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Academic Writing for Health Professions, Elementary Level. Third Edition

$40.00
PREFACE Welcome to the third edition to Academic Writing for Health Professions: Elementary Level! This new edition is the product of extensive revision and evaluation, not only by myself and my students, but by the many instructors who, along with their students, have used the previous edition and have contributed valuable suggestions and comments. The success of the previous edition has been due, in large measure, to the honest and careful appraisal given by language instructors and their students. Academic Writing for Health Professions: Elementary Level is designed for university students or professionals who are studying English as a Foreign Language (EFL) at an elementary level. The underlying philosophy of the book is the author’s conviction that basic organizational skills and modes of communication need to be taught at a very early stage to all students, regardless of whether they are native or non-native speakers of a language. Putting off this crucial concept until grammatical mastery has been achieved results, in my view, in the acquiring of a narrow focus on language which becomes difficult to rectify later in students’ careers, when they are expected to produce samples of extended writing that communicate coherently. To this end, the text adopts from the first an approach to meaningful writing using step-by-step explanations and exercises that guide the student towards the desired goal. This is done using six practical and academic writing purposes: Giving Instructions, Telling What Happened, Classifying, Explaining Cause and Effect, Comparing and Contrasting, and Describing a Mechanism or a Process. The text is designed so that the six writing purposes and the general content of the units gradually increase in complexity. While some degree of control is of course essential in any teaching situation, a conscious attempt has been made to allow also for student creativity and individuality. This is done by beginning each unit with clear examples and controlled exercises to learn specific organization and grammar skills. By the second part of each unit, the control gives way to looser guidance. Students use the skills they have learned to plan and write compositions that move from carefully guided to unguided. A typical unit opens with Objectives and a short Introduction discussing the writing purpose and pointing out its academic and practical use. This is followed by several Writing Tips for addressing the rhetorical purpose in question. Next comes a section on Planning (in the form of an outline, an idea map, informal notes, a chart, or an information table), followed by an Example Composition illustrating in clear and simple language the unit’s rhetorical purpose. The topics are designed to be diverse, relevant, and interesting to EFL students undertaking medical courses: How to control external bleeding, sun stroke, hot compresses, causes of fainting, comparing and contrasting measles and rubella, how the respiratory system works, and so on. A section on Functional Skills gives practice on logical relationships and other concepts related to the unit’s rhetorical purpose. This is followed by Organization Skills, which require students to actively work with introductions, main idea sentences, transitions, and conclusions, all of which are introduced in a simple and structured manner. After that, the Grammar Skills and Punctuation Skills segments treat the grammatical structures and punctuation relevant to the writing purpose in question, and opportunities for controlled and freer practice are given. At the end of each unit, a Guided Writing section provides students with an opportunity to consolidate what they have learned. Their writing is controlled by picture cues or information tables, and the guided composition is similar to the example composition in vocabulary and organizational principles. CONTENTS Unit 1 Giving Instructions Unit 2 Telling What Happened: Unit 3 Classifying Unit 4 Explaining Cause and Effect Unit 5 Comparing and Contrasting Unit 6 Describing a Mechanism or a Process
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Academic Writing for Health Professions, Elementary Level. Third Edition

$40.00
PREFACE Welcome to the third edition to Academic Writing for Health Professions: Elementary Level! This new edition is the product of extensive revision and evaluation, not only by myself and my students, but by the many instructors who, along with their students, have used the previous edition and have contributed valuable suggestions and comments. The success of the previous edition has been due, in large measure, to the honest and careful appraisal given by language instructors and their students. Academic Writing for Health Professions: Elementary Level is designed for university students or professionals who are studying English as a Foreign Language (EFL) at an elementary level. The underlying philosophy of the book is the author’s conviction that basic organizational skills and modes of communication need to be taught at a very early stage to all students, regardless of whether they are native or non-native speakers of a language. Putting off this crucial concept until grammatical mastery has been achieved results, in my view, in the acquiring of a narrow focus on language which becomes difficult to rectify later in students’ careers, when they are expected to produce samples of extended writing that communicate coherently. To this end, the text adopts from the first an approach to meaningful writing using step-by-step explanations and exercises that guide the student towards the desired goal. This is done using six practical and academic writing purposes: Giving Instructions, Telling What Happened, Classifying, Explaining Cause and Effect, Comparing and Contrasting, and Describing a Mechanism or a Process. The text is designed so that the six writing purposes and the general content of the units gradually increase in complexity. While some degree of control is of course essential in any teaching situation, a conscious attempt has been made to allow also for student creativity and individuality. This is done by beginning each unit with clear examples and controlled exercises to learn specific organization and grammar skills. By the second part of each unit, the control gives way to looser guidance. Students use the skills they have learned to plan and write compositions that move from carefully guided to unguided. A typical unit opens with Objectives and a short Introduction discussing the writing purpose and pointing out its academic and practical use. This is followed by several Writing Tips for addressing the rhetorical purpose in question. Next comes a section on Planning (in the form of an outline, an idea map, informal notes, a chart, or an information table), followed by an Example Composition illustrating in clear and simple language the unit’s rhetorical purpose. The topics are designed to be diverse, relevant, and interesting to EFL students undertaking medical courses: How to control external bleeding, sun stroke, hot compresses, causes of fainting, comparing and contrasting measles and rubella, how the respiratory system works, and so on. A section on Functional Skills gives practice on logical relationships and other concepts related to the unit’s rhetorical purpose. This is followed by Organization Skills, which require students to actively work with introductions, main idea sentences, transitions, and conclusions, all of which are introduced in a simple and structured manner. After that, the Grammar Skills and Punctuation Skills segments treat the grammatical structures and punctuation relevant to the writing purpose in question, and opportunities for controlled and freer practice are given. At the end of each unit, a Guided Writing section provides students with an opportunity to consolidate what they have learned. Their writing is controlled by picture cues or information tables, and the guided composition is similar to the example composition in vocabulary and organizational principles. CONTENTS Unit 1 Giving Instructions Unit 2 Telling What Happened: Unit 3 Classifying Unit 4 Explaining Cause and Effect Unit 5 Comparing and Contrasting Unit 6 Describing a Mechanism or a Process
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English for Health Sciences, Reading Skills. Intermediate Level. Third Edition

Published on 2020
$40.00

English for Health Sciences: Reading Skills, Intermediate Level! This new edition has undergone major improvements and is the product of constant revision and evaluation, not only by myself and my students, but by the many instructors who, along with their students, have used the previous edition and have contributed valuable suggestions and comments. The success of the previous edition has been due, in large measure, to the honest and careful appraisal given by language instructors and their students.

English for Health Sciences: Reading Skills, Intermediate Level is an English language text constructed for use in health colleges and institutes and adult English Language training programmes. The aim of the series is to prepare students to participate in health science courses. This text is structured at the intermediate level of students of English as a Foreign Language (EFL). It focuses on reading skills with the aim of facilitating the leap from basic English to academic English and preparing students to handle health science materials with confidence.

Unit Organization

English for Health Sciences: Reading Skills, Intermediate Level is made up of twelve units and four progress tests. To do the tests, the student has to login on to www.professorsuleimanmazyad.com using his/her username and password

which he/she can create using the code that appears on the back cover of the

book. Because the book’s primary purpose is to develop one’s reading ability, it offers a large variety of exercises and activities directed at reading. Each unit consists of a brief pre-reading exercise, vocabulary preview, and an exercise on skimming or scanning. Following the reading passage itself, there are post-reading exercises that focus on important reading skills: comprehension skills, getting the main idea, understanding the reading structure, understanding meaning from context, recognizing contextual reference, finding the topic and topic sentence, understanding general and specific ideas, summarizing, understanding signal words, making an outline, understanding cause and effect, comparison and contrast, classification, inference, exemplification, understanding stems and affixes, using a dictionary, increasing one’s reading speed, etc.

Each unit concludes with a discussion question designed to encourage students to think about, distill, and discuss the information they have read about throughout the unit. Sometimes the discussion deals with a topic from outside the reading.

The topics have been selected from a wide range of authentic writings including health science curriculum items as well as medical journals and textbooks to serve as vehicles for developing reading with its associated skills in an interesting and informative way.

An important goal of English for Health Sciences is to help health-science

students to become confident readers by increasing their vocabulary base

and improving their reading skills. It engages them in the process of reading

thoughtfully and encourages them to move beyond passive reading.

To the Teacher

Having some idea of the subject matter is clearly an important aspect of active

reading. To this end, students need to be encouraged to look at and discuss

the pictures in the Before Reading and Discussion Questions sections, and

to attempt to answer the accompanying questions. Answering in complete

sentences is best.

When tackling the reading selections themselves, students should read silently.

This speeds up their reading and also closely parallels the established approach

to the reading of academic texts. Encouraging the students to “unhinge” their

minds from their lips – i.e., not to pronounce words as they read – is an additional

means of increasing their reading speed. Not allowing them a dictionary for

the initial reading will force them to extract the meanings of words from their

context in the passage itself. Stress the importance of homing in on the central

idea of the text.

As an alternative to this approach, you may occasionally wish to read out a

passage (or play a recording of it) while the students follow it in their books.

Whichever approach is used, the passage should be read through in full and

without explanations.

The readings are followed by a variety of exercises in the After Reading section.

These are intended to help students to consolidate, in English, the very same

skills they are assumed to possess in their own language. Again, the emphasis

is on grasping the main idea and guessing meaning from context – a sometimes

bewildering but ultimately rewarding experience for those students who have

developed a slavish reliance on their dictionaries. They need to learn that trying

to find out the exact meaning of a word is not always necessary and can even be

counter-productive if the word has subtly acquired a different shade of meaning

in a new context.

Although students are instructed to re-read the selection after doing the Guessing

Meaning from Context exercises, towards the end of the book you might wish

to consider having them mark the passage after reading it just once – an approach

commonly followed in courses in tertiary education, where the sheer volume of

reading to be done often limits a student to no more than a single reading of a

chapter. Should you decide on more than one reading, restrict dictionary usage

to an absolute minimum, often as a last resort.

In the Getting the Main Idea sections, students practise finding the topic

sentence of a paragraph.

The Building Vocabulary exercises can be assigned as homework, but the

Study Skills activities should be completed in class, particularly those dealing

with increasing reading speed.

Students are given free rein in practising newly-acquired vocabulary when

they express their opinion in the Discussing the Reading section. This may be

handled in a number of ways. For example:

  1. The teacher asks questions of the entire class. The advantage of this

approach is teacher-control of the discussion – to direct and add to it. A

common problem arises with an unresponsive group of students who

may be too self-conscious to speak out.

  1. The students discuss answers in small groups. A representative of each

group then reports the group’s findings to the entire class. For very

shy students, pairs of students may be preferable.

  1. One selected question is chosen for a debate. The class is then divided

into two teams who prepare points for their team.

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English for Health Sciences, Reading Skills. Intermediate Level. Third Edition

$40.00

English for Health Sciences: Reading Skills, Intermediate Level! This new edition has undergone major improvements and is the product of constant revision and evaluation, not only by myself and my students, but by the many instructors who, along with their students, have used the previous edition and have contributed valuable suggestions and comments. The success of the previous edition has been due, in large measure, to the honest and careful appraisal given by language instructors and their students.

English for Health Sciences: Reading Skills, Intermediate Level is an English language text constructed for use in health colleges and institutes and adult English Language training programmes. The aim of the series is to prepare students to participate in health science courses. This text is structured at the intermediate level of students of English as a Foreign Language (EFL). It focuses on reading skills with the aim of facilitating the leap from basic English to academic English and preparing students to handle health science materials with confidence.

Unit Organization

English for Health Sciences: Reading Skills, Intermediate Level is made up of twelve units and four progress tests. To do the tests, the student has to login on to www.professorsuleimanmazyad.com using his/her username and password

which he/she can create using the code that appears on the back cover of the

book. Because the book’s primary purpose is to develop one’s reading ability, it offers a large variety of exercises and activities directed at reading. Each unit consists of a brief pre-reading exercise, vocabulary preview, and an exercise on skimming or scanning. Following the reading passage itself, there are post-reading exercises that focus on important reading skills: comprehension skills, getting the main idea, understanding the reading structure, understanding meaning from context, recognizing contextual reference, finding the topic and topic sentence, understanding general and specific ideas, summarizing, understanding signal words, making an outline, understanding cause and effect, comparison and contrast, classification, inference, exemplification, understanding stems and affixes, using a dictionary, increasing one’s reading speed, etc.

Each unit concludes with a discussion question designed to encourage students to think about, distill, and discuss the information they have read about throughout the unit. Sometimes the discussion deals with a topic from outside the reading.

The topics have been selected from a wide range of authentic writings including health science curriculum items as well as medical journals and textbooks to serve as vehicles for developing reading with its associated skills in an interesting and informative way.

An important goal of English for Health Sciences is to help health-science

students to become confident readers by increasing their vocabulary base

and improving their reading skills. It engages them in the process of reading

thoughtfully and encourages them to move beyond passive reading.

To the Teacher

Having some idea of the subject matter is clearly an important aspect of active

reading. To this end, students need to be encouraged to look at and discuss

the pictures in the Before Reading and Discussion Questions sections, and

to attempt to answer the accompanying questions. Answering in complete

sentences is best.

When tackling the reading selections themselves, students should read silently.

This speeds up their reading and also closely parallels the established approach

to the reading of academic texts. Encouraging the students to “unhinge” their

minds from their lips – i.e., not to pronounce words as they read – is an additional

means of increasing their reading speed. Not allowing them a dictionary for

the initial reading will force them to extract the meanings of words from their

context in the passage itself. Stress the importance of homing in on the central

idea of the text.

As an alternative to this approach, you may occasionally wish to read out a

passage (or play a recording of it) while the students follow it in their books.

Whichever approach is used, the passage should be read through in full and

without explanations.

The readings are followed by a variety of exercises in the After Reading section.

These are intended to help students to consolidate, in English, the very same

skills they are assumed to possess in their own language. Again, the emphasis

is on grasping the main idea and guessing meaning from context – a sometimes

bewildering but ultimately rewarding experience for those students who have

developed a slavish reliance on their dictionaries. They need to learn that trying

to find out the exact meaning of a word is not always necessary and can even be

counter-productive if the word has subtly acquired a different shade of meaning

in a new context.

Although students are instructed to re-read the selection after doing the Guessing

Meaning from Context exercises, towards the end of the book you might wish

to consider having them mark the passage after reading it just once – an approach

commonly followed in courses in tertiary education, where the sheer volume of

reading to be done often limits a student to no more than a single reading of a

chapter. Should you decide on more than one reading, restrict dictionary usage

to an absolute minimum, often as a last resort.

In the Getting the Main Idea sections, students practise finding the topic

sentence of a paragraph.

The Building Vocabulary exercises can be assigned as homework, but the

Study Skills activities should be completed in class, particularly those dealing

with increasing reading speed.

Students are given free rein in practising newly-acquired vocabulary when

they express their opinion in the Discussing the Reading section. This may be

handled in a number of ways. For example:

  1. The teacher asks questions of the entire class. The advantage of this

approach is teacher-control of the discussion – to direct and add to it. A

common problem arises with an unresponsive group of students who

may be too self-conscious to speak out.

  1. The students discuss answers in small groups. A representative of each

group then reports the group’s findings to the entire class. For very

shy students, pairs of students may be preferable.

  1. One selected question is chosen for a debate. The class is then divided

into two teams who prepare points for their team.

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English For Tourism, Intermediate Level

Published on 2007
$40.00
English For Tourism, Intermediate Level, is the second book in a two-level course especially designed for learners of English as a Foreign language who study tourism and archeology as well as for those interested or working in these fields.             English For Tourism is made up of ten thematically based units, each of which comprises two reading selections.  The first reading relates to tourism, and the second one relates to archeology. This text provides a fresh approach to the intermediate level. It is based on learning through meaningful motivating activities, relevant topics, critical thinking, active reading, speaking, and purposeful writing.             English For Tourism is a comprehensive language course. It covers the language syllabus clearly and thoroughly, giving learners command over form together with extensive fluency practice. The units of the book are divided into a pre-reading orientation activity, an exercise on skimming or scanning,  a reading section, comprehension questions, a section on understanding reference, practice understanding signal words, exercises on guessing meaning from context, and a grammar focus section.  The material is also organized to provide constant recycling and expansion of knowledge about the language and its use.             English For Tourism offers teachers and students several special features which make it an outstanding course book:
  • A modern approach to the teaching of reading in terms of both content and skills.
  • A wide variety of reading texts taken from authentic tourism and archeology curricula.
  • All language elements (grammar, vocabulary, reading, speaking, and writing skills) developed simultaneously.
  •   A wide variety of vocabulary development exercises to help students understand unfamiliar words and build their own  vocabulary bank.
  •         Grammatical structures are introduced inductively and deductively, accompanied by contextualised practice material.
  • A great variety of rhetorical styles and writing types.
  • Students’ participation and involvement maximized through communicative language activities.
  • Easy to use and teach with clear and straightforward tasks.
  Description of the Course Material Reading Skills The reading material provides the students with a wide variety of topics from authentic tourism and archeology curricula. They are intended to trigger active class discussion, generating functional language while at the same time developing the students’ reading and cognitive skills. Each unit contains two reading selections that focus on important reading skills: getting the main idea, understanding reading structure, identifying paragraph topics, recognizing contextual reference, and making an outline as well as understanding signal words for cause and effect, comparison and contrast, chronological order, examples, classification, etc. The course material offers students a variety of reading comprehension exercises to improve their comprehension and critical thinking. Each unit is introduced through a title page containing the title of the unit, a picture, and a few general questions which can be used in class discussions for topic anticipation and prediction. It also contains a set of comprehension questions varying from multiple choice to short answer questions, true or false exercises, or find the error exercises. Vocabulary Skills The wide variety of vocabulary development exercises is one of the special features of the course.
  1. Guessing Meaning from Context: Students are encouraged to study and learn the vocabulary items explained in the vocabulary preview section and do the vocabulary exercises. They are also encouraged to understand the meaning of unfamiliar words and expressions by looking for context clues. Each unit includes an exercise on guessing meaning from context, which provides practice in context clues skills and highlights the unfamiliar vocabulary used in each unit.
  2. Word Forms: This type of exercises helps students build their vocabulary by learning the functions of prefixes and suffixes as well as word form usage.
  3. Synonyms and Antonyms: These are presented in varied formats and aim at developing students’ vocabulary.
Grammar Skills In this section, grammatical structures are introduced deductively or inductively. In some units, grammatical rules are stated with correct examples of use; in other units, the students study a number of correct examples in order to work out the rules. Ample practice of specific grammatical points as well as holistic linguistic areas are provided in every unit.   Writing Skills Throughout the course material, writing skills are given particular emphasis through recognition of patterns and techniques and production of various kinds of writing patterns. Practice includes  note-taking and outlining and putting words into meaningful sentences, writing accurate sentences. Writing activities are numerous; they range from phrases and short answer responses to complete sentences.   Speaking Skills Speaking skills range from the discussion questions based on the title and the pictures at the beginning of each unit to answering certain exercises orally. In addition, each unit concludes with discussion questions that require students to talk about topics related to the reading.   Language skills and elements, however, are practised and used in an integrated manner - that is, to read, take notes, and speak; or to read, write, and speak, etc. Effort has been made to allow for sensible and natural communication in the classroom environment, as much as possible.
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English For Tourism, Intermediate Level

$40.00
English For Tourism, Intermediate Level, is the second book in a two-level course especially designed for learners of English as a Foreign language who study tourism and archeology as well as for those interested or working in these fields.             English For Tourism is made up of ten thematically based units, each of which comprises two reading selections.  The first reading relates to tourism, and the second one relates to archeology. This text provides a fresh approach to the intermediate level. It is based on learning through meaningful motivating activities, relevant topics, critical thinking, active reading, speaking, and purposeful writing.             English For Tourism is a comprehensive language course. It covers the language syllabus clearly and thoroughly, giving learners command over form together with extensive fluency practice. The units of the book are divided into a pre-reading orientation activity, an exercise on skimming or scanning,  a reading section, comprehension questions, a section on understanding reference, practice understanding signal words, exercises on guessing meaning from context, and a grammar focus section.  The material is also organized to provide constant recycling and expansion of knowledge about the language and its use.             English For Tourism offers teachers and students several special features which make it an outstanding course book:
  • A modern approach to the teaching of reading in terms of both content and skills.
  • A wide variety of reading texts taken from authentic tourism and archeology curricula.
  • All language elements (grammar, vocabulary, reading, speaking, and writing skills) developed simultaneously.
  •   A wide variety of vocabulary development exercises to help students understand unfamiliar words and build their own  vocabulary bank.
  •         Grammatical structures are introduced inductively and deductively, accompanied by contextualised practice material.
  • A great variety of rhetorical styles and writing types.
  • Students’ participation and involvement maximized through communicative language activities.
  • Easy to use and teach with clear and straightforward tasks.
  Description of the Course Material Reading Skills The reading material provides the students with a wide variety of topics from authentic tourism and archeology curricula. They are intended to trigger active class discussion, generating functional language while at the same time developing the students’ reading and cognitive skills. Each unit contains two reading selections that focus on important reading skills: getting the main idea, understanding reading structure, identifying paragraph topics, recognizing contextual reference, and making an outline as well as understanding signal words for cause and effect, comparison and contrast, chronological order, examples, classification, etc. The course material offers students a variety of reading comprehension exercises to improve their comprehension and critical thinking. Each unit is introduced through a title page containing the title of the unit, a picture, and a few general questions which can be used in class discussions for topic anticipation and prediction. It also contains a set of comprehension questions varying from multiple choice to short answer questions, true or false exercises, or find the error exercises. Vocabulary Skills The wide variety of vocabulary development exercises is one of the special features of the course.
  1. Guessing Meaning from Context: Students are encouraged to study and learn the vocabulary items explained in the vocabulary preview section and do the vocabulary exercises. They are also encouraged to understand the meaning of unfamiliar words and expressions by looking for context clues. Each unit includes an exercise on guessing meaning from context, which provides practice in context clues skills and highlights the unfamiliar vocabulary used in each unit.
  2. Word Forms: This type of exercises helps students build their vocabulary by learning the functions of prefixes and suffixes as well as word form usage.
  3. Synonyms and Antonyms: These are presented in varied formats and aim at developing students’ vocabulary.
Grammar Skills In this section, grammatical structures are introduced deductively or inductively. In some units, grammatical rules are stated with correct examples of use; in other units, the students study a number of correct examples in order to work out the rules. Ample practice of specific grammatical points as well as holistic linguistic areas are provided in every unit.   Writing Skills Throughout the course material, writing skills are given particular emphasis through recognition of patterns and techniques and production of various kinds of writing patterns. Practice includes  note-taking and outlining and putting words into meaningful sentences, writing accurate sentences. Writing activities are numerous; they range from phrases and short answer responses to complete sentences.   Speaking Skills Speaking skills range from the discussion questions based on the title and the pictures at the beginning of each unit to answering certain exercises orally. In addition, each unit concludes with discussion questions that require students to talk about topics related to the reading.   Language skills and elements, however, are practised and used in an integrated manner - that is, to read, take notes, and speak; or to read, write, and speak, etc. Effort has been made to allow for sensible and natural communication in the classroom environment, as much as possible.
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Academic Listening for Health Professions, Intermeiate level, Second Edition

Published on 2007
$40.00
Welcome to the second edition of Academic Listening For Health Professions, Intermediate Level. This new edition is the product of constantrevision and evaluation, not by me, but by the many instructors who, along with theirstudents, have used the previous edition and have sent in valuable suggestions andcomments. The success of the previous edition has been due, in large measure, to thehonest and careful appraisal given by instructors and their students. Academic Listening For Health Professions, Intermediate Level is thesecond in a series of English language texts designed for use in health colleges,institutes and adult English-language training programmes. This volume consists of eightunits organized around selected rhetorical functions: general ideas, specificinformation, classification, defining, chronological order, cause and effect,comparing and contrasting, and processes and procedures. The book isaimed at Arab students who are at an intermediate level of English as a ForeignLanguage (EFL). Each unit is graded from listening at sentence level to listening to ashort passage, and aims at developing students’ skills in listening in medical English.Prelistening and postlistening activities are included in each unit. The book isaccompanied by one audio CD. Organization of Units Each of the eight units consists of the following sections:
  • Before Listening
Some questions to discuss orally in order to give learners an idea of the subjectmatter and prepare them for listening.
  • Vocabulary Preview
A list of five to eight vocabulary items that appear undefined in the listening. They arebriefly defined in the preview and are accompanied by sentences with missing words tobe filled in. Brief definitions are sometimes given on the tape, in which case thestudent listens to the talk and then writes a short definition for each item.
  • Listening
The listening passages are read by a variety of native speakers of English. Thevocabulary, structure, content variation, redundancy, and rhetorical style of eachpassage have been carefully chosen and designed.
  • Listening Exercises

A variety of listening exercises that focus on listening skills is related to the rhetorical function being focused on. These include making an outline which is partiallycompleted in order to lay out the rhetorical structure of the talk.

  • After Listening

Written-exercise types on the specific rhetorical function to help the listener reconstruct important information from the talk.

Rationale for the Course Design

Listening to sentence-level material and short passages trains intermediatestudents in listening skills relevant to the rhetorical function under consideration.

Materials are controlled for concept-recycling. Each passage contains a limited number of ideas that the listener retains. Support for these key ideas (that is,recycling) comes in the form of rewordings, examples, clear transition markers,and summarizing.

Because of the graded use of language within the talks, learners acquire theability to process spoken language for increasingly longer spans of time - a highlydesirable target.

In order to ensure a high degree of comprehension and monitoring of passage, a large percentage of content words need to be readily understood. Thetopics chosen for the talks have, therefore, been made as tangible as possible, with thevocabulary kept within an intermediate-level word-frequency range.

Finally, an important skill for students is note-taking, by which they spotthe main points of a talk and write them down in note form. These notes help thelistener to remember the main points of the talk.

Note-taking is an individual activity, so one person may have difficultyunderstanding another person's notes. The activities in this book should help thestudent take down clearer, more concise notes. In further activities, the learner is

often asked to complete the notes.

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Academic Listening for Health Professions, Intermeiate level, Second Edition

$40.00
Welcome to the second edition of Academic Listening For Health Professions, Intermediate Level. This new edition is the product of constantrevision and evaluation, not by me, but by the many instructors who, along with theirstudents, have used the previous edition and have sent in valuable suggestions andcomments. The success of the previous edition has been due, in large measure, to thehonest and careful appraisal given by instructors and their students. Academic Listening For Health Professions, Intermediate Level is thesecond in a series of English language texts designed for use in health colleges,institutes and adult English-language training programmes. This volume consists of eightunits organized around selected rhetorical functions: general ideas, specificinformation, classification, defining, chronological order, cause and effect,comparing and contrasting, and processes and procedures. The book isaimed at Arab students who are at an intermediate level of English as a ForeignLanguage (EFL). Each unit is graded from listening at sentence level to listening to ashort passage, and aims at developing students’ skills in listening in medical English.Prelistening and postlistening activities are included in each unit. The book isaccompanied by one audio CD. Organization of Units Each of the eight units consists of the following sections:
  • Before Listening
Some questions to discuss orally in order to give learners an idea of the subjectmatter and prepare them for listening.
  • Vocabulary Preview
A list of five to eight vocabulary items that appear undefined in the listening. They arebriefly defined in the preview and are accompanied by sentences with missing words tobe filled in. Brief definitions are sometimes given on the tape, in which case thestudent listens to the talk and then writes a short definition for each item.
  • Listening
The listening passages are read by a variety of native speakers of English. Thevocabulary, structure, content variation, redundancy, and rhetorical style of eachpassage have been carefully chosen and designed.
  • Listening Exercises

A variety of listening exercises that focus on listening skills is related to the rhetorical function being focused on. These include making an outline which is partiallycompleted in order to lay out the rhetorical structure of the talk.

  • After Listening

Written-exercise types on the specific rhetorical function to help the listener reconstruct important information from the talk.

Rationale for the Course Design

Listening to sentence-level material and short passages trains intermediatestudents in listening skills relevant to the rhetorical function under consideration.

Materials are controlled for concept-recycling. Each passage contains a limited number of ideas that the listener retains. Support for these key ideas (that is,recycling) comes in the form of rewordings, examples, clear transition markers,and summarizing.

Because of the graded use of language within the talks, learners acquire theability to process spoken language for increasingly longer spans of time - a highlydesirable target.

In order to ensure a high degree of comprehension and monitoring of passage, a large percentage of content words need to be readily understood. Thetopics chosen for the talks have, therefore, been made as tangible as possible, with thevocabulary kept within an intermediate-level word-frequency range.

Finally, an important skill for students is note-taking, by which they spotthe main points of a talk and write them down in note form. These notes help thelistener to remember the main points of the talk.

Note-taking is an individual activity, so one person may have difficultyunderstanding another person's notes. The activities in this book should help thestudent take down clearer, more concise notes. In further activities, the learner is

often asked to complete the notes.

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