, and improving overall ability to communicate effectively.

            The Vocabulary Preview introduces the students to new vocabulary appearing in the listening and reading sections. The listening sections increase student listening comprehension through task-based practice. Pictures provide valuable context for each topic.

            The  Before Reading, Reading, and After Reading sections provide scaffolding to help students build to understanding authentic language and identifying main ideas, while reinforcing said understanding through comprehension questions.  Language-learning strategies such as making reasonable guesses about vocabulary and understanding pronoun reference provide students with reading comprehension tools.  Students also have the opportunity to generate language in a semi-controlled format, with discussion and writing exercises encouraging students to contribute their own opinions on subjects of student interest related to the various unit topics.

            The Grammar section contains explanations and charts, which provide clear, easy-to-understand, and visually-appealing grammar presentations.  The exercises in this section give students controlled practice of specific grammatical points, as well as some freer practice with more communicative exercises.

            Writing exercises develop naturally from the listening, speaking, reading and grammar sections. They are in the form of guided writing practice.

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Foundation 1: Reading Skills, Elementary Level, First Edition

Published on 2010
$40.00

Foundations: Reading Skills is a four-level-reading textbook for students of English as a Foreign Language (EFL) who have a basic knowledge of English. It is designed primarily to help students prepare for studying in English–medium academic courses.

Foundations: Reading Skills is comprised of ten thematically-based units, each of which contains two readings. Skill-building and vocabulary-building activities accompany each reading.

An important goal of Foundations: Reading Skills is to help students become confident readers by increasing their vocabulary base and improving their word-comprehension skills. It engages them in the process of reading thoughtfully and encourages them to move beyond merely passive reading. To accomplish this, the book addresses the reading process in a direct manner, and various reading and vocabulary skills are presented as part of that process. The instruction and practice with reading skills help students increase their reading fluency, and equip them with skills they need for academic achievement. Focus on vocabulary-building promotes their language acquisition and academic advancement. Also, the lexical and syntactic content of the readings has been controlled. The tasks are varied, accessible, and engaging, and they provide stimuli for frequent student-teacher and student student

interaction.

Student awareness of reading and thinking processes is further encouraged in many parts of the book by exercises which require students to work in pairs or small groups. In discussions with others, students formulate and articulate their ideas more precisely, and so they acquire new ways of talking and thinking about a text. These activities present opportunities for real-world contact and real-world use of language. Students are asked to write, and then to read each other’s work so they can experience

the connection between reading and writing.

Traditionally reading classes are based on one of two approaches: in one approach, class time is primarily spent with students doing individual reading and exercise-completion; in the other, class time is devoted to group discussions of the reading and exercise-completion. Because both approaches are important, this book integrates them by alternating reading activities with speaking and/or writing activities.

Within each unit, students will not only practice reading, but they will also receive instruction in various skills and strategies incorporated into the reading process.

The basic format of each unit in Foundations: Reading Skills is as follows:

Before Reading

These pre-reading questions serve to introduce the topic of the reading and get students thinking about that topic. Activating prior knowledge allows students to tap into what they already know and then build on that knowledge, and stirs curiosity. The questions allow students to interact with each other.

Vocabulary Preview

A number of key words which are common in everyday and academic English are explained in simple English. These are followed by a fill-in-the-blanks exercise to make sure that students understand the words and can use them in context. Understanding is crucial to language acquisition.

Scanning and Skimming

In this section students are asked to scan the reading for specific information, or to skim it for main ideas and other general information.

After Reading

In this section a variety of skill-building and vocabulary-building exercises is introduced: determining the main idea; understanding reading structure; guessing meaning from context; recognizing contextual reference; finding topics and topic sentences; understanding signal terms; making an outline; understanding cause and effect; comparison and contrast; exemplification; classification; understanding parts of speech; understanding antonyms and synonyms, etc. These dynamic skill and vocabulary acquisition exercises ensure that students will develop and acquire the important reading skills and vocabulary needed to make them good readers.

Each unit concludes with discussion questions designed to encourage students to think about, distill, and exchange views about the information they have been presented with throughout the unit.

Following the discussion, the students are sometimes requested to write down answers to the discussion questions, a place for students to reflect in writing on the learning in the unit.

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Foundation 1: Reading Skills, Elementary Level, First Edition

$40.00

Foundations: Reading Skills is a four-level-reading textbook for students of English as a Foreign Language (EFL) who have a basic knowledge of English. It is designed primarily to help students prepare for studying in English–medium academic courses.

Foundations: Reading Skills is comprised of ten thematically-based units, each of which contains two readings. Skill-building and vocabulary-building activities accompany each reading.

An important goal of Foundations: Reading Skills is to help students become confident readers by increasing their vocabulary base and improving their word-comprehension skills. It engages them in the process of reading thoughtfully and encourages them to move beyond merely passive reading. To accomplish this, the book addresses the reading process in a direct manner, and various reading and vocabulary skills are presented as part of that process. The instruction and practice with reading skills help students increase their reading fluency, and equip them with skills they need for academic achievement. Focus on vocabulary-building promotes their language acquisition and academic advancement. Also, the lexical and syntactic content of the readings has been controlled. The tasks are varied, accessible, and engaging, and they provide stimuli for frequent student-teacher and student student

interaction.

Student awareness of reading and thinking processes is further encouraged in many parts of the book by exercises which require students to work in pairs or small groups. In discussions with others, students formulate and articulate their ideas more precisely, and so they acquire new ways of talking and thinking about a text. These activities present opportunities for real-world contact and real-world use of language. Students are asked to write, and then to read each other’s work so they can experience

the connection between reading and writing.

Traditionally reading classes are based on one of two approaches: in one approach, class time is primarily spent with students doing individual reading and exercise-completion; in the other, class time is devoted to group discussions of the reading and exercise-completion. Because both approaches are important, this book integrates them by alternating reading activities with speaking and/or writing activities.

Within each unit, students will not only practice reading, but they will also receive instruction in various skills and strategies incorporated into the reading process.

The basic format of each unit in Foundations: Reading Skills is as follows:

Before Reading

These pre-reading questions serve to introduce the topic of the reading and get students thinking about that topic. Activating prior knowledge allows students to tap into what they already know and then build on that knowledge, and stirs curiosity. The questions allow students to interact with each other.

Vocabulary Preview

A number of key words which are common in everyday and academic English are explained in simple English. These are followed by a fill-in-the-blanks exercise to make sure that students understand the words and can use them in context. Understanding is crucial to language acquisition.

Scanning and Skimming

In this section students are asked to scan the reading for specific information, or to skim it for main ideas and other general information.

After Reading

In this section a variety of skill-building and vocabulary-building exercises is introduced: determining the main idea; understanding reading structure; guessing meaning from context; recognizing contextual reference; finding topics and topic sentences; understanding signal terms; making an outline; understanding cause and effect; comparison and contrast; exemplification; classification; understanding parts of speech; understanding antonyms and synonyms, etc. These dynamic skill and vocabulary acquisition exercises ensure that students will develop and acquire the important reading skills and vocabulary needed to make them good readers.

Each unit concludes with discussion questions designed to encourage students to think about, distill, and exchange views about the information they have been presented with throughout the unit.

Following the discussion, the students are sometimes requested to write down answers to the discussion questions, a place for students to reflect in writing on the learning in the unit.

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Foundation 2: Reading Skills, Intermediate Level, First Edition

Published on 2010
$40.00
Foundations: Reading Skills is a four-level-reading textbook for students of English as a Foreign Language (EFL) who have a basic knowledge of English. It is designed primarily to help students prepare for studying in English–medium academic courses.

Foundations: Reading Skills is comprised of ten thematically-based units, each of which contains two readings. Skill-building and vocabulary-building activities accompany each reading.

An important goal of Foundations: Reading Skills is to help students become confident readers by increasing their vocabulary base and improving their word-comprehension skills. It engages them in the process of reading thoughtfully and encourages them to move beyond merely passive reading. To accomplish this, the book addresses the reading process in a direct manner, and various reading and vocabulary skills are presented as part of that process. The instruction and practice with reading skills help students increase their reading fluency, and equip them with skills they need for academic achievement. Focus on vocabulary-building promotes their language acquisition and academic advancement. Also, the lexical and syntactic content of the readings has been controlled. The tasks are varied, accessible, and engaging, and they provide stimuli for frequent student-teacher and student student

interaction.

Student awareness of reading and thinking processes is further encouraged in many parts of the book by exercises which require students to work in pairs or small groups. In discussions with others, students formulate and articulate their ideas more precisely, and so they acquire new ways of talking and thinking about a text. These activities present opportunities for real-world contact and real-world use of language. Students are asked to write, and then to read each other’s work so they can experience

the connection between reading and writing.

Traditionally reading classes are based on one of two approaches: in one approach, class time is primarily spent with students doing individual reading and exercise-completion; in the other, class time is devoted to group discussions of the reading and exercise-completion. Because both approaches are important, this book integrates them by alternating reading activities with speaking and/or writing activities.

Within each unit, students will not only practice reading, but they will also receive instruction in various skills and strategies incorporated into the reading process.

The basic format of each unit in Foundations: Reading Skills is as follows:

Before Reading

These pre-reading questions serve to introduce the topic of the reading and get students thinking about that topic. Activating prior knowledge allows students to tap into what they already know and then build on that knowledge, and stirs curiosity. The questions allow students to interact with each other.

Vocabulary Preview

A number of key words which are common in everyday and academic English are explained in simple English. These are followed by a fill-in-the-blanks exercise to make sure that students understand the words and can use them in context. Understanding is crucial to language acquisition.

Scanning and Skimming

In this section students are asked to scan the reading for specific information, or to skim it for main ideas and other general information.

After Reading

In this section a variety of skill-building and vocabulary-building exercises is introduced: determining the main idea; understanding reading structure; guessing meaning from context; recognizing contextual reference; finding topics and topic sentences; understanding signal terms; making an outline; understanding cause and effect; comparison and contrast; exemplification; classification; understanding parts of speech; understanding antonyms and synonyms, etc. These dynamic skill and vocabulary acquisition exercises ensure that students will develop and acquire the important reading skills and vocabulary needed to make them good readers.

Each unit concludes with discussion questions designed to encourage students to think about, distill, and exchange views about the information they have been presented with throughout the unit.

Following the discussion, the students are sometimes requested to write down answers to the discussion questions, a place for students to reflect in writing on the learning in the unit.

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Add to Wishlist

Foundation 2: Reading Skills, Intermediate Level, First Edition

$40.00
Foundations: Reading Skills is a four-level-reading textbook for students of English as a Foreign Language (EFL) who have a basic knowledge of English. It is designed primarily to help students prepare for studying in English–medium academic courses.

Foundations: Reading Skills is comprised of ten thematically-based units, each of which contains two readings. Skill-building and vocabulary-building activities accompany each reading.

An important goal of Foundations: Reading Skills is to help students become confident readers by increasing their vocabulary base and improving their word-comprehension skills. It engages them in the process of reading thoughtfully and encourages them to move beyond merely passive reading. To accomplish this, the book addresses the reading process in a direct manner, and various reading and vocabulary skills are presented as part of that process. The instruction and practice with reading skills help students increase their reading fluency, and equip them with skills they need for academic achievement. Focus on vocabulary-building promotes their language acquisition and academic advancement. Also, the lexical and syntactic content of the readings has been controlled. The tasks are varied, accessible, and engaging, and they provide stimuli for frequent student-teacher and student student

interaction.

Student awareness of reading and thinking processes is further encouraged in many parts of the book by exercises which require students to work in pairs or small groups. In discussions with others, students formulate and articulate their ideas more precisely, and so they acquire new ways of talking and thinking about a text. These activities present opportunities for real-world contact and real-world use of language. Students are asked to write, and then to read each other’s work so they can experience

the connection between reading and writing.

Traditionally reading classes are based on one of two approaches: in one approach, class time is primarily spent with students doing individual reading and exercise-completion; in the other, class time is devoted to group discussions of the reading and exercise-completion. Because both approaches are important, this book integrates them by alternating reading activities with speaking and/or writing activities.

Within each unit, students will not only practice reading, but they will also receive instruction in various skills and strategies incorporated into the reading process.

The basic format of each unit in Foundations: Reading Skills is as follows:

Before Reading

These pre-reading questions serve to introduce the topic of the reading and get students thinking about that topic. Activating prior knowledge allows students to tap into what they already know and then build on that knowledge, and stirs curiosity. The questions allow students to interact with each other.

Vocabulary Preview

A number of key words which are common in everyday and academic English are explained in simple English. These are followed by a fill-in-the-blanks exercise to make sure that students understand the words and can use them in context. Understanding is crucial to language acquisition.

Scanning and Skimming

In this section students are asked to scan the reading for specific information, or to skim it for main ideas and other general information.

After Reading

In this section a variety of skill-building and vocabulary-building exercises is introduced: determining the main idea; understanding reading structure; guessing meaning from context; recognizing contextual reference; finding topics and topic sentences; understanding signal terms; making an outline; understanding cause and effect; comparison and contrast; exemplification; classification; understanding parts of speech; understanding antonyms and synonyms, etc. These dynamic skill and vocabulary acquisition exercises ensure that students will develop and acquire the important reading skills and vocabulary needed to make them good readers.

Each unit concludes with discussion questions designed to encourage students to think about, distill, and exchange views about the information they have been presented with throughout the unit.

Following the discussion, the students are sometimes requested to write down answers to the discussion questions, a place for students to reflect in writing on the learning in the unit.

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Foundation 3: Reading Skills, Upper Intermediate Level, First Edition

Published on 2010
$40.00

Foundations: Reading Skills is a four-level-reading textbook for students of English as a Foreign Language (EFL) who have a basic knowledge of English. It is designed primarily to help students prepare for studying in English–medium academic courses.

Foundations: Reading Skills is comprised of ten thematically-based units, each of which contains two readings. Skill-building and vocabulary-building activities accompany each reading.

An important goal of Foundations: Reading Skills is to help students become confident readers by increasing their vocabulary base and improving their word-comprehension skills. It engages them in the process of reading thoughtfully and encourages them to move beyond merely passive reading. To accomplish this, the book addresses the reading process in a direct manner, and various reading and vocabulary skills are presented as part of that process. The instruction and practice with reading skills help students increase their reading fluency, and equip them with skills they need for academic achievement. Focus on vocabulary-building promotes their language acquisition and academic advancement. Also, the lexical and syntactic content of the readings has been controlled. The tasks are varied, accessible, and engaging, and they provide stimuli for frequent student-teacher and student student

interaction.

Student awareness of reading and thinking processes is further encouraged in many parts of the book by exercises which require students to work in pairs or small groups. In discussions with others, students formulate and articulate their ideas more precisely, and so they acquire new ways of talking and thinking about a text. These activities present opportunities for real-world contact and real-world use of language. Students are asked to write, and then to read each other’s work so they can experience

the connection between reading and writing.

Traditionally reading classes are based on one of two approaches: in one approach, class time is primarily spent with students doing individual reading and exercise-completion; in the other, class time is devoted to group discussions of the reading and exercise-completion. Because both approaches are important, this book integrates them by alternating reading activities with speaking and/or writing activities.

Within each unit, students will not only practice reading, but they will also receive instruction in various skills and strategies incorporated into the reading process.

The basic format of each unit in Foundations: Reading Skills is as follows:

Before Reading

These pre-reading questions serve to introduce the topic of the reading and get students thinking about that topic. Activating prior knowledge allows students to tap into what they already know and then build on that knowledge, and stirs curiosity. The questions allow students to interact with each other.

Vocabulary Preview

A number of key words which are common in everyday and academic English are explained in simple English. These are followed by a fill-in-the-blanks exercise to make sure that students understand the words and can use them in context. Understanding is crucial to language acquisition.

Scanning and Skimming

In this section students are asked to scan the reading for specific information, or to skim it for main ideas and other general information.

After Reading

In this section a variety of skill-building and vocabulary-building exercises is introduced: determining the main idea; understanding reading structure; guessing meaning from context; recognizing contextual reference; finding topics and topic sentences; understanding signal terms; making an outline; understanding cause and effect; comparison and contrast; exemplification; classification; understanding parts of speech; understanding antonyms and synonyms, etc. These dynamic skill and vocabulary acquisition exercises ensure that students will develop and acquire the important reading skills and vocabulary needed to make them good readers.

Each unit concludes with discussion questions designed to encourage students to think about, distill, and exchange views about the information they have been presented with throughout the unit.

Following the discussion, the students are sometimes requested to write down answers to the discussion questions, a place for students to reflect in writing on the learning in the unit.

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Foundation 3: Reading Skills, Upper Intermediate Level, First Edition

$40.00

Foundations: Reading Skills is a four-level-reading textbook for students of English as a Foreign Language (EFL) who have a basic knowledge of English. It is designed primarily to help students prepare for studying in English–medium academic courses.

Foundations: Reading Skills is comprised of ten thematically-based units, each of which contains two readings. Skill-building and vocabulary-building activities accompany each reading.

An important goal of Foundations: Reading Skills is to help students become confident readers by increasing their vocabulary base and improving their word-comprehension skills. It engages them in the process of reading thoughtfully and encourages them to move beyond merely passive reading. To accomplish this, the book addresses the reading process in a direct manner, and various reading and vocabulary skills are presented as part of that process. The instruction and practice with reading skills help students increase their reading fluency, and equip them with skills they need for academic achievement. Focus on vocabulary-building promotes their language acquisition and academic advancement. Also, the lexical and syntactic content of the readings has been controlled. The tasks are varied, accessible, and engaging, and they provide stimuli for frequent student-teacher and student student

interaction.

Student awareness of reading and thinking processes is further encouraged in many parts of the book by exercises which require students to work in pairs or small groups. In discussions with others, students formulate and articulate their ideas more precisely, and so they acquire new ways of talking and thinking about a text. These activities present opportunities for real-world contact and real-world use of language. Students are asked to write, and then to read each other’s work so they can experience

the connection between reading and writing.

Traditionally reading classes are based on one of two approaches: in one approach, class time is primarily spent with students doing individual reading and exercise-completion; in the other, class time is devoted to group discussions of the reading and exercise-completion. Because both approaches are important, this book integrates them by alternating reading activities with speaking and/or writing activities.

Within each unit, students will not only practice reading, but they will also receive instruction in various skills and strategies incorporated into the reading process.

The basic format of each unit in Foundations: Reading Skills is as follows:

Before Reading

These pre-reading questions serve to introduce the topic of the reading and get students thinking about that topic. Activating prior knowledge allows students to tap into what they already know and then build on that knowledge, and stirs curiosity. The questions allow students to interact with each other.

Vocabulary Preview

A number of key words which are common in everyday and academic English are explained in simple English. These are followed by a fill-in-the-blanks exercise to make sure that students understand the words and can use them in context. Understanding is crucial to language acquisition.

Scanning and Skimming

In this section students are asked to scan the reading for specific information, or to skim it for main ideas and other general information.

After Reading

In this section a variety of skill-building and vocabulary-building exercises is introduced: determining the main idea; understanding reading structure; guessing meaning from context; recognizing contextual reference; finding topics and topic sentences; understanding signal terms; making an outline; understanding cause and effect; comparison and contrast; exemplification; classification; understanding parts of speech; understanding antonyms and synonyms, etc. These dynamic skill and vocabulary acquisition exercises ensure that students will develop and acquire the important reading skills and vocabulary needed to make them good readers.

Each unit concludes with discussion questions designed to encourage students to think about, distill, and exchange views about the information they have been presented with throughout the unit.

Following the discussion, the students are sometimes requested to write down answers to the discussion questions, a place for students to reflect in writing on the learning in the unit.

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Foundation Access – Integrated Skills, High Begining

Published on 2009
$40.00

Welcome to the second edition of FOUNDATION, INTEGRATED SKILLS. This new edition is the product of ongoing revision and evaluation, not only by myself, but also by the many instructors who, along with their students, have used the previous edition and have contributed valuable suggestions and comments. The success of the previous edition has been due, in large measure, to the honest and careful appraisal given by instructors and their students.

            FOUNDATION, INTEGRATED SKILLS, is a theme-based, two-level, EFL series designed to prepare students for university-level academic content. The series combines communicative activities with skill-based exercises in listening, speaking, reading, writing, and grammar in order to facilitate academic success. It focuses on the real needs of Arab students intending to go to university, and prepares them to enter university courses after the completion of this series.

            FOUNDATION, INTEGRATED SKILLS, is made up of eight thematically-based units. Each unit consists of listening, speaking, reading, writing, and grammar activities and explanations.

            The Before Listening, Listening, and After Listening sections activate students’ prior knowledge, guide them to listen for main ideas and specific information, and increase their understanding through comprehension questions and vocabulary recycling.  Various task-based practice exercises reinforce their listening comprehension.

            The speaking activities develop naturally from listening, reading, and grammar exercises and take various forms: comprehension questions answered orally in complete sentences; vocabulary reviews that reinforce understanding and improve learner ability to communicate with the new vocabulary and so on; talking about pictures; and authentic speaking opportunities in a variety of formats such as interviews, surveys, scenarios.  All these speaking activities aim at enhancing students’ fluency, building confidence by linking understanding to production, and improving overall ability to communicate effectively.

            The Vocabulary Preview introduces the students to new vocabulary appearing in the listening and reading sections. The listening sections increase student listening comprehension through task-based practice. Pictures provide valuable context for each topic.

The  Before Reading, Reading, and After Reading sections provide scaffolding to help students build to understanding authentic language and identifying main ideas, while reinforcing said understanding through comprehension questions.  Language-learning strategies such as making reasonable guesses about vocabulary and understanding pronoun reference provide students with reading comprehension tools.  Students also have the opportunity to generate language in a semi-controlled format, with discussion and writing exercises encouraging students to contribute their own opinions on subjects of student interest related to the various unit topics.

            The Grammar section contains explanations and charts, which provide clear, easy-to-understand, and visually-appealing grammar presentations.  The exercises in this section give students controlled practice of specific grammatical points, as well as some freer practice with more communicative exercises.

            Writing exercises develop naturally from the listening, speaking, reading, and grammar sections. They are in the form of guided writing practice.w

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Foundation Access – Integrated Skills, High Begining

$40.00

Welcome to the second edition of FOUNDATION, INTEGRATED SKILLS. This new edition is the product of ongoing revision and evaluation, not only by myself, but also by the many instructors who, along with their students, have used the previous edition and have contributed valuable suggestions and comments. The success of the previous edition has been due, in large measure, to the honest and careful appraisal given by instructors and their students.

            FOUNDATION, INTEGRATED SKILLS, is a theme-based, two-level, EFL series designed to prepare students for university-level academic content. The series combines communicative activities with skill-based exercises in listening, speaking, reading, writing, and grammar in order to facilitate academic success. It focuses on the real needs of Arab students intending to go to university, and prepares them to enter university courses after the completion of this series.

            FOUNDATION, INTEGRATED SKILLS, is made up of eight thematically-based units. Each unit consists of listening, speaking, reading, writing, and grammar activities and explanations.

            The Before Listening, Listening, and After Listening sections activate students’ prior knowledge, guide them to listen for main ideas and specific information, and increase their understanding through comprehension questions and vocabulary recycling.  Various task-based practice exercises reinforce their listening comprehension.

            The speaking activities develop naturally from listening, reading, and grammar exercises and take various forms: comprehension questions answered orally in complete sentences; vocabulary reviews that reinforce understanding and improve learner ability to communicate with the new vocabulary and so on; talking about pictures; and authentic speaking opportunities in a variety of formats such as interviews, surveys, scenarios.  All these speaking activities aim at enhancing students’ fluency, building confidence by linking understanding to production, and improving overall ability to communicate effectively.

            The Vocabulary Preview introduces the students to new vocabulary appearing in the listening and reading sections. The listening sections increase student listening comprehension through task-based practice. Pictures provide valuable context for each topic.

The  Before Reading, Reading, and After Reading sections provide scaffolding to help students build to understanding authentic language and identifying main ideas, while reinforcing said understanding through comprehension questions.  Language-learning strategies such as making reasonable guesses about vocabulary and understanding pronoun reference provide students with reading comprehension tools.  Students also have the opportunity to generate language in a semi-controlled format, with discussion and writing exercises encouraging students to contribute their own opinions on subjects of student interest related to the various unit topics.

            The Grammar section contains explanations and charts, which provide clear, easy-to-understand, and visually-appealing grammar presentations.  The exercises in this section give students controlled practice of specific grammatical points, as well as some freer practice with more communicative exercises.

            Writing exercises develop naturally from the listening, speaking, reading, and grammar sections. They are in the form of guided writing practice.w

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Foundation: Beginners

Published on 2013
$40.00
Welcome to the first edition of Foundations: Beginners. This series is designed to be a bridge to bring students up to an ability level appropriate to starting an elementary-level general English course. It addresses the weaknesses and needs of beginners and other learners through a thorough review of basic grammar, functions, and vocabulary in order to enable correct and appropriate use of words, phrases, and then sentences. To achieve this purpose, the book is rich in pictures and illustrations, with clear presentations of new items in each section of the unit as well as starting exercises with examples that show students how to do exercises. The book has ten units, each divided into four sections, and each section has its own purpose. The Grammar sections introduce new grammatical items and explanations. The Functions sections introduce the uses of grammatical items. The Vocabulary sections present and explain the use of new vocabulary. The Reading sections are comprised of natural conversations that show the use of grammar and vocabulary of the unit.  

We hope that you will enjoy using this book, and through it become better, more confident learners of English.

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Foundation: Beginners

$40.00
Welcome to the first edition of Foundations: Beginners. This series is designed to be a bridge to bring students up to an ability level appropriate to starting an elementary-level general English course. It addresses the weaknesses and needs of beginners and other learners through a thorough review of basic grammar, functions, and vocabulary in order to enable correct and appropriate use of words, phrases, and then sentences. To achieve this purpose, the book is rich in pictures and illustrations, with clear presentations of new items in each section of the unit as well as starting exercises with examples that show students how to do exercises. The book has ten units, each divided into four sections, and each section has its own purpose. The Grammar sections introduce new grammatical items and explanations. The Functions sections introduce the uses of grammatical items. The Vocabulary sections present and explain the use of new vocabulary. The Reading sections are comprised of natural conversations that show the use of grammar and vocabulary of the unit.  

We hope that you will enjoy using this book, and through it become better, more confident learners of English.

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Foundations English Grammar 2

Published on 2011
$40.00
Foundations: Grammar 2 is a developmental skills book for students of English as a foreign language. It presents fundamental structures and vocabulary appropriate for intermediate level students and provide opportunities for practice through extensive and varied exercises. while focusing on grammar, the book actively promotes the development of writing and speaking skills (and by extension reading skills) as well as situationally appropriate language use in everyday life.
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Foundations English Grammar 2

$40.00
Foundations: Grammar 2 is a developmental skills book for students of English as a foreign language. It presents fundamental structures and vocabulary appropriate for intermediate level students and provide opportunities for practice through extensive and varied exercises. while focusing on grammar, the book actively promotes the development of writing and speaking skills (and by extension reading skills) as well as situationally appropriate language use in everyday life.
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Foundations Grammar 1.

Published on 2011
$40.00
  Level             Foundations: Grammar 1 is designed to meet the needs of lower-level- EFL classes. While the introduction of structures and vocabulary is directed toward the elementary-level students in the first part of the book, it also can be used with lower-intermediate students as a quick review and expansion of structure usage.             Foundations: Grammar 1 is the first in a series of three EFL grammar books. The second in the series is Foundations: Grammar 2, which is directed toward lower-intermediate and intermediate students. The third one is for upper intermediate through advanced students.   Presentation of Grammar Each unit is organized around a group of related structures and usages. The book is designed to be taught in the order in which it is presented; structures and vocabulary in earlier units serve as the basis for material in later units. However, if your class is lower-intermediate rather than beginning/elementary, you may wish to change the order of presentation somewhat to suit the needs of your students and your purposes.   Grammar receiving major emphasis is presented in charts consisting of examples accompanied by explanations. The examples are designed to be almost self-explanatory. The explanations are simplified as much as possible, with a minimum of terminology. Still, the students may not be able to grasp some parts of the charts by themselves at first. The charts are designed to be used as a springboard in class. You may wish to discuss your own examples drawn from the immediate classroom context and relate them to the examples in the book as preparation for usage exercises. At times you may wish to delve into a usage exercise immediately, discuss form and meaning during the course of the exercise, and then return to a chart for the purpose of making certain generalizations.   The grammar charts serve various functions for various students. Some students devour the charts, while others pay little or no mind, depending upon their learning strategies. Some students need to gain initial understanding from the charts before risking use, while others freely risk anything during usage exercises and refer to the charts only incidentally. In any case, the charts are not intended to be “learned” as an out-of-class homework assignment. A chart is only a starting point and a later reference source.   Vocabulary Vocabulary development is an integral part of the development of structure usage ability. Vocabulary is introduced and reinforced regularly. At times you will find it necessary to spend time in class discussing new vocabulary during exercises. The introduction of vocabulary is controlled so that it can easily be handled in the classroom and so that students should not have to spend a great deal of time at home looking up words in their dictionaries. Some exercises are specifically designed to enhance vocabulary acquisition while the students are practicing structure usage. For this reason, many exercises are accompanied by pictures/illustration to facilitate teaching/learning vocabulary.   Exercises The objective of the exercises is to get students talking about themselves – their activities, their ideas, their environment – as soon as possible, using the target structures. In general, the exercises in any given unit move from ones that focus almost entirely on manipulation of form and meaning to ones that demand more independent usage and involve a combination of skills.   Most of the exercises, those other than the oral exercises, are intended for out-of-class preparation and then in-class use. Typically, a teacher might discuss the grammar in a chart, have the students do the first two or three entries of an exercise in class, and then assign the rest of the exercise to be prepared for the next class. Usually students benefit more from preparing exercises at home than they do from going through exercises “cold” in class. Exercises that the students have prepared at home take less class time to discuss and lead to more fruitful discussion.  
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Foundations Grammar 1.

$40.00
  Level             Foundations: Grammar 1 is designed to meet the needs of lower-level- EFL classes. While the introduction of structures and vocabulary is directed toward the elementary-level students in the first part of the book, it also can be used with lower-intermediate students as a quick review and expansion of structure usage.             Foundations: Grammar 1 is the first in a series of three EFL grammar books. The second in the series is Foundations: Grammar 2, which is directed toward lower-intermediate and intermediate students. The third one is for upper intermediate through advanced students.   Presentation of Grammar Each unit is organized around a group of related structures and usages. The book is designed to be taught in the order in which it is presented; structures and vocabulary in earlier units serve as the basis for material in later units. However, if your class is lower-intermediate rather than beginning/elementary, you may wish to change the order of presentation somewhat to suit the needs of your students and your purposes.   Grammar receiving major emphasis is presented in charts consisting of examples accompanied by explanations. The examples are designed to be almost self-explanatory. The explanations are simplified as much as possible, with a minimum of terminology. Still, the students may not be able to grasp some parts of the charts by themselves at first. The charts are designed to be used as a springboard in class. You may wish to discuss your own examples drawn from the immediate classroom context and relate them to the examples in the book as preparation for usage exercises. At times you may wish to delve into a usage exercise immediately, discuss form and meaning during the course of the exercise, and then return to a chart for the purpose of making certain generalizations.   The grammar charts serve various functions for various students. Some students devour the charts, while others pay little or no mind, depending upon their learning strategies. Some students need to gain initial understanding from the charts before risking use, while others freely risk anything during usage exercises and refer to the charts only incidentally. In any case, the charts are not intended to be “learned” as an out-of-class homework assignment. A chart is only a starting point and a later reference source.   Vocabulary Vocabulary development is an integral part of the development of structure usage ability. Vocabulary is introduced and reinforced regularly. At times you will find it necessary to spend time in class discussing new vocabulary during exercises. The introduction of vocabulary is controlled so that it can easily be handled in the classroom and so that students should not have to spend a great deal of time at home looking up words in their dictionaries. Some exercises are specifically designed to enhance vocabulary acquisition while the students are practicing structure usage. For this reason, many exercises are accompanied by pictures/illustration to facilitate teaching/learning vocabulary.   Exercises The objective of the exercises is to get students talking about themselves – their activities, their ideas, their environment – as soon as possible, using the target structures. In general, the exercises in any given unit move from ones that focus almost entirely on manipulation of form and meaning to ones that demand more independent usage and involve a combination of skills.   Most of the exercises, those other than the oral exercises, are intended for out-of-class preparation and then in-class use. Typically, a teacher might discuss the grammar in a chart, have the students do the first two or three entries of an exercise in class, and then assign the rest of the exercise to be prepared for the next class. Usually students benefit more from preparing exercises at home than they do from going through exercises “cold” in class. Exercises that the students have prepared at home take less class time to discuss and lead to more fruitful discussion.  
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Foundations Writing Skills 2 Intermediate Level

Published on 2011
$40.00

FOUNDATIONS WRITING SKILLS is a two-level, self-contained course in writing English aimed at elementary and intermediate level Arab students. The course guides students step-by-step towards writing simple and accurate paragraphs, paying close attention to sentence structure, vocabulary, grammar and mechanics, guided paragraph writing and the process of writing.

Continuous graded practice is provided through a variety of exercise types such as reading comprehension, gap-fill, table completion, the correction of passages and the writing of sentences and paragraphs using pictures and tabular information. All exercises are based on realistic topics and content and language functions, useful in real life situations. Places from various Arab countries are commonly mentioned, but the locale should be unimportant for the comprehension of the model compositions, and students will substitute their own environments in their writing.

The book is divided into ten units. Each unit is subdivided into six sections: model composition, vocabulary, grammar and mechanics, sentence-joining, guided paragraphs, and the process of writing.

All model compositions focus on certain purposes for writing, such as narrating and describing, and certain means of organizing ideas such as chronological and spatial ordering. The assumptions here are that even on an elementary level there is more to composing than mere sentence-level exercises and that English learners can understand and use sophisticated principles and techniques of English

compositions writing without waiting until they are more fully fluent in English.

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Foundations Writing Skills 2 Intermediate Level

$40.00

FOUNDATIONS WRITING SKILLS is a two-level, self-contained course in writing English aimed at elementary and intermediate level Arab students. The course guides students step-by-step towards writing simple and accurate paragraphs, paying close attention to sentence structure, vocabulary, grammar and mechanics, guided paragraph writing and the process of writing.

Continuous graded practice is provided through a variety of exercise types such as reading comprehension, gap-fill, table completion, the correction of passages and the writing of sentences and paragraphs using pictures and tabular information. All exercises are based on realistic topics and content and language functions, useful in real life situations. Places from various Arab countries are commonly mentioned, but the locale should be unimportant for the comprehension of the model compositions, and students will substitute their own environments in their writing.

The book is divided into ten units. Each unit is subdivided into six sections: model composition, vocabulary, grammar and mechanics, sentence-joining, guided paragraphs, and the process of writing.

All model compositions focus on certain purposes for writing, such as narrating and describing, and certain means of organizing ideas such as chronological and spatial ordering. The assumptions here are that even on an elementary level there is more to composing than mere sentence-level exercises and that English learners can understand and use sophisticated principles and techniques of English

compositions writing without waiting until they are more fully fluent in English.

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Foundations: Writng Skills 1, Elementary Level

Published on 2011
$40.00

FOUNDATIONS WRITING SKILLS is a two-level, self-contained course in writing English aimed at elementary and intermediate level Arab students. The course guides students step-by-step towards writing simple and accurate paragraphs, paying close attention to sentence structure, vocabulary, grammar and mechanics, guided paragraph writing and the process of writing.

Continuous graded practice is provided through a variety of exercise types such as reading comprehension, gap-fill, table completion, the correction of passages and the writing of sentences and paragraphs using pictures and tabular information. All exercises are based on realistic topics and content and language functions, useful in real life situations. Places from various Arab countries are commonly mentioned, but the locale should be unimportant for the comprehension of the model compositions, and students will substitute their own environments in their writing.

The book is divided into ten units. Each unit is subdivided into six sections: model composition, vocabulary, grammar and mechanics, sentence-joining, guided paragraphs, and the process of writing.

All model compositions focus on certain purposes for writing, such as narrating and describing, and certain means of organizing ideas such as chronological and spatial ordering. The assumptions here are that even on an elementary level there is more to composing than mere sentence-level exercises and that English learners can understand and use sophisticated principles and techniques of English compositions writing without waiting until they are more fully fluent in English

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Foundations: Writng Skills 1, Elementary Level

$40.00

FOUNDATIONS WRITING SKILLS is a two-level, self-contained course in writing English aimed at elementary and intermediate level Arab students. The course guides students step-by-step towards writing simple and accurate paragraphs, paying close attention to sentence structure, vocabulary, grammar and mechanics, guided paragraph writing and the process of writing.

Continuous graded practice is provided through a variety of exercise types such as reading comprehension, gap-fill, table completion, the correction of passages and the writing of sentences and paragraphs using pictures and tabular information. All exercises are based on realistic topics and content and language functions, useful in real life situations. Places from various Arab countries are commonly mentioned, but the locale should be unimportant for the comprehension of the model compositions, and students will substitute their own environments in their writing.

The book is divided into ten units. Each unit is subdivided into six sections: model composition, vocabulary, grammar and mechanics, sentence-joining, guided paragraphs, and the process of writing.

All model compositions focus on certain purposes for writing, such as narrating and describing, and certain means of organizing ideas such as chronological and spatial ordering. The assumptions here are that even on an elementary level there is more to composing than mere sentence-level exercises and that English learners can understand and use sophisticated principles and techniques of English compositions writing without waiting until they are more fully fluent in English</